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April 21, 1956 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1956-04-21

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APRIL 21, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE'

APRIL 21, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

.....

Weakend

Trac kmen

Set

for

Ohio

Rec lays

Today

hu/1/ih 'lkh ...
WITH PHIL DOUGLIS
Daily Sports Editor
A Sports Editor's Farewell
It's all over-for me, that is.
A new Sports Editor has been named-new ideas are in force-and
I have been told in no uncertain terms, "all right Douglis-write your
last column and get out!"
Seriously, Dave Grey and his friends aren't that mean-but this
is my last column, and I do feel somewhat sad to be "Shufflin Along"
for the last time.
People often ask me these days what my views on sports in general
at Michigan are-after seeing them rather close-up for four years. /
Therefore, since my farewell has come, let me share with you a few
of my feelings on this subject.
Things have not gone as nice for Michigan sports this year as we
would have liked them to. Squabbles, riots, suspensions, and what-
have-you have been splashed across the news pages-and the name
"Michigan" has left a bad taste in more than one person's mouth. I amj
going to discount these things, however, for I sincerely believe that
some newspaper people have blown these issues way out of proportion.
Whenever you have situations loaded with tensions and high
stakes, and you throw in a few highly-talented and highly-strung
athletes, you run the chance of a "tiff"-and Michigan just had a
r few more than its share this year. However, the overall picture of
sports at Michigan is generally encouraging.
I am not going to launch into an essay on "character building,"
"wholesome recreation," or "the tradition that is Michigan." These
things are standard sports philosophies, and are all somewhat justified.-
However, in four years here, sports have meant to me somethingI
else-for it is one of the few really concrete ties that bind the studentsk
of his vast institution together.
I do not mean that a football or hockey game unites 20,000t
students into one family. However, I feel that generally, sports has
done more along these lines than any other type of activity.,
The Fading Tradition,. .
Michigan is a big place. In fact, it is too big. It s no longer the
'Ann Arbor Town" where two-thirds of the student body were forged
together by such activities as class fights, sessions at Joes or the Orient,
football trips to Chicago, and so on.
In just the past ten years; huge enrollment and staggering physical
expansion have rendered the time-encrusted "tradition that is Michi-
gan" virtually obsolete.
Vast thousands of students go through four years here hardly
realizing there is anything else at Michigan for them except an educa-
tion.
The campus is too large for the students to join as a unit in
the many all-campus social activities such as those carried on at most
of America's smaller colleges.
This assemblage of students from all over the state and nation-l
and even the world-has little in common outside of their own social1
* circles.
Even the basic purpose of Michigan-education-is not a unifying1
agent-because education here is so highly diversified that every
student travels In his own group of courses, classmates and programs.
' Not The Classroom.. .
To me, it seems that the one field in which a majority of students
carry a strong identification with his school is to be found in inter-
collegiate ahletics.
This is the one part of Michigan's life, in which a large percentage
of students from every social circle, every type of curriculum, every
part of campus have an active interest. I am not saying that every
student does-but I am sure that the majority are so inclined.
What other place do perhaps 80-90 per cent of the students;
convene at one time, than at a football game? If ever there was one
instant when the students of this University were enjoying and par-
tticipating in a single unifying event, it was when Michigan stormed
back to whip Iowa last homecoming afternoon.
But actual attendance at a sporting event is only one part of this
great unifying agent of a vast university. When a typical student goes
home and talks to his friends-I will wager that in perhaps two out of7
three cases the first 'thing talked about is "our team" . . etc. etc. It is a
"natural" for students to compare athletic prowess, of rival schools-
whether they are red-hot fans or not.
k The rivalry between colleges in the world of sports is a tremendous
stimulant to interest in athletes. I have felt it myself-especially when
covering games in other areas. S have felt it on the bleak street corners
at Houghton, Michigan, where the very mention of "Wolverine" is
treason. I could readily feel a pride in Michigan while standing in the
center of the University of Illinois' orange and blue decked campus-
far more strongly than when I stood on our own Diag. At the Broad-
moor in Colorado, up at Minneapolis, under the towers of Evanston's
Dyche Stadium, it was a burning pride in Michigan that I carried ...
as the identification grew even stronger.

Part of the Machine
Yes, much tradition is crumbling at Michigan. The vast mechani
cal educational machine has little patience with the individual student.
The complex social structures of this place have arranged themselves
into hundreds of cubby holes.
But to me-Michigan and her students do become unified as they
trudge down State Street to the vast stadium . . . or wait in long lines
for precious hockey tickets . . . as they pray for a goal-line stand .. .
or suffer together in the gall of defeat It is in the field of intercollegi-
ate athletics that Michigan and her tradition will stand-with her
students behind her.
# I not only believe this-I am certain of it. Skeptics may call it
a world of make-believe-of men playing childrens' games. I may
be off-base in my ideas. However, if such games can bring nearly
every student of such a complex institution together in one sphere of;
interest-then they certainly have their place.
In farewell, I wish to say that being a part of such a system as
this and working with the many fine gentlemen associated with it, has
been one of the most gratifying experiences of my life.
I wish to them-and to all of you-continued good luck.

PETE GRAY
recovering from mumps
I-MSoftball
Tilt Copped
By Farcrnks
Jay Goold, his twisting fastb all
working to perfection, posted his
second no hitter in, as many games
yesterday to lead the Farouk Nine
to a 7 to 0 victory over Phi Alpha
Delta in I-M, Independent soft-
ball at Ferry Field.
Goold found himself in deep
trouble several times as he walked
a total. of 10 men. But when the
chips were down the Alpha Delts
could hit nothing but air.
Harold Plassman turned in the
second best pitching performance
of the day as the Hornets defeated
All those interested in playing
soccer please meet at 8 p.m.
Sunday, in the Union.
-Tali Cepuritis, Mgr.
Nakamura 8 to 1. Plassman gave
up four safeties and one walk.
The Air Force piled up 15 runs
in the first inning on six hits,
and then wenton to defeat Geol-
ogy-Forestry, 20 Ito 5 on the three
hit pitching of Dale Briggs.
Other scorers weres: Michigan
Christian Fellowship 15, Air Force
RATC 5; Men-no-Mice 23, North
Campus 6; ldom Seen Kids 8,
Med Sox 1; ath 21, Zoology B
7; Political Science 14, Psychology
C 3; and Zoology A, Willow Run
Research Center 2.

Gray, Gluppe
Ill; To Miss
Track Meet
Top Competition1
To Vie In Relays
By JOHN HILLYER
Something much more serious
than spring fever is plaguing the
Michigan trackmen.
Mumps pose a possible threat1
to the Big Ten title hopes of Don
Canham's thinclads, and it's not
a very pleasing thought to the
squad as it heads for Columbus,
O., and this afternoon's annual
Ohio Relays.
Gray First Victim
First to fall victim recently was
star middle-distance man Pete
Gray. Although Gray's loss was
felt by the team, the disease wasn t
considered an epidemic.
However, key relay man George
Gluppe is the latest patient, and
it could develop into alarming pro-
portions.
Gray, Canham reported yester-
day, has technically recovered1
from the illness, but is so weak
from the attack that he won't be
able to practice properly for about
a month.
Gluppe's absence, according to
the Michigan coach, virtually
ruins the chances of the 440-yd.
sprint relay team.
Relay Events Prevail
Relay and field events will domi-
nate this afternoon's action at
Columbus, with a half-dozen re-
lay units .scheduled to participate
f or Michigan. Ron Wallingford,
the Wolverines' captain and star
distance runner, will anchor the
outstanding distance medley, com-
posed of Helmar Dollwet, Geert
Keilstrup and Laird Sloan in ad-
dition to Wallingford.
Gluppe will be missing, with noI
substitute announced as yet, from
both the half-mile and quarter-
mile teams. The 880 unit's other
three members will be Bob Rude-
sill, Dick Flodin and Bob Brown.
The 440 crew will consist of at
least Flodin, Brown and Tom
Hendricks.
Rudesill, Flodin and Sloan will
be joined by sophomore Don
Matheson in the mile relay, while
in the two-mile event, a fill-in for
Gray plus Robin Varian, Keilstrup
and Wallingford will perform.

STEVE UZELAC
.number one golfer
ButM
By The Associated Press
Mickey Mantle led the New York.
Yankees to a 7-1 win over the
Boston Red Sox yesterday at
Yankee Stadium but aggravated a
leg injury while doing so.
Out Five Days
Mantle injured the leg while
beating out a bunt. Doctors said
he would be out of the lineup for
five days. Red Sax star, Ted Wil-
hiams sat out his second game in:
a row because of a bruised instep.
M jAmerican LeaguCe
Yankees 7, Boston 1
Chicago 6, Kansas City 3
Cleveland 3, Detroit 1
Baltimore 3, Washington 2
National League
Brooklyn 5, Pittsburgh 0
Chicago 12, Cincinnati 1
Philadlephia 2, New York 1
Milwaukee 5, St. Louis 4
TODAY'S GAMES
American League
Chicago at Kansas City
Detroit at Cleveland
Washington at Baltimore
Boston at New York
National League
Brooklyn at Pittsburgh
Cincinnati at Chicagois
Milwakee t St.Loui

By DALE CANTOR
A promising Michigan golf squad
will get its first taste of Big Ten
competition today, when it faces
Michigan State on the University
links.
The Spartans, who finished sev-
enth in the Conference last year,
bring a relatively inexperienced!
team to Ann Arbor.
Spartan coach Ben Alstyne will
probably start junior Jim Sullivan
or senior Ken Rodewald, who was
ineligible last season, in the num-
ber one spot. Four of the remain-
ing six positions will be filled by
sophomores-Arlin Dell, Otto Sch-
ubel, George Walkusky and Dave
Belfore.
Robert Nodus and George Pries-
korn, who are returnees from last
year's aggregation, will also start.
Michigan State has already par-
ticipated in a quadrangular meet
with Purdue, Illinois and the Uni-
versity of Detroit. They downed

Illinois and Detroit, but lost to
Purdue,
Plagued by cold weather, the
Wolverine linksters have had little
practice in the past week. Several
Rocky Undecided
Rocky Marciano said yester-
day he still has not decided
whether to retire or make an-
other defense of his world
heavyweight boxing title.
Rocky acknowledged that his
wife and family want him to
retire so he can spend more
time with them, but added, "I
want to talk with my manager."
(Al Weill)
of the golfers graved the cold just
long enough to shoot nine holes.
Coach Bert Katzenmeyer has
indicated that he will use two dif-
ferent lineups for morning and
afternoon.

In the morning, Steve Uzelac
will play in the number one spot
and Skip MacMichael will follow
in the second slot. Following them
will be John Schubeck, Fred Mick-
low, Henry Loeb, Dave Wakely,
Bob McMasters and Stan Kwasi-
borski.
The lineup will be reshuffled for
the afternoon session when Schu-
beck tees off in the number one
position. He will be followed by
Micklow, McMasters, Uzelac, Mac-
Michael, Loeb, Kwasiborski and
Wakely.
Katzenmeyer is well-stocked this
season with a remarkably balanc-
ed team, so he will be doing a lot
of shifting this spring to find the
best combinations.
Judging from practice meets,
and several practice rounds, it
seems that all the Maize and Blue
players will be very closely bunch-
ed in scoring all season.

Wolverine Golfers Host Spartans;
Play In First Big Ten Meet Today

F.: .1

Come

to Church

Sunday

MARK JAFFE
pn~(de.N

By GARY PECK
"My most exciting experience,"
says Mark Jaffe, who plays num-
ber two singles on Michigan's ten-
nis team, "was reaching the NCAA
doubles semifinals last year."
Jaffe, primarily a clay court
player, entered the 1955 NCAA,
tournament with Michigan's ace,
Barry MacKay, as his partner.
Uphill Fight
The resulting fourth place fin-
ish climaxed an uphill drive for }
Jaffe. For after he lost three
straight matches during the sea-
son, he went on to capture the
Big Ten Number Two Singles;
Championship without losing an-j
other set.f
Upon questioning, the crew-cut
junior stated that playing before
the Indiana crowd was his most
maddening experience. "The crowd
was impolite, hollered, cat-called,
and did everything to distract our
attention.I am very proud to say.
that I have never found, or ex-
perienced, this situation here at
Michigan."
The crowd, evidently, must have
irked Jaffe, for he went on to
slaughter his opponent, 6-1, 6-0.
Last summer Jaffe was run-

ner-up in both the Michigan State
and Northwest Ohio tennis tourna-
ments. This summer he plans to
enter the same tournaments al-
ong with the National Clay Court
tournament in Chicago, and the
Western Lawn Tennis tournament
in Decatur, Ill.
Mark states that it is thrilling
to play alongside such a great
player as Barry MacKay. "Barry
gives me incentive to work harder
and improve my game." "But," he
quips, "it can be disheartening, for

whenever I improve my game, I
find that Barry has improved his,
too."
Jaffe was recently given the.
Yost Honor Award for his fine
scholarship, citizenship, and ath-:
letic records.
He is pinned to a girl at Penn-
sylvania State Women's College,
and spends his spare time enjoy-
ing classical music, playing ping
pong, and engaging in the bridge1
competition at the Union and
League.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays- :00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M. Friends Meeting.
10:45 A.M. Sunday School.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Williom B. Hutchinson, Eugene A. Ransom
Ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship, "Beginning Again
With God," Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M. Two, discussion groups: Problems of
Christian Belief, and Paul's Faith and World
5:0Religions.
5:30P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program. Drama Pro-
gram, "The Answers," a choral reading.
7:30 P.M. Fireside Forum, Dr. Charles Sink,
Pres. University Musical Society will speak on
"Musicians I Have Known."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, Open Daily.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street "
8 o'clock Holy Communion at St. Andrew's Church.
(Breakfast at the Canterbury House following
the 9 o'clock.)
11 o'clock Morning prayer and sermon.
5:45 Buffet Supper.
6:45 Speaker, Mr. Arthur Carr, "The Poems of
Gerald Manley Hopkins.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Chester H. Loucks and Duane L. Day, Min-
isters. Student Advisor: Beth Mahone.
9:45 The Student Class will study modern trends
in theology and will emphasize the Resurrec-
tion this week.
11:00 Sermon: "What About Sin?" Dr. Loucks.
6.00 Roger Williams' Fellowship Cabinet Meet-
ing.
6:45 Reverend Duane L. Day will speak to the
students on The Dead Sea Scrolls.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister.
8:15 A.M. Dr. Clinton L. Scott: "Modern Science
and the Liberal Church" on Station WWJ.
10:00 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group-Mr. Ronald
Anderson with films on: "Problems of the Lit-
tle Man in Asia."
10:15 A.M. Detroit Area Unitarian Radio Program
WKMH, 1310.
11:00 A.M. Services. Rev. Dewitt C. Baldwin, U
of M Co-ordinator of Religious Affairs,
preaching on: "Some Present Trends in Re-
ligion."
7:00 P.M. Unitarian Student Group.
FIRST PRESBYTERIANCHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN
(Disciples of Christ)

Hill and Tappan Streets.
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: TODAY'S REVO-
LUTION AND GOD.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
THE CONGREGATIONAL AND DISCIPLES STU-
DENT GUILD:
6:00 P.M. Supper, Bethlehem E.&R. Church.
7:00 P.M. Film: LIVE AND HELP LIVE.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship services,
with sermon by the pastor, "The Assurance
of Doubt Removed." (2nd in series of "Post-
Easter Assurances")
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Bible Study of,
"Christian Eschatology."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-74211
10:00 Morning Service.
7.00 Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Matn
Rev. Andrew Missiros
9:30 Matins
10:00 Sunday School.
10;30 Divine Liturgy.
Sermon in Greek and English.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Morse Saito, Student Director
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon: "Blessed is
the Man Whose Trust is the Lord," Rev.
Press.
6:00 P.M. Student Guild Supper.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)'
Hill St. & Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9 & 11:00 AM. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
7:00 P.M. LSA Meeting-"Student Life
in Germany," Bernhard Ruppel, Speak-
e r.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10 o'clock Sunday School.
11:00 Missionary Message -- Dr. Albert Heiser.
6:00 Student Guild.
7:00 Sermon-"The City That Knew Everything
but God," Pastor Bennett.
Wednesday 7:30 Prayer Meeting.
We Welcome You.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Church School and Junior Church at 10:45 A.M.
At the public worship service, Dr. Parr's subject
wilt be "1999: OUR HOPE FOR THE FU-
TURE."
At 6:00 P.M. Student Guild will meet at the Beth-
lehem 'Church for supper and program.

CHURCH

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11

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