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April 15, 1956 - Image 11

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-15

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SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE ELEVEN

J,

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE KLKV1~!~

SOUTH AFRICA BOUND:

'U' Telesco
By BOB BALL
Some of the centuries-old enig-
mas of the planet Mars may be
solved this summer as Earth and
Mars approached their closest
meeting of the mid-century.
Partcipating in a six-month
survey of the planet's face will be
the National Geographic Society
and the Lowell Observatory of
Flagstaff, Arizona. They have an-
nounced that they will use the
University's 27-inch refracting
telescope, the largest in the South-
ern Hemisphere, located in the
Orange Free State in Africa. At
this point Mars should appear
overhead each night during its
close approach, and the clear visi-
bility of the African winter should
be at its maximum.
Most Extensive
This exploration of Mars' sur-
face, in addition to the 20,000
photographs taken of the planet
during the summer of 1954 from
the same location, will be the most
extensive ever attempted.
Dr. E. C. Slipher, who will return
to South Africa to head the expe-
dition, and Dr. Albert G. Wilson
of the Lowell Observatory will at-
tempt to gain a more thorough
knowledge of the Martian "can-
als," plant life, atmosphere, and
geographical and climatic changes.
They will be aided not only by the
infrequent proximity of the plan-
ets, but also by new advances in
electronics which will boost the
light-gathering power of their
telescopes.
Mars, fourth planet from the
sun, follows an elliptical orbit re-
quiring 687 days for a circuit. Be-
cause of the eccentricity of its
orbit, it passes Earth about once
every two years at distances vary-
ing from 63 million miles to 35
million miles.
Entire Surface Visible
Close approaches such as the
one this summer occur every fif-
teen years. Mars, because of its
clear atmosphere and relatively
rapid rotation, is the only planet
in the solar system whose entire
surface is visible to astronomers.
Its rotation period is 24 hours and
37 minutes.
Mars is about half the -diameter
of Earth, and has a correspond-
ingly weaker gravity - 37 % of
Earth's. Its atmosphere is much
thinner; the pressure at the sur-
face -is lower than that at the
top of 29,000-foot Mount Everest.
Little oxygen has been found in
the Martian atmosphere, and only

pe To Aid in Mars Study,

traces of water vapor. The surface
is generally reddish, suggesting
deserts, over which blow yellow
clouds-possibly sandstorms.
Against this background appear
regions of changing size and
changing color, blue-green in
"spring," and browner in "fall"
and "winter." White polar caps,
perhaps ice or hoarfrost, also ad-
vance and recede over the planet's
surface, with the seasons, some-
times reaching halfway to the
equator.
Significant Change
During the 1954 survey, Dr. Sli-
pher noted a significant change in
the planet's surface: a blue-green
region of about 200,000 square
miles, approximately the size of
Texas. This was the most import-
ant change in Martian geography
since the planet was first charted
125 years ago.
According to Dr. Slipher, "Such
green areas testify that Mars is not
a dead world. Life of some sort
exists there.If this were not so,
the winds of Mars would long ago
have scattered the dust and sands
everywhere, rendering the whole
surface the same uniform tint."
Biologists believe that this life may
be akin to lichens, which have
been found even on barren Earthly
mountaintops.
Mysterious Canals
But the most fascinating of the
mysteries enshrouding the planet
are its canials, first seen in 1877
by G. Schiaparelli, an Italian as-
tronomer. When their existence
.was first announced, many people
interpreted Schiaparelli's name for
them, "canali," to mean channels,
and jumped to the conclusion that
they had been constructed by in-
telligent beings to irrigate their
bone-dry world. They have been
a subject of observation and con-
templation ever since.
Although the existence of a net-
work interlacing green areas and
desert regions is accepted, they are
supposed *by Dr. Slipher and his
colleagues to be 50-mile wide strips
of plant life. As the polar caps
melt or evaporate during the Mar-
tian Spring, moisture may be re-
leased to quicken vegetation, dark-
ening the blue-green area and
canals.
Difficult to Photograph
The canals have always been
difficult to photograph. The con-
stantly changing conditions in the
Earth's upper atmosphere, the
same conditions which cause the
twinkling of stars, raise havoc with

attempts by astronomers to photo-
graph objects such as the canals.
Up to now, good photographs
have been a rare occurrence, taken
only during the split second when
the conditions in our atmosphere
were nearly static. Photographs of
celestial objects require long ex-
posures, and this has made it
harder to obtain photographs dur-
ing these short intervals of good
seeing.
However, tests are now being
made at Lowell Observatory of
"image intensifiers," new electron-
ic apparatus capable of greatly
magnifying a telescope's power and
resolution of detail. Photographs
taken of an image in the Lumicon,
a light-boosting tube based on tele-
vision principles, require far short-
er exposure times through the tele-
scope alone.
Dr. Slipher and Dr. Wilson hope
that faster photographs will elimi-
nate the fuzziness of atmospheric
movement and give science its first
sharp, clear look at Mars.
DAILY G
OFFICIAL
B ULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Academic Notices
June Teacher's Certificate Candidates:
The Tee her's Oath will be administered
to all June candidates for the Teacher's
Certificate during April in 1437 U.E.S.
The office will be open from 8 a.m. to
12 noon and 1:30 to 4:00 p.m. The
teacher's oath is a requirement for the
teacher's certificate.
The Extension Service announces the
following Ann Arbor classes beginning
during the week of April 15:
Efficient Reading II, 7:00 p.m. Mon.,
April 16, 524 University Elementary
School.
Semantics II, 7:00 p.m. Tues., April 17.
165 School of Business Administration.
The Extension Service also announces
that there are still openings in the
following class to be held in Ann Arbor:
The Red Letter Gospel, 7:30 p.m.
Mon., April 16, 131 School of Business
Administration.
Registration for these extension class-
The
BROWN JUG

es may be made in Room 4501 of the
Administration Building on South State
Street during University office hours
or during the half hour preceding the
class in the class room.
Doctoral Examination for Lyle Eg-
gleston Craine, Conservation; thesis:
"The Muskingum watershed Conserv-
ancy District; An Appraisal of a Water-
shed Management Agency," Ties., April
17, 303 West Medical Bldg., at 3:00
p.m. Co-Chairmen, S. A. Cain and S. G.
Fontanna.
Events Today
Free Films. "Insects" and "The Cec-
ropia Meth:" 4th floor Exhibit Hall,
Museums Bldg., April 10-1E at 3:00 and
4:00 p.m., including Sat. and Sun., with
extra showing Wed. at 12:30.
Placement Notices
The following schools will have repre-
sentatives at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments to interview teachers for the
1956-57 school year.
Tues., April 17-
Carson City, Mich.-Teacher needs:
Head Basketball Coach; Instrumental
Music (Band); High School English;
Social Studies.
Battle Creek, Mich. (Harper Creek

Community Schools) - Teacher needs:
Elementary; Art, Junior High; Elemen-
tary consultant.
Sebewaing, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary; Vocal'Music, Elementary
and Secondary.
Bakersfield, Calif. (Kern County
Schools) - Teacher needs: All fields.
DeCoto, Calif. (Bay Area) - Teacher
needs: Elementary, Kindergarten to
8th.
Wed., April 18- $
Cheboygan, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Girls High School Phys. Ed.; High
School Math; Junior high Science;
Junior high English; Speech Correction.
Grand Rapids, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary; Junior High English/Social
Studies;JuniorHigh Gen. Science/
Math; High School Industrial Arts;
High School Vocal and Instrumental
Music; English; Speech Correction.
Jackson, Mich. - (Northwest Rural
Agricultural School) - Teacher needs:
Elementary; Social Studies;',General
Science; Math; Boys Phys. Ed.; Girls
Phys. Ed.; Industrial Arts; Music,
Vocal-Instrumental; Counseling-Guid-
ance.
South Redford (Detroit), Mich. -
Teacher needs: Elementary, Kdg. thru
6th; Elementary and High School Phys.
Ed. (men and women); Coach (all
except football and wrestling); Junior
High and High School Core and Social
Studies.

Thurs., Apri 19.-
Grosse Pointe, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary; Elem. Music (Vocal/Instru-
mental); High School English; Foreign
Language (German/Latin or French;
Spanish/Prench); Math (Algebra; Ge-
ometry); Social Studies (9th grade
Civics); Science (Chemistry); Special
Education-Reading Coordinator (High
School); School Psychologist; Speech
Correction; Elementary Phys. Ed. (man
or woman); High School Phys. Ed.
woman.
Hesel Park, Michigan--Teacher needs:
Elementary; Mentally Handicapped;
Visiting 'Teacher; Assistant Football
Coach; Junior High Science.
Battle Creek, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary; Junior High Girls Physi-
cal Ed.; Vocal Music; Home Ec.; High,
School Chemistry/Physics; English;
Counselor; English-Social Studies-Math.
Inkster, Mich. (Dearborn Twp. No. 8)
--Teacher needs: Elementary; Girls
Phys. Ed.; 7th Grade Social Studies
and English; 8th Grade Social Studies
and Core.
Fri., April 20-
Mount Clements, Mich. -- Teacher
needs: Elementary; Manual Arts; Li-
brarian for Public Library.
For additional information and ap-
pointments contact the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Administration
Building, NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.

A I

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Piegelbeck: GARDENING AND LAWN CARE-
Gunnison: PRACTICAL 'GARDENING
Rockwell: COMPLETE BOOK OF ANNUALS
Wise: GARDEN ENCYLOPEDIA
Kieran: INTRODUCTION TO TREES
Peterson: FIELD GUIDE TO BIRDS
Malkin: HOW TO LANDSCAPE YOUR HOME
Foley: GARDEN FLOWERS IN COLOR,
Pough: AUDUBON BIRD GUIDE

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Many others to choose from-gardening, bird watching, home Iopair
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
1216 South University f

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Qpa

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-Daily-John Hirtzel
TOP-'Ensian editorial staff appointments: -Diana Cook, '58,
Layout Editor (left). Miss Cook is a member of Delta Delta
Delta Sorority and the Scroll honorary society. Kathie ,Norman,
'57, Copy Editor. Miss Norman is a member of the Detroit Free
Press women's staff. Bottom-'Ensian business staff appoint-
ments: Judy Gamble, '58, Accounts Manager (left). Miss Gamble
is a member of Kappa Delta and the Choral Union. Glen Carl-
son, '57E, General Sales Manager. Carlson is a member of Sigma
Chi. (See story on page one.)
Left-W ing'Campus Sense'
Praises LYL, Hits At Eastland

NI

HO~ll
- -'

11

By TED FRIEDMAN
The 'Daily has been sent a
sample issue of a publication
known as "Campus Sense," which
declares it "views the Labor Youth!
League as an organization making
an especially valuable contribu-
tion to student life by its fight"
to promote "Marxism" among stu-
dents.r
The labor Youth League hasf
been listed by the Attorney Gen-
eral's office as a subversive organi-
zation.-.
The lead story of the four page
paper reads, "Lucy Ouster Iresj
Students," in which an Alabama!
500-student petition calling for
reinstatement of expelled Negrol
co-ed Autherine Lucy is described.
Beside the story is a letter whicht
the paper requests that its readers
copy and send to the President.
The letter asks enforcement of
Supreme Court -rulings and the
impeachment of Sen. James East-
land of Mississippi.
Another front page story de-
scribes the University of WisconsinI
student newspaper's editorial cam-
paign against the American Leg-
ion. It quotes the Daily Cardinal
as making such statements in re-

futation to the Legion as, "We
Cardinal's other statements in the
same editorial-such as calling the
Labor Youth League "young crack-
pots."
Other articles on the inside
pages are written along similiar
lines, with such headings as, "Why
Students Oppose Colonialism" and
"War on the United States," re-
ferring to Southern segregation.
But the "Campus Sense" story
neglects to include some of the
perceptive."
Although the paper appears at
first sight to be a college news-
paper, there is no indication any-
where that it is written or edited
by students. Its only identifica-
tion is that it's "published by the
Campus Sense Press" in New York.
SPECIALTY CUTS
FOR SPRING!
Let us create a New-Look
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WRITE: ASSOCIATION OF PRIVATE CAMPS-DEPT. C
55 West 42nd St., Room 743, New York 36, N.Y.

e4 ta 'akht
1204 South University
SPAGHETTI
AND MEALS
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10 A.M. to 8 P.M. Dail
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Senior Class Officer Petitio in
Pick up petitions at 1020 Administration Building
Thr'u April20

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