100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 27, 1956 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t erIr ZITV1F

TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 1956

THlE MICHIGAN :DAHA V

t - k

U al~u' UFIVE

Ticket Plans
For Carnival
To Begin
Michigras Committee
To Start Campus Sale
After Spring Vacation
With Michigras less than a
month away, main plans of most
of the groups are nearing comple-
tion, but the work of ticket com-
mittee is just beginning.
Starting Monday, April 9, the
first day after vacation, Michigras
tickets may be purchased in dormi-
tories, fraternity and sorority
houses. This district pre-sale will
continue until Friday, April 20.
Admission tickets will also be
available to students during a
campus pre-sale to be held from
Monday, *April 16 to Friday, April
20.
i . 320,000 Tickets Ordered
Tickets co-chairmen, Joanne
Marsh and Bruce Boss say that
they are ordering 20,000 admission
tickets ,and 300,000 concession
tickets for the carnival weekend.
In charge of district pre-sales
are Herb Hedges and Maureen Is-
ay.
Gloria Anteby and Paul Vitz
chairmen of Campus pre-sale, need
students to act as sellers, Miss
Marsh remarked.
Volunteers Wear Hats
Those volunteering their ser-
vices, she added will be distin-
guished from their campus fel-
lows by a unique spring outfit.
Their garb, borrowed from the of-
ficial Michigras symbol, Michiclef,
will include !bow ties and straw
hats..
Distribution of concession tick-
ets on Friday and Saturday nights
falls to the lot of the personnel
committee headed by Al Schadel
and Joan Mason. They also need
t assistants and ask interested stu-
dents to contact them.
Counting and collecting com-
mittee co-chairmen, .,Ruth Plant
and.Joe Sherman plan to use a
scae to determine winning booths,
since counting by hand to see who
had taken the most tickets would
be an "almost impossible task."

Sororities' Histories
Show Many Traditions

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is
the second in a series of ar-
ticles dealing with the history
and traditions of sororities on
campus.)
By JANIE FOWLER
Largest of all sororities with 118
chapters, Chi Omega was organ-
ized in 1895 at Arkansas and began
in 1905 at the University.
The Chi O's have two awards,
one given to the outstanding wom-
an on campus in the field of social
studies, and their National Chi
Omega Award for the woman of
the year' In the past this has
been presented to such great wom-
en as Madame Chiang Kai-Shek.
Traditions within the house in-
clude naming a group of coeds,
who do the least, "the Failures,"
while the Chi-O-Daddy Award is
given to the fellow, dating a mem-
ber, who has contributed most to
the house.
Announce Engagements
Pinnings and engagements of
women are announced in'a special
ceremony where allthe sisters sit
in a circle in the darkened living
room, passing a lighted candle
round and round until it stops at
the lucky coed.
Called by "Who's Who," "the
strongest local in the United
States," Collegiate Sorosis was
founded in 1886 as a break away
from a national sorority.
Taking the Greek word for "ag-
gregation" as their name, the
group holds a meeting every third
year to which all alumnae return.
Soccer Game
The Sorosis coeds meet'members
of Kappa Alpha Theta in an an-
nual soccer game between halves
of the traditional Sigma Alpha
Epsilon-Phi Delta Theta Mud Bowl
game each Homecoming Saturday.
Other house customs include
candle light dinners with demi-
tasse afterwards and awards for
the sophomore and senior with
the highest grades.
The Drake Award is given to the
sister who has done the most on
campus and brought the most
happiness to the house.
Installation Night, Monday, Ap-
ril 16, Delta Delta Delta will award

the scholarships that it gives an-
nually, both locally and nationally,
as its service project.
Funds for the scholarships are
raised at the benefit bridge party
given for the campus, alums and
townspeople each spring.
With 99 chapters, Tri-Delt was
founded in 1884, coming here in
1894.
Traditional Banquet
Among sorority traditions is the
scholarship banquet held every
spring in the house to honor out-
standing grades and activities.
Gamma Phi Beta boasts the
distinction of being the first sor-
ority at the University to have
continually operated its chapter,
although it was the second on
campus, being founded here in
1882.
An interesting sidelight in the
organization's history tells how
the Michigan League was founded
'in 1889 by a group of Gamma
Phi's.
Philanthropic Projects
Begun nationally in 1874, at Sy-
racuse University, the sorority
owns and operates two camps for
underprivileged children in Colo-
rado and British Columbia.
The philanthropic project of the
local chapter is the support of a
European warsorphan under the
Foster Parent's Plan.
House traditions include a din-
ner where-actives serve their din-
ing room waiters and the waiters
crown a kitchen queen, and the an-
nual pledge-active football game.
Gamma Phi pinnings and en-
gagements are announced by ori-
ginal skits at dinner.

for the ultimate
in casual comfort ..

r
r
r
..

-Daily-Jim
WAA BLAZER.

W AA To Sel
U' Blazers
Orders for the "official" Uni-
versity blazer for coeds, featuring
a crest on the pocket, will be tak-
en from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. today
at the Women's Swimming Pool.
Matching and contrasting skirts
and Bermuda shorts will also be.
sold. They will be available in a
variety of styles and colors which
complement the blazers.
Personal fittings will be made
at the order session today, with'
all alterations made at no extra
charge, except for shortening
sleeves.
A $5 deposit will be required as
a down payment for the blazers.
The remainder can be paid when
the blazers arrive.
Special features of the jackets
are the University seal on the
Pocket and a choice of colors for
piping on the jacket edges,
An extra pocket is also includ-
ed with each blazer. This pocket
may be used to replace the crested
pocket after a student graduates.
All profits from the sale will go
to the Women's Athletic Associa-
tion.

O*LD MAINE
RMxswW VAMP R#4$MAL
Handsewn Moccasins
supple, flexible thoroughbreds
Famous campus classics, all-time casual
favorites . . our easy-stepping calf loafer,
newly crafted with firm supporting foam
rubber arch, non-sag heel construction and
oil-treated flexible soles for every kind of
weather. Antiqued brown, red, black, or ivory.
8.95

i

«i

* ..$
r
e
lI
1
Y

.

1

I.

II

aerobe Camp4'4 I

RESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN:
Assembly Board Selects
Candidates for President

Candidates for the office of As
sembly Board president were an
nounced at the Assembly Dormi
tory Council meeting held yester-
day at the League.
Two sophomores in the liter-
ary college are running for the
position.; Jean Scruggs will op
pose Alice Basford.
For the first time, women liv-
ing in resident halls will have an
opportunity to meet the candi-
dates as they campaign in the
houses beginning this week.
Will Take Straw Vote
After the candidates have spok-
en, a straw vote will be taken in
each living unit. On Monday
April 16, ADC representatives wil
vote according to their house's
preference.
ADC also will elect the first vice
president. All other offices are
filled through petitioning and in-
terviewing by Assembly Board.
Results of the election will be
announced at League Installation

- Night, Monday, April 16. The oth-
- er Board members will be revealedj
- at the same time.
President of Angel House
Miss Basford is the president
e of Angel House, a member of
- League Council and Women's Sen-
ate, and on the administrative
- committee for North Campus
Dorms,
Miss Scruggs is presently on the
e Assembly Board serving in the
position of personnel chairman.
She was co-chairman of the Pan-
hellenic-Assembly rushing study
I committee and is the secretary of
tl e student relations committee.
1 Volunteers are needed for the
coordinating committee, set up by
ADC for Ann Arbor women who
are, interested in becoming as-
sociate members of a dormitory.
Persons who would like to serve
on this committee are requested
to turn in their names at the
League Undergraduate Office.

LEAGUE COUNCIL-There will
be a League council meeting at 5
p.m. today in the League.
LANTERN NIGHT-All house
presidents or song leaders will meet
to discuss Lantern Night at 5:10
p.m. today in the Women's Ath-
letic Building.
BURO-CAT-There will be a'
meeting of tbie Buro-Cat activi-
ties committee at 6:30 p.m. today
in the League.
FROSH! WEEKEND -- Commit-
tees which will meet today for the
Maize Team are programs at 6:30
p.m., publicity at 6:45 p.m. and
properties at 7:30 p.m. Blue Team
decorations committee will meet
at 5 p.m.
* * *
BALLET CLUB-Members of the
co-recreational Ballet Club will
meet at 7 p.m. today in Barbour
Gymnasium.
ATHLETIC MANAGERS-House
Athletic Managers will meet at
5:10 p.m. tomorrow in the Wom-
en's Athletic Building. All Mana-
gers are requested to bring softball
blanks to the meeting, for the!
tournament which will begin Tues-
day, April 10.
,* * *
SENIOR SOCIETY SCHOLAR-
SHIP-Applications for the $1001
Senior Society Scholarship may be
obtained at the League Undergrad-
uate Office. Any second semester
junior or first semester senior may
apply.
: 1asam am m

K I

:w 4, +e~ ' ..:....d".,o..."."r,...X'.......v...r............. .........................................4::..............}?:S: F.:; i}:.,...""".^v

*
Sizes 7 to 15 - 10 to 44
Tall 10-20
Shorter 12 to 24 ,.z
BELOW: Duster coat of

Sun Tine-Fuin Time
COTTONS
for a Southern Vacation
WONDERFUL NEW FABRICS
DRIP DRY-NO IRON
WRINKLE RESISTANT FOR TRAVEL
SPORTS AND DRESS UP
S9.s 9
"4. . Sc '
For ualiappy VaEcUat

;(f1

/ I "2 1
ABOVE: Stripe no-iron
cotton a delight to wear
all summer. Styled full of
skirt -- push-up sleeves,
navy - brown - red, at
$12.95.
AT LEFT: This flower
sprigged cotton satin will
take you dining and
dancing at $17.95.

r'
. hi"
Tra'
rJi1
flr
ALA
Vt
v "±r!
$ 1
:{rte
{J:
:tiff:
1 "
' ":pt
I
J:.
J-
J r!
:41"
iy{
r1
:1L
:I{
Lf
il:

Linen
cotton.

like rayon and
Tops for your en-

semble coat at $10.95.

FIs

shop at

i

shop at W~ ~ ~ -~ -~ ~f ~ ~ A. W ~ -~ w

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan