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March 28, 1956 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH. 29, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 1956

ORT OF SCHIZOPHRENIC':
Grad Student Writes, Directs Own Play

By TAMMY MORRISON
The speech department's upcom-
ing production of "My Very Own"
marks several "firsts."
It's the first time a graduate
student has directed a full-length
production here.
It's the first time a playwright
has directed her own Hopwood
- award-winning play while still a
student here.
And it's the first play that Bev-
erly Canning, Grad, ever wrote.
* Attractive, dark - haired Miss
Canning, who hails from Maine
and Baltimore, started the play
before she came to the University
to work on her doctorate in speech.
She finished it while enrolled in
Prof. Kenneth T. Rowe's playwrit-
ing class last year.
It won a major Hopwood drama
award.

Illinois College of
OPTOMETRY
anncunces that applica-
tions for admissions to its
classes beginning Sept. 10,
1956are nowbeing received.
3-year professional course.
Leading to Doctor of
Optometry Degree::
Requirements for Entrance
2 years (60 sem. hours or
equivalent qtr. hrs.) in spe-
cified lib. arts and sciences.
FOR BULLETIN
PLEASE WRITE REGISTRAR
ILLINOIS COLLEGE
of OPTOMETRY
3243 S. Michigan Ave.
Technology Center, Chicago 16,Ill.

Miss Canning graduated from
Goucher college in 1949 and re-
ceived her master's degree from
Johns Hopkins in 1953. Her ma-
jor interest lies in teaching speech
in college. She had some experi-
ence in this field at Goucher and
hopes to continue it.
Her play, which has an all-fe-
malercast, concerns threengenera-
tions of one closely-knit family.
The plot revolves around the third
generation, which is trying to as-
sert its independence.
Miss Canning first got the idea
for "My Very Own," opening at 8
p.m. today at Lydia Mendelssohn,
while teaching and directing at
Goucher. "Goucher is a girls'
school," she said, "and the prob-
lem of finding a play for an all-
female cast is acute.
"I decided that I'd try to write
one."
She first came to the University
in the summer of 1953, then taught
for a year. She returned in the
summer of 1954 to complete work
on her doctorate. Last year, she
was a counsellor in Alice Lloyd
Hall.
Last fall, the speech department
decided to initiate a new policy
of allowing a graduate student to
direct a full-length production.
Miss Canning applied, and she and
her play were chosen.
The playwright-director has al-
ways been interested in the thea-
ter, from the time she took danc-
ing lessons as a little girl. She's
done some acting as a student, but
not professionally.
She's enjoyed it, and feels that
anybody who wants to direct needs
to know about acting. "The more
you know about the theater, the
better prepared you are to direct."
Miss Canning feels that there

;i

are both advantages and disadvan-
tages to a playwright directing his
(or, in this case, her) own play.
"One advantage is that you
learn a lot about the play from
working so closely with it," she
said. "Some lines that look fine
on paper just don't sound right
when spoken. In that case, you're
around to rewrite.
"But on the other hand, you're
always worried about being ob-
jective enough." She smiled, "I
sometimes feel sort of schizophre-
nic."
World Peace
Called Goal
Of Burmese
By SUE JESSUP
Burma's policy of neutralism is
calculated to bring world peace,
Dwa Mya Sein, Rangoon Univer-
sity history professor, said in a lec-
ture given yesterday.
"My country doesn't believe in
passive existence," she explained.
However, Burmese prime minister
U Nu feels that only through fol-
lowing a neutral policy can the
necessary understanding between
nations be achieved.
In order to further the idea of
knowledge through understanding
U Nu has traveled extensively.
At the present time Burma is
working toward peace even though
many internal problems exist. Miss
Sein cited the problem of Com-
munist resistance groups and
changes in the nation's economy
as being the most difficult to solve.
"It is difficult to deal with the
Communists," she said, because
many of these people fought with
the anti-Japanese resistance dur-
ing the war. She added that the
peoples resistance groups are plit
by ideological differences.
In order to cope with falling
rice prices new industries are be-
ing developed.
"Even though we need factories
and industrial development we still
hope to preserve our traditional
culture, and avoid the evils of an
industrial revolution," she remark-
ed.
Citing the spiritual problem
along with political and economic
ills, Miss Sein discussed the re-
vival of Buddahism. U Nu believes
the hear of the nation's problems
are found in moral degeneration.
As a result of the. Prime Minis-
ters concern, a revival of Budda-
hism began.
Miss Sein added that all reli-
gions were encouraged to flourish
since Burma is a secular country.
Both Moslems and Christians have
recently been active in winning
converts.
Miss Sein's talk was the last in
a series of six lectures sponsored
by the Japanese Institute of Far
Eastern Studies. These lectures
were given for the purpose of pro-
moting better understanding be-
tween the United States and Bur-
ma.

Cortright,
Schubeck
Win Contest
John Schubeck, '57, and Ruth
Cortright, '58, were selected to be
the University's representatives in
the Hearst Oratorical District con-
test.
Schubeck won the nomination
in the junior-senior division for his
speech on John Adams entitled
"Barbed in a Garden." Schubeck
also won the campus contest last
year.
Miss Cortright, winner among
the freshman-sophomore contest-
ents, also spoke on John Adams.
Her speech was entitled "A Man
Stood Up To Preach."
The two Michigan representa-
tives will compete against speakers
from other colleges in the Detroit
district early in May.
Other contests are being held
now in the district comprised of
out-state colleges. The winner in
the outstate district and the win-
ner from the Detroit area will then
represent Michigan in the national
finals of the Hearst Contest.
Last year's winner from the De-
troit area, Roger Lindemann of
Wayne, went to the national finals
before he was defeated.
Organization
Notices
Congregational and Disciples Guild:
Meditation-study group, today, 5:10-6:00
p.m., Guild House.
Pre-Easter Fellowship Supper, tonight,
6:00 p.m., Guild House, 524 Thompson.
Lutheran Student Association: Lenten
Service and communion, tonight, 7:15
p.m., Lutheran Student Chapel at Forest
and Hill Streets. There will be a class
on Luther's catechism following the
service.
Michigras: Campus Publicity Com-
mittee will meet tonight, 7:30 p.m.,
3rd Floor Corridor, Michigan Union.
NAACP: Meeting, tonight, 7:00 p.m.,
Rm. 3G, Michigan Union.
Orthodox Student Society: The March
28 meeting of the Orthodox Student
society has been cancelled. Members
may attend the Lenten devotional serv-
ice at St. Nicholas Orthodox Church
at 7:30 p.m., tonight. Following the
service a discussion, led by Rev. Andrew
Missiras will be held in the Church
Hall.
* * *
Physics Club: Mr. F. M. Phelps will
speak on "The Top." tonight, 7:30 p.m.,
Rm. 2038, Randall Lab.
* * *
Sigma Alpha Iota: American Musi-
cale, tonight, 8:30 p.m.,' Auditorium A,
Angell Hall. Open to public.
Young Friends are providing trans-
portation and uniforms for all persons
Interested in volunteer work at Ypsilanti
State Hospital on Saturday afternoons,
leaving from the Friends Center on
Hill St. at 12:30 p.m. For applications
and reservations, call Sonia Gray, Oster-
weii House.
* *
Botanical Seminar: Dr. Peter Hyypio
of the botanical gardens will speak on
"Studies on the Short-Time Effect of
Colchicine on Mitosis," at 4:15 p.m.
today in 1139 N.S. Refreshments at 4
p.m.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES

LINES
2
3
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1 DAY
.66
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3 DAYS
1.47
1.95
2.46

6 DAYS
2.15
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4.30

TONIGHT AT 8a
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PRESENTS
Premiere Production
1955 HOPWOOD AWARD PLAY
~ MYVERY OWN" a
Written and directed by Beverly Canning
Graduate Student '56
Wed., Thurs., March 28, 29 --8:00 P.M.
STVDE NTS 50c
All Seats Reserved
$1.20 - 90c - 60c
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
. 4 .. 16 .4ea c a6. . ...A5 a . 20

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
USED CARS
'48 Pontiac
convertible, radio, heater, good top
and tires. Can be seen 2115 Wood-
side Rd., Ann Arbor. Make an of-
fer. )145N
1947 Cadillac
62 series four-door sedan. One owner
car. Motor in good condition $300 cash.
NO 3-3446. )144N
1952 FORD, 37,000 miles, like new.
Phone NO 2-0738. )143N
1950 Ford Convertible. Good condition.
Reasonable. Call NO 3-4129. Sun. 3-5,
Weekdays 4-6. Ask for Ivan. ) 142N
1952 PLYMOUTH 4 door sedan, heater,
seat covers, excellent condition. NO
2-9853 evenings only. )138N
OUR LOW
OVERHEAD
saves you money
50 new and used cars to choose from.
'Come out today to the BIG NEW lot
at 3345 Washtenaw.
Fitzgerald
LINCOLN - MERCURY
Phone NO 3-4197
Open evenings till 8
1941 FORD Club coupe, good tires, no
rust, runs perfectly, $95.
1952 CHEVROLET 2-door, grey, real
clean and low mileage, $445.
1953 WILLYS hardtop, 2-tone paint, ra-
dio, heater, overdrive, 20,000 miles,
white-walltires and like new, $745.
1950 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, radio.
heater, in excellent condition, $445.
Jim White Chevrolet, Inc.
Ashley at Liberty, First at Washington
Phone NO 2-5000 or NO 3-6495.
)130N
FOR SALE
LIVE EASTER BUNNIES, tropical fish,
UNIVERSITY AQUARIUM, 328 E. Lib-
erty, NO 3-0224. ) 164B
GOLF CLUBS. 2 used sets - $35.00 each.
NO 3-4829. )163B
ARMY, NAVY type oxfords-$6.88, sox
39c, shorts 69c, military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)123B
R I
Ta-ta . . . Mama! We're
off to catch one of
those delicately browned

BUSINESS SERVICES
Springtime
Is
Picture Time
Used Camera Clearance
ARGUS C3's-With case and flash,
$34.95 to $39.95.
KODAK PONY 135's - Complete
with case and flash, $25.
KODAK PONY 828-F 4.5 lens, 20.
SPARTUS-35 m m camera, $6.
KODAK 35-With coupled range-
finder and case, $25.
KODAK-8 m m movie cameras, $20.
REVERE 88-8 m m movie camera
with F 2.5 lens, $25.
REVERE TURRET-Magazine 8 m
m m movie camera, with F 1.9
lens, $89.50.
KODAK-Duoflex cameras, $9.
IKOFLEX-Automatic Reflex with
F 2.8 Zeiss Tessar lens, $69.50.
GRAFLEX 22-Latest model, like new
and with case, $67.
VOIGHTLANDER - Vessa 11 with
coupled rangefinder, F 3.5 Skopar
lens, $69.50.
AUTOMATIC ROLLEIFLEX - F 3.5
Xenar ns and full MX sync., like
new, with case, $155.
KODAK-Folding cameras, from $8.
Purchase from
Purchase
Camera Shop
1116 S. University Phone NO 8-6972
Have your camera checked
FREE
by our camera repairmen
New Atlas Tires
6.70x15, $15.95: 6.00x16, $13.95; 760x15,
$19.95 (exchange price plus tax)
Hickey's Service Station

NO

BUSINESS SERVICES
SMITH'S FLOOR COVERINGS
205 N. Main . 207 E. Washington

Guaranteed installation or
"do-it-yourself."

)36J

TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-ride Miami to Detroit, April
7-8. Will share driving and expenses.
R. Herbart, 307 Mich Mouse W.Q. NO
2-4401. )48G
DRIVING along Pennsylvania Turnpike
Sat.? Want to share ride to Pittsburg
area. Phone NO 3-1561 Ext. 82, Leave
message if not there. )48G
LEAVING for Aspen, Colorado via Den-
ver, at noon Friday, March 30. Will
return in time for classes April 9.
x Room for 1. NO 3-2543. )51G
LEAVING for Buffalo, New York, Friday.
Will take 3 passengers. Call NO 8-
9683. ,)46G
AVIS RENT-A-CAR OR TRUCK for
local or long distance use. Reason-
able daily, weekly, or hourly rates.
Nye Motor Sales, Inc., 210 W. Wash-
ington St. NO 3-4156. )155
RIDERS to Madison, Wisc. Leave Satur-
day A.M., March 31. NO 3-1511. Ext.
2651. Mr. Littig. )45G
PERSONAL
WE GIVE LOANS TOO-until your sub-
scription starts! Student Periodical,
NO 2-3061. )127F
FOR SALE -- Telephone parts. Cheap.
Hurry. Phone NO 2-3119. )125F
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted tuxedos converted to
single-breasted, $18, or new silk shawl
collar, $25. Write to Michaels Tailor-
ing Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit, Michi-
gan, for free details or phone
WOodward 3-5776. )118F
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-high school class ring, red stone
with initials J.R.S. inscribed. Finder
please return to lost and found dept.
Michigan Union. )155A
LOST-Sigma Alpha Mu pin. Contact R.
Arnove, 5 Wenley, W.Q. 154A
LOST - Man's gold LeCoultre watch
vicinity Couzens Hall. Reward. Phone
Jos. Haselby, NO 3-3393. )153A
LOST on either Hill, Packard or Main
Streets, yellow envelope containing
checks and cash for the Ann Arbor
Trust.Please return to 805 Oxford or
call Ken Hildebrand, NO 3-3474. Re-
ward. )151A
SPORT GOODS
GOLF EQUIPMENT
Stop in and visit Michigan's best
equipped Pro-Shop. All makes. Golf
clubs; bags, caddy carts, and ac-
cessories. Shag bails $2.00 per doz.
Open 12 noon to 8:30 P.M. Bob Ap-
plegate's Golf and Gift Mart. 200 N.
4th Ave. )18S

Headquarters in Ann Arbor for:
Armstrong linoleum and tile
Q 3-8321 NO 2-9418
Cornplete floor coverings shops
Mohawk and Bigelow carpets

HELP WANTED
DBSPERATELY WANTED: Ride to fairly
nearby ski resort during vacation.
Please call 2-9712. ) 50H
MALE, general porter work. 8 to 12 hours
per week. $1.00 per hour. Call at 6:00
or after 10:00. NO 2-5614. )100H
SALES CORRESPONDENT-experienced
and efficient businesswoman desiring
permanent position dictating letters
to printing customers. Ability to use
dictaphone, knowledge of good cus-
tomer relations and sales letter writ-
ting techniques helpful.
Edwards Brothers, Inc.
2500 S. State )99H
STUDENT ORGANIZATION is interest-
ed in finding a non-student woman
with business procedure to work aft-
ernoons from 3 to 5, and Sat. morn-
ings 9 to 12. Phone NO 2-5514 between
5 and 6 P.M. only. Ask for Fred Shel-
don. )98H
WANTED--Male to supervise children in
after school hours. 25-35 years. Call
NO 5-5414 after 9:30 P.M. )97H
COLLEGE MEN to work as group coun.
selors in 12 week summer program at
Methodist 2hildren's Village, Detroit.
Salary and maintainance. Previous ex-
perience preferred. Call Mr. De Muth,
KE 14060 between 9 and 5 P.M. week-
days. )95H
MATURE ENGINEER to do architectur.
al porcelain enamel layout, field Work,
and handle office woric. An excellent
opportunity to grow with a new in-
dustry. Salary commensurate with
ability. Phone 3-2407. )93H
WANTED-Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call NO 2-3241.
, )84H
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part time.
Apply 113 S. Ashley.Ann A -bor Yellow
aid Checker Cab Company. Phone
NO 8-9382. )70H
FOR RENT
APT. TO SUBLET during summer
months. Phone NO 3-8364 after S p.m.
)370

'A

3
key

4

=r

,Yt

t

1Read

Daily
Classifieds

4

4!

Cor. N. Main & Catherine.

NO 8-7717
)42J

RE-WEAVING. Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)30J
RICHARD MADDY - VIOLINMAKER.
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. 131J

CANOE TRIPS
SeeK solitude and adventure in the
Quetico-Superior wilderness. Canoe,
complgte camping equipment and
excellent food supplies only $5.0
per person per day. Grumman ali-
minum canoes. For colored booklet
and map, write to:;
BILL ROM, Mgr., Canoe Country
Outfitters. Box 71C, Ely, Minnesota

Al

Ending
Today

n:_l.~

NO 2-3136
CLIFTON K * GLORIAGRAHAME
COL.OR by DE LUXR
C NrMAScP 0

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*1

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7-

.zji

ALL-CAMPUS ELECTIONS TODAY

Broiled Rainbow

Trout,

I

I

dipped in lemon butter,
with tartar sauce, at the

YOUNG DEMOCRATS PANEL DISCUSSION
"The Means of Securing Integration
in the South"
PROF. LESLIE- History Dept.
PROF. CUTLER - Psychology Dept.
BOB EVANS - NAACP
DAVE MARLIN - Law School
Women's League: Wednesday, 7:30, Rm. D, E
Also Club Elections

yu

Golden Apples
What a dish!

R oo m.

i

St ef*V* < U
J ROAP MU 4Wn'fcSM

14

HAVE MORE FUN THIS SPRING VACATION
Head for these mid-town
HILTON AND STATLER HOTELS
which offer you
NAME BAND ENTERTAINMENT
AND SPECIAL STUDENT RATES

I

Dial U

m

*s
1/

In Ne'w York:
The THE STATLER
The Dorsey Brothers in the Cafe Rouge
THE NEW YORKER:
Lenny Herman and his orchestra in the Golden Thread
THE PLAZA:
Edith Adams and Richard Hayman in the Persian Room
THE WALDORF-ASTORIIA
Benny Goodman in the Empire Room
In HWashington:
THE STATLER
Lisa Kirk and Steve Kistey in the Embassy Room
In Hartford:
THE STATLER
Art Lowry and his orchestra in the Terrace Room
In Boston:

Dial
2-2513
NOWE
ACADE
E MN"B est Picture

Playing
'iu Through
Friday

Y AWARD . WINNER
ER! ACAF4
r ofthe earA-CADEMY
of te Yer"' AWARDS

,r
a

iI

i f imt w

Best Picture

11

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i

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