100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 15, 1956 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


T-8- MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1958

nmerich Toerek Prefers Liberty to Money
.,

By TAMMY MORRISON v
It is an oft-quoted axiom that
human beings, with their peculiar
perversity, rarely appreciate some-
thing they possess until they lose
it.
This might certainly be. said of
freedom. It often takes a person
from a foreign country to make an
American conscious of his liberty.
Such is particularly the case when
this foreigner has given up a fairly
soft and profitable life in his coun-
try to take on a comparatively
menial job in the United States.
Such is the story of Emmerich
Toerek, in Europe a celebrated en-
tertainer; in this country a janitor
in East Quad.
Played Big Cities
Hungarian-born Toerek was a
professional musical juggler who
played almost all of Europe's big
cities. His act includes all kinds of
balancing and juggling tricks
combined with music-he plays
eight instruments.
One of his most surprising rou-
tines is the old tablecloth trick in
reverse. For many years, Toerek
had included the original trick
(pulling the cloth out from under
various utensils) in his act. "Then
I thought to myself," he said, "if
I could pull it out, why couldn't I
put it back?" After many long
months of practice, he succeeded,
and the routine is now included in
his act.
'No Trickery to It'
Fifty-nine year-old Toerek has
performed at parties around cam-
pus. Jim Tarter, Resident Adviser
of East Quad's Hayden House, says
of him, "His act is really unique,
4nd it's all straight stuff. There's
no trickery to it."
Toerek became interested in
juggling in his youth. He saw his
first juggler in a circus and became
an amateur juggler when he fin-
ished schdol at the State Univer-
sity in Budapest. In 1924, he took
an exam entitling him to become
a professional juggler.
He played the European circuit
for many years. He did many
shows for the Red Cross in Hun-
Violinists Needed
The University Symphony Or-
chestra has several openings for
violinists.
Those interested may contact
Prof. Josef Blatt in Room 214,
Hill Aud.

gary until the Russians took that
country over., "I would not pla~y
for them," he explained quietly.
Shows For Army
After doing shows for the Ameri-
can Army in Germany for three
years, he came to this country and
performed here and in South
America. When his partner died
in Brazil, he came back to the
U.S., where he worked as a janitor
in Los Angeles and Detroit until
a friend persuaded him to come to
Ann Arbor.
"They hired me as a janitor-jug-
gler." he said smiling.
His family, a wife, three grown
children and a 17 year-old son,
are still in Czechoslovakia. "I want
my wife here," he said sadly, "but
the Communists say 'no.'"
Practices Daily
It is the white-haired, pink-
cheeked man's third year at the
University. He practices juggling
every day and hopes to be able to
returnto his avocation some day.
He speaks five languages: Hun-
garian, German, Serbish, "not too
much" French and "very little"
English.
Toerek thinks that American
education, as exemplified by the
University, is superior to European
in the realm of class participation.
"In Europe," he said "the pro-
fessor comes into the room and
talks; the students don't speak to
him. Here, students speak to the
professor. We only spoke if he
asked, us."
Toerek, even -though he has had
to give up his much-loved profes-
sion in the United States, said he
will not go back to Europe. In his
broken English, he tried hard to
express his feeling about this
country.
He said earnestly, "Here are
people very good-here is liberty.
And that is more than much, much
money."
Quartet To Play
The Stanley Quartet will per-
form at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
During the first half of the
program the group will play Mo-
zart's "Quartet in B flat, K. 458"
and Palmer's "Quartet No. 3." The
Palmer Quartet, which was com-
missioned by the University, will
receive its second performance on
this occasipn.
After the intermission, Beeth-
oven's "Quartet in E minor, Op.
59, No. 2" will be performed..

No Meters?
LOS ANGELES (AR) - Police
today arrested a short, stocky
ex-convict and reported the re-
covery of all but $22 of $5,800
taken in a bar holdup yester-
day.
Paul Proger, 33, was booked
on suspicion of robbery. He ex-
plained what happened to the
$22.
"I had to pay $22 in parking
fines on tickets I picked up
while casing the bar."
Find Grades
Of Pledges
Up To Par
By RICHARD TAUB
Does fraternity pledging affect
grades?
Statistics from last semester
show that there was only a slight
effect. The freshman average
grade point was 2.32 while the
pledges compiled an average of
2.25.
About 23% of all freshmen
didn't make a 2. and a slightly
greater number of pledges are
now on probation.
Pledges Express Feelings
Fraternity, pledges of last se-
mester, however, have varied feel-
ings about house activities and
resulting grades. They seem to be
divided into three camps; pledg-
ing has no effect, it does have1
effect, and, well . . . maybe.
Tony Hoffman, '58Ed, a Sigma'
Alpha Epsilon member, felt that
pledging didn't hurt him a bit. "In
fact, my grades were higher the1
semester I pledged."
However, several pledges took
the opposite point of view. One1
freshman felt that "there were
many times when I had to do
something for the fraternity the
night before a bluebook."
Another said that he could have
done much better scholastically if
he didn't have the fraternity tak-
ing up so much of his time.
'Never Pressed'
Tau Delta Phi Mike Flyer, '59,
held a position occupied by most
of the pledges interviewed. "As a
pledge I had to make better use
of my time, but I was never pres-
sed."
Another pledge agreed, "unless
a guy studies 24 hours a day, he's
just using pledging as an excuse."
And someone added, "A guy al-
ways spends some part of his day
goofing off. If he pledges a fra-
ternity he just has to goof off a
little less."

By ALLAN MERRITT
ST. LOUIS (P)-A Mississippi
River parkway extending from
Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, first
envisioned four decades ago, is
finally beginning to take form.
Many of the dedicated men who
have kept the dream alive despite
such major road-blocks as the de-
pression and World War II do not
expect the highway to be com-
pleted in their lifetime. Others
are more optimistic.
But the idea is firmly planted
now, has gained congressional
backing-and a few small sections
of new roadway have been built.
Suitable existing highways and
bridges will be incorporated into
the route.
It is called the Great River
Road.
Role in History
One aim of its planners is to
reacquaint Americans with the
great river that has had such a
decisive role in the nation's his-
tory.
Some 35 million people, one-
fifth of the nation's population,
live in the 10 states bordering the
river. Yet comparatively few per-
sons see much of the Mississippi,
particularly along its more scenic
reaches. Most Americans depend
upon books for their impressions
of river life.
There is no continuous highway
along its banks. Most of its nat-
ural beauty, the palisades and
rolling timber country of the north,
to the palms and cypress swamps
of the south, can be reached only
by boat or afoot.
What kind of a highway will it
be, this Great River Road? If
present plans are followed, it won't
be a superhighway of many lanes.
Billboards, Industries Banned
It will be a two-lane road with
controlled access, except in the
vicinity of five or six of the larger
metropolitan areas. It will be-
come an integrated part of the
highway systems of the states in-
volved, and will not be a federally=
owned parkway on the national
domain. Billboards and unsight-
ly roadside industries would be
banned. Commercial traffic would
be restricted.
There are many reasons for not
building an entirely new parkway.
The cost would be prohibitive--
more than 770 million dollars if
it were constructed on just one
side of the river from the source
to the mouth. Existing roads in
many cases already occupy the
most favorable locations.
About 60 per cent of the pres-
ent river roads are believed sat-
isfactory in both alignment and
location. Under the plan, they
will be improved and widened as
necessary.
The Mississippi River Roadway
Planning Commission had its be-
ginning in 1938. The original group
was formed by the five states bor-
dering the river on its west side.'
Before the pressure of World War
II halted legislative activities in
behalf of the project, all of the

CONGRESS APPROVES:
Mississippi River Parkway Planned

ITASCA LAKE
After 40 years as a
l dream,a Mississippi
River Parkway is be
gining to take form.j.::
, ST. PAUL
1MINNE APOLIS'.
ALM
I IN. WINONA@ W IsC.
MINN. "NoA
.....,i ....i....r.....S. LA CROSSE
* IOWA.PRAIRIE DV CHIEN
* IOWIA.
* DUBUQUE
CLINTON Ii - * ,...... ...
DAVENPORT IND.
KEOKUK ISLANDOne aim is to reacquaint
..,.............-Americans with the great
Mo. QUINCY river which has played
such a large role in the
HANNIBAL nation's history.
OALTON
lu ; * ; rE. ST. L1U415
S ST. LOUIS'i- SL
*ST GENEVIEVE CHSE ^1.
KAN.CAIRO Q\RAR2E
.,..APE GIRAREA WCKLIFFE
OKLA . '..
- """'" CAR'UTHERSL
SLYTHEVILLE TENN.
I ARKANSAS J
Final route is not CITY %
fixed; existing high- GREENVILLEI.
ways will be used- -
wherever possible. LA.'
TEA . VICKSBLIRG I'
TENN.S
- NAECHNA
BAT- McsN s
h rAA.
8A "E, .

:,

:4

4

10 states passed enabling acts look-.
ing toward a survey of the pro-
posed route or otherwise endorsed
the project.
$250,000 Authorized
A law authorizing the National
Park Service and the Bureau of
Public Roads to make a joint sur-
vey of a route was passed by Con-
gress in 1949. An initial appropria-
tion of $150,000 was made, with
a total of $250,000 authorized for
the purpose.
The recommended plan stemmed
from this survey, in which more
than 22,000 aerial photographs
were studied. No precise route
was recommended. Instead a broad
band a mile or more wide, con-
sidered feasible for a parkway, was
chartered with the exact route to
be determined later.
The Federal-aid Highway act of
1954 authorized the Bureau of
Public Roads to spend up to $250,r
000 in speeding interstate plan-
ning and coordination of the proj-
ect.
The money must be apportioned
in the 10 states in proportion to
the amounts each of the states
Hood, David"
Get Fulbrights
Two Music School professors
have been awarded Fulbright
grants.
Professor Marguerite Hood will
establish headquarters at the
Music Academy in Munich. She
plans to study music education in
German schools and institutions
for teacher education.,
Professor Hans David will be
affiliated with the University of
Florence. He will study Italian
chamber music of the 16th Cen-
tury and will make scholarly and
practical editions of outstanding
works of the period.
Both professors will leave this
fall for studies during the aca-
demic year 1956-57.
The grants were awarded to en-
able them to participate in the
International Educational Ex-
change Program of the United
States Government, established
under the Fulbright Act.

allocate for the river route. Only,
four of the 10 river states have
actually allocated money for the
River Road, thus qualifying for
federal funds under the act.
The states which have, and thy.
amounts earmarked for the proj--
ect, are Minnesota, $4,833,420.
Wisconsin, $2,715,600; Illinois,
$850,000, and Missouri, $280,117,
TU' To Make
Political Study
The University will launch .
seven-week television survey of the
American political scene during
this pre-convention period of the
presidential election year.
The first program will appear at
10:30 a.m. today on Detroit's
WWJ-TV.
Host for the series will be Prof.
Samuel Eldersveld of the political
science department. Guests in
elude: Republican state chairman
John Feikens; Democratic state
chairman Neil Staebler; political:
s c i e n c e department professors
James Pollock, Daniel McHargue.
Joseph Kallen and Henry Bretton;
and Prof. Morris Janowitz of the
sociology department.
Titles of the seven programs
are "The Great Debate"; "The
Candidates"; "The Issues"; "Cam-
paign Organization and Manage-
ment"; "Party Finances and Inter-
est Groups"; "Publicity and Prop.
aganda"; and "How People Di-
vide."
Delegation
The University will send a dele-
gation of 10 faculty and adminis-
tration representatives to the 42nd
annual meeting of the American
Association of Collegiate Regis-
trars and Admissions Officers in
Detroit April 17-20.
Edward G. Groesbeck, director
of the office of registration and
records; will head the delegation.
The University will host 400. of
those attending the conference
Tuesday afternoon with dinner at
the Michigan Union in the eve-
ning.

4

4

4

1

4

at

Itsclers-..-.

I'Moll.ld'vo w. Veo 4

MILKMAI
Think of
-'ep pink bud, as
moonlight o
olor that sets th
for a prettier, mo
you this Spring.
Milkmaid's CIO
a soft, naturalib
.. o na lin

lips in i

A
I

fashion With

IL

I

u

11

..

ID* CLOVER
a color as tender as a

s luminous as
n your lips,
e fashion
re feminine
ver adds
bloom,

i ti:
* I.""

ORDER BY MAIL AT LOW PRICES
WESTM INSTER
WAL and 5000 series
FACTORY FRESH ,e,
RECORDS WN series $2.98 our I :cord
AT wW series $3.85price original list
REDUCED PRICES price s.05
DIAMOND EE% OFF LIS

4t

%X

r,.Drrnty M[.* $498

that

LIST UP TO $4.9t

t

f

m I

0

I

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan