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March 28, 1956 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1956-03-28

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I
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAtGE THREE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Leafs

Stun

AT NEW HAVEN:
Ohio State to Defend
NCAA Swimming Title

By ED SALEM
Most of the talk and the excite-
ment over Michigan's second place
finish in the Big Ten swimming
meet has died down.
Lately, at the Varsity Pool, its
the NCAA meet that's on the tip
of everyone's tongue.
Contrary to the Western Con-
ference Meet, the NCAA champion-
ships, scheduled for tomorrow,
Friday, and Saturday at New
Haven, Conn., do not figure to
bring too much joy to Michigan.
Sights Yale As'Threat
"It appears to be Ohio State all
over again,": says Coach Gus
Stager. "However," he adds, "if
some of the Eastern schools could
break up Ohio's diving monopoly,
Yale might cause some trouble for
the Buckeyes."
Oft Bcourse, they've been saying
Rodriuez
Operationl
Wrestling captain Mike Rod-
riguez, originally expected to
undergo knee surgery either yes-
terday or today, is now listed by
University Hospital officials as
"not immediately anticipated for
surgery."
Reported to be in "satisfactory
condition," the mat star is now
under observation pending results
of x-rays and tests made yester-
day. More tests, including tension
studies and other diagnostic tech-
niques, will be applied today to
Rodriguez' injured right knee,
which is now in traction.
Awaits Doctors' Decision
Hospital' officials claim that it
will be "at least a\couple of days"
before all tests are completed and
a decision can be reached as to
whether surgery or other correc-
tive measures will be neccessary.
Rodriguez damaged his knee in
the quarterfinal round of ┬░the
NCAA Wrestling Tournament and
was originally diagnosed to be
suffering from torn ligaments and
possibly damaged cartilage.

the same thing for years, and each
year Ohio State somehow comes
out on top. This year doesn't fig-
ure to be any exception,
"One of the Midwestern schools,
maybe Indiana or Iowa, should
finish third," Stager said. "But
don't look for Michigan to be too
near the top."
Delaney, Thurlow Challenge
As for individual honors, Cap-
tain Mike Delaney and Jim Thur-
low seem to have the best chances
for high finishes. Delaney holds
the Big Ten mark for the 200-yard

Detroit;
Canadiens: .._. ~
Gain Stanley
Cup Finals
MONTREAL (A')-The Montreal
Canadiens powered in to the finals
of the Stanley Cup playoffs by lay-=
ing the New York Rangers to rest
7-0 last night.-
Defensemen Doug Harvey, rook-
ie Henri Richard and Dickie
Moore each sent two goals into
the nets for the winners.
Extend Streak
The victory gave the National
Hockey league champions the
semi-final series with the Rangers
four games to one and sent them D
into their sixth straight cup chem- ...
pionship playoff.
Meanwhile, at Toronto, the
Maple Leafs kept alive their flick-
ering Stanley Cup hopes last night YV j
by defeating the Detroit Red
Wings, 2-0, on goals by Billy-Har- In
ris and Sid Smith.
Detroit now leads in the best-
of-seven semi-final series 3-1. PHILAI
The fourth game will be played adelphiaI
in Detroit Thursday night. racuse N
Harris, Smith Score 119-96.
A crowd of 12,918 in Maple Leaf This ga
Gardens whopped it up when Har- of 11,292,

Michigan Nine Prepares
For Trip Through South

Montreal

the shoe

Despite Ferry Field's blanket of
snow, Michigan's baseball team
will soon be getting the outside
practice they need so badly before
the season starts.
In just four days, the Wolverines
swing into their Southern trip.
This will include games with Dela-
ware, the Quantico Marines,
Georgetown, and George Wash-
ington University from March 30-
April 3.
Michigan will then participate,
for the first time, in the Dixie.
Baseball Classic at Durham, North
Carolina. The Wolverines will meet
North Carolina in the first round
pairings. The tournament will also
feature Amherst, Colgate, Duke,

DOUG HARVEY
defenseman stars

rriors, Ft. Wayne Win
NBA Semi-Final Games

Loyola of the South, Wake Forest,
and North Carolina State.
On return from its southern
seasoning Michigan will swing into
its regular season's schedule which
is as follows:
April 14--Central Michigan, Here
April 12-Wayne University, There
April 14-University of Detroit, Here
April 17-restern Michigan, Here
April 18--Notre Dame, Here
April 23-Wayne University, Here
April 24-Western Michigan, There
April 27-Indiana, Here
April 28-Ohio State (2), Here
May 3-Notre Dame, There
May 4-Northwestern, There
May 5-Wisconsin (2), There
May 11-Illinois, Here
May 12--Purdue (2), Here
May 18-Iowa, There
May 19-Minnesota (2), There
May 22-University f Detroit, There
May"25-Michigan State, There
May 26-Michigan State, Here
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DRESS OR
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C.'

DELPHIA (MP)-The Phil-
Warriors downed the Sy-
ationals here last night
me, played before a crowd
the largest ever to watch

JIM THURLOW
breaststroke hope
butterfly, while Thurlow came in
second in the 200-yard breast
stroke.
Charlie Bates, Wolverine diver
who finished sixth in the NCAA
high and low boards last year
could add more points for the
Wolverines. For that matter, John
Murphy, who finished ahead of
Bates in the Big- Ten meet and
John Narcy, if he has a good day,
could also' place in the diving.
I-M SCORES&
PADDLEBALL
Scott 2, Wenley 0
Williams 3, Gomberg 0
VOLLEYBALL
Psych. A, 6, Cooley 0
Museum 5, Psych, Engineers 1
Chemistry 6, East Engine 0
Psych. "C" 6, Geology 0

There will be a meeting of all
men interested in trying out for
the freshman golf team on
Thursday, March 29, at 5 p.m.
in the I-M Building.
-Rod Grambeau
ris, a rookie, broke a scoreless
deadlock at 10:58 of the second
period. He scored on a screened
shot from 25-feet out after taking
passes from Earl Balfour and Jim
Thomsen.
Then with the Iced Wings bat-
tling to even the count early in
the third period Smith took, Ron
Stewart's neat pass and drove the
disc past goalie Glen Hall at 3:15.
<To Olympics'
MELBOURNE, Australia (A) -
Russia will send 400 athletes, 60
officials, 20 newsmen -- and 2
cooks - to the Olympic Games
here.
A Russian delegation here to
view the games preparations an-
nounced that yesterday before
leaving for Moscow.

the Warriors in Philadelphia, gave
them a 2-1 lead in the eastern
division best-of-five playoffs of the
National Basketball Association.
In the Western division playoffs
at St. Louis, the Fort Wayne Pis-
tons evened their series at 2-2
with the St. Louis Hawks by vir-
tue of a 93-84 victory.
George Yardley paced the Pis-
tons with 30 points, while they
padded their lead with deadly free-
throw accuracy.
* * *
Harrison Honored
Bill Harrison, coach of Clarkson
Tech's undefeated hockey team,
was named collegiate "hockey
coach of the year" at the annual
meeting of college hockey coaches
this weekend in Boston.
Michigan's Vic Heyliger receiv-
ed the honor in 1954, while Har-
vard's Ralph "Cooney" Weiland
won the award last year.
* *~
'M' Sailors First
Last week-end while new snows
swept the mid-west, the Michigan
Sailing Club took first place in a
six-team regatta on the frigid
waters of Cowan Lake, Cincinnati.
Sailing in their first meet of the
year, Bruce Goldsmith and Dexter

Thede garnered a total of 54 points
in their 12 foot Penguin, good
enough for a 13 point bulge over
second place Xavier.
Finishing behind Xavier were
Washington University of Saint
Louis, University of Cincinnati,
Wooster and Wayne in that order.
* * * ,
Dodgers, Braves Plan Tour
ROME (/)-The Brooklyn Dod-
gers and the Milwaukee Braves--
expected to scrap it out for the
1956 National League pennant-
plan a joint exhibition tour to
Europe next fall or spring of 1957.
Lou Perini, the Braves' presi-
dent, is here now to look over the
field. The idea is to sell baseball
and Democracy to Europe.

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CLUBS BAND TOGETHER:
Minor Sports Groups Plan New Board

i

v

By DALE McGHEE
Four of the University's minor
sports are in the process of "dump-
ing their problems into one
basket."
In an attempt to klleviate the
struggle with finances common to,
most small campus organizations,
members of the four are forming
a board for minor athletics.
The board at present will include
All freshmen interested in
trying out for the freshman
baseball team report to Yost
Field House between 3 and 4
p.m. April 9.
Bring your own spikes, glove
and cap.
-Matt Patanelli
representatives from the Rifle
Club, Ski Club and Chess Club.
Others may join later.
Fostered by SGC
The plan has been fostered by
the Campus Affairs Committee of

the Student Government Council,
who called interested groups to-
gether last semester and has been
working with them and the ad-
ministration since.
Although many of the minor
sports are small in number, their
financial demands are often com-
parable to those of much larger
and prominent groups.
Expensive Clubs
The Rifle Club estimates a cost
of $250 to properly equip each
member of the club.
John Germer, '568, commodore
of the Sailing Club, asserted; "Our
dues are tremendous. Any outside
help would do a great deal to cut
down expenses."~
Both the Ski Club and Chess
Club seek greater campus recogni-
tion through the proposed board.
The Ski Club is also in need of
funds for a ski slope and equip-
ment.
The Campus Affairs Committee
feels that these groups are such

an asset to the University, especi-
ally through public relations, that
they should have better represen-
tation among campus organiza-
tions.
New Benefits
Coordinating such athletics un-
der one organization will permit
them to sponsor larger scale func-
tions such as Cinema Guild and
all-campuis activities.
The groups will meet in the near
future to form a constitution for
the board. They hope to have the
board set up by the end of the
semester so that it can start func-
tions next fall.
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Kansas City 7, Detroit 2
Brooklyn 6, Philadelphia 2
Cleveland 8, Baltimore 7
Chicago (N) 13, New York (N)
10
St. Louis 2, Milwaukee 1
Boston 7, Chicago (A) 2
Pittsburgh 5, Cincinnati 4

Ging

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