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February 16, 1955 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-16

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'>1

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1955

0 ... MAW

-Coutresy Anna Friedberg
BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET features (I. to r.) Joseph Roisman, 1st violin, Jac Gorodetzky, 2nd
violin, Mischa Schneider, cello and Boris Kroyt, viola.
Bud apest Quartet Originally Hungarian

By KATHY SEVERANCE
Friday the Budapest String
Quartet will play the first of three
concerts in the 15th annual Cham-
ber Music Festival.
Hailed all over the world as the

.I

The Theosophical Society
in Ann Arbor
presents
A PUBLIC LECTURE
""PERFECTION
OF MAN"
The public is cordially invited.
No admission charge.
WED., FEB. 16 AT 8 P.M.
"HELD OVER"
Meeting Place: 736 South State
(N.W. corner State and Hill)

foremost interpreters of chamber
music, the group, originally with
a full Hungarian membership,
started under the sponsorship of
Prince Esterhazy, a Hungarian
nobleman.
It was this organization which
toured the United States and Eu-
rope in the twenties. In 1927, the
second violinist left and was re-
placed by a Russian. By 1936, there
was not a Hungarian left.
All from Russia
All of the present members of
the quartet are from Russia, and
all of them are American citizens.
Joseph Roisman, the first violin-
ist, is from Odessa, as is Boris
Kroyt, viola player.
Another native of Odessa, sec-
ond violinist Jac Gorodetzky, join-
ed the quartet in 1948 while violin-
cellist Mischa Schneider is from
Vilna.
Since their American debut in
1930, the number of concerts they
give each year has grown from
about 20 to more, than 100 every
season.

Each year since 1938, the quar-
tet has played a long engagement
in the Library of Congress. For
two periods each season, under
the sponsorship of the Gertrude
Clarke Whittall Foundation, the
artists live in Washington, using
the Stradivary instruments given
the Library in 1935.
Not only has the quartet toured
American and Europe many times,
they have also journeyed to Indo-
nesia, North Africa, New Zealand,
and Australia.
Tour of Japan
In 1952, the Budapest String
Quartet made its first tour of
Japan, playing to capacity audi-
ences. They were such a success
they made a second trip to Japan
in 1954.
On their various tours the quar-
tet has found classics always in
great demand. One of their ac-
complishments is the playing of
the Complete Beethoven cycle.
Included on every quartet pro-
gram is at least one contemporary
chamber music work.
Publisher To Talk
On Labor Trends
Publisher and editor of "Detroit
Labor Trends," Stanley H. Brams,
will discuss his two decades of
close experience with labor-man-
agement relations at a meeting of
the Industrial Relations Club, at
7:30 p.m. today, in the student
lounge of the School of Business
Administration.

Lev Says
Living Costs
Might Rise
(Continued from Page 1)
fraternities and sororities are not
expected because of bias clauses in
national constitutions. The clauses
make it impossible for such fra-
ternities to be established here.
Levy's report points out that
residence halls are overcrowded
and have more students living in
them than they were originally
planned to hold. "The Couzens
Hall addition with 250 more spaces
for women, originally scheduled to
be opened next semester, will
probably not be open as originally
planned."
Problems Under Consideration
Two types of problems should be
considered by the groups involved,
the brief points out. They are:
1) What the direct and indirect
effects of the raise on the men
and women of the quadrangles will
be.
2) What the effects of contin-
ued crowding in the University
are, and what a new quadrangle
would mean to the University and
eventually to students.
By speeding up repayment on
present indebtedness, a new build-
ing could be provided for housing
in a little over two 3ears. This
would, help relieve present and
future crowding, Levy's brief says.
If the Board of Governors
should approve a room and board
rate hike, the final decision will
rest with the Board of Regents at
a future meeting.
Taylor Will Seek
Nomination Again
Clair L. Taylor, exofficio mem-
ber of the Board of Regents, will
seek renomination for a second
term as State Superintendent of
Public Instruction at the Republi-
can State Convention Saturday, he
announced yesterday in Lansing.
Major accomplishments during
Taylor's regime included the vol-
untary merging of 500 school dis-
tricts and the building of more
classrooms from local district
funds than at any other time in
history.
Pershing Rifles
To Hold Smoker
Pershing Rifles will hold a smo-
ker at 7:30 p.m. in Rm. 264, Tem-
porary Classroom Building.
The organization's purpose and
activities will be discussed by PR
actives at the informal get-to-
gether.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday). Notice of
lectures, concerts and organization
meetings cannot be published oftener
than twice.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1955
VOL. LXV, No. 89
Notices
Speech Correction for University stu-
dents will again be offered this semes-
ter at the Speech Clinic. Any student
interested in this service please contact
Mr. Adams at the Speech Clinic in
the next few days.
Delta Delta Delta announces its an-
nual scholarship competition Feb. 15
through March 12.
Three scholarships of $120 each are
offered for the benefit of any deserving
women students, independent or af-
filiated, who show evidence of scholas-
tic capability, superior citizenship, and
who have financial need.
l Application forms may be obtained
at the Office of the Dean of Women.
These should be completed and, with
the three specified letters of recom-
mendation, returned to the Dean's of-
fice.
Winners of the competition will be
announced at League Installation
night.
Student Organizations planning to be
active during the second semester must
register in the Office of Student Affairs
not later than Feb. 26. Forms for reg-
istration have been mailed to the ex-
ecutive officer of organizations regis-
tered for the first semester. Additional
forms may be secured in the Office of
Student Affairs, 1020 Administration.
For procedures and regulations re-
lating to student organizations, refer
to University Regulations Concerning
Student Affairs, Conduct, and Disci-
pline available in the Office of Student
Affairs.
Social Events sponsored by student
organizations at which both men and
women are to be present must be reg-
istered in the Office of Student Affairs,
and are subject to approval by the
Dean of Men. Application forms and a
copy of regulations governing these
events may be secured in the Office of
Student Affairs, 1020 Administration
Building. Requests for approval must
be submitted to that office no later
than noon of the Mon. before the event
is scheduled. A list of approved social
events will be published in the Daily
Official Bulletin on Thurs., of each
week.
In planning social programs for the
semester, social chairmen will want to
keep in mind the action of the Com-
mittee on Student Affairs which re-
quires that the calendar be kept clear
of student sponsored activities for the
sevendays prior to a final examination
period. Final examinations for the
present semester begin May 30. For the
spring term the calendar wil be closed
beginning May 23.
All University employees who are not
now members of the U of M Blood
Donor Association, and are interested
in becoming members, should contact
the Personnel Office, 3026 Admin., Ext.
2619, for an appointment. Appointments
must be made on or before Mon., Feb.
21. The Red Cross Mobile Unit will
be at Health Service, Tues, .Feb. 22,
to care for donors.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
Camp Tanuga, Kalkaska, Michigan,
will interview in Room 3G of the Mich-
igan Union Thurs., Feb. 17, from 8:45
a.m. to 4:45 p.m. They need camp
counselors, craft counselors, a doctor
and a nurse. For further information
contact the Bureau of Appointments,
Ext. 2614, Room 3528, Administration
Building.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
The Summer Placement Division of
the Bureau of Appointments will hold7
a meeting Thurs,, Feb. 17 at the Michi-
gan Union in Room 3B from 1:00 - 5:00
p.m. At this time all present summerI

job opportunities listed for 1955 will be
presented.
Continued on Page 4)

FINAL FOUR PERFORMANCES
"The Cocktail Party"
by T. S. Eliot
THURS., FRI., SAT. 8:15 P.M.
SUNDAY MATINEE 2:30 P.M.
Please make reservations early.
STUDENT RATE . . . . . . . . .99
General Admission . * . . . . .' 1.65
DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER

*HEFiEr#

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
1:00 A.M. Saturday

LOST AND FOUND

DID YOU SWAP overcoats? Will the
person who took my brown English
tweed overcoat (Van Boven's) in ex-
change for a similar coat please call
NO 2-4192.
LOST-Circular Pin-1 Inches in
diameter. Leaf design with diamonds
and rubies. Sunday afternoon be-
tween Thayer St. University parking
lot and Ann Arbor High School. Reward
-Call NO 2-8564 between 5 and 7. )71A
LOST--Gold Pin. "Place Vendome" re-
ward. Phone NO 3-2613. )68A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
1951 FORD VICTORIA. Two-tone green.
Radio and heater. Overdrive. 30,000
miles. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )235B
1949 JEEP Station Wagon. Six cylinder
with overdrive. Radio and heater.
The big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )239B
1948 DODGE two-door green, radio,
heater, new tires. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )245B
FOR THE FINEST hi-fidelity music,
hear the new Telefunken; Opus AM,
FM radio. Truly the Cadillac of
radios. Ann Arbor- Radio and TV,
1217 S. University, Ph. NO 8-7942, 1%
blocks east of East Eng. 243B
1950 CHEVROLET two-door blue. Radio
and heater. New tires, new battery.
Completely reconditioned. $495 this
week.,The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )248B
APARTMENT SIZE washing machine.
Takes large load. Reasonable. NO
3-1382. )247B
1950 FORD, two-door V-8. Radio and
heater. Runs perfect. The big lot
across from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )249B
'41 PONTIAC 6, Radio-Heater $90. '47
Pontiac 8, 2 tone green, sharp. Radio-
Heater. $190. "Bob" N 02-9555. )251B
1946 FORD-radio, heater, $150. 1947
BUICK Sedan, radio, heater, $150.
Fitzgerald-Jordan, Inc., 607 Detroit
St., NO 8-8141. )250B
TYPEWRITER and Stand, Royal Stand-
ard A-1 condition, $45.00 Phone NO
2-4308, after 7 P.M. 252B
FOR SALE-Radio, Halacrafter 5x62,
AM-FM, short wave. Phone NO 5-4720
after 4 P.M. )253B
TOWER DRAFTING
EQUIPMENT
Lowes tPrices! Highest Quality!
Precision instruments imported
from Germany.
13 piece side wheel set........5.29
Bean Compass.................6.19
16 piece center wheel set.,... 139
Many other high quality sets
to choose from.
SEARS ROEBUCK AND COMPANY
312 South Main St. Phone NO 2-5501
FOR RENT
PRACTICE GRAND PIANO for rent.
Call NO 2-9810.
CAMPUS AREA. Two men to share
finished basement with grad. student.
Light cooking. $6. 1001 S. Forest. NO
2-7639. )14E
ADVENTURE5
q TRAVL to every tonierfof
the glob ., ,. Europe (60 days,
$650 including steamer), Latn
America, the Orient, Around the
World.
LOW0011 TRIPS by piy.
ce, faitboot, motor, ral for the
adventurous in spirit.
' STUDY TOURS with college
credit In Languages, Art, Music,
Social Studies,.Dance, other
'ubjects. Scholarships avaIlable
SEE MORE-PEND LESS
Your trave Agent OR
4ASteiatS
ITA l7s-
!nod Te Itl A,.
545 fifth Ae. N. T. 1 * MU 2-6544

ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH - Campus
Tourist Home, 518 E. William hear
State). NO 3-8454. Student rooms.
)23D
DOUBLE ROOM, modern furnishings
near campus. 1111 White, NO 2-9625.
)39D
CAMPUS ROOM
For woman.
Call after 4:15 p.m. NO 3-0060.
NEAR HOSPITAL
And campus. Single room for girl. 1000
E. Ann St. Phone NO 8-8130
ONE DOUBLE ROOM, large closet kit-
chen privileges optional. No drinkers
or smokers. For quiet gentlemen.
Near State and Packard-Phone NO
8-8345. )50D
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARDERS WANTED. Any arrange-
ment of meals. Breakfast 30 cents,
lunch 60 cents, dinner $1.20. Call NO
3-5806. )9E
TIRED of Cheeseburgers? Board at
Lester Co-op. 900 Oakland. Call I.C.C.
Office NO 8-68Q~. )13E
BOARDERS WANTED. Good food. Rea-
sonable rates. For information, call
NO 8-8400. )10E
REASONABLE BOARD at a professional
fraternity. Good food. Call House
Manager at NO 2-8312. )11E
PERSONAL
STUDENTS-begin or continue your
piano playing while at college. Artist
teachers-practice facilities. Robert
Dumm Piano Studios, call NO 2-3541.
)54F
FOR J-HOP pictures call Bob Lorey.
NO 2-6436. )60F
SPECIALS on Atlantic Monthly, Holi-
day, Ladies Home Journal, Time, Life,
U.S. News, and many, more. Phone
Student Periodical Agency: NO 2-3061.
MALE ESCORT SERVICE-Reasonable
rates. Have tukedo, will travel. Call
Tom Browne, Lawyers' Club, NO
3-4145. )271
HELP WANTED
WE HAVE ahfew openings for women
21 to 45 who would like to earn extra
dollars evenings. Earnings are un-
limited, work is pleasant. Write Mrs.
Dean, 702 E. Ganson, Jackson, Mich-
igan. )32H
FIELD DIRECTOR -- Girl Scouts of
Southwestern Michigan. Major re-
sponsibility camp and group work
advising. Salary and benefits com-
mensurate with experience. Write
Girl Scouts, 131 East Main St., Benton
Harbor, Mich. Enclose qualifications.
B.S. degree required. )31H

HELP WANTED
STUDENT'S WIFE to work at coffee
shop, 7:30 A.M. to 1 P.M. Monday
thru Friday. Phone NO 8-9402 or
8-6087. )34H
TRANSPORTATION
EUROPE $399-30 day 5400 mile auto
tour 7 countries. Free insurance and
NTC membership. As leader ydu may
qualify for transportation free tour.
TEMPLEMAN TOURS, 337 W. Mason,
Jackson, Michigan.
)6G
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Wool
sox washed also. )81
R. A. MADDY--VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs.310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)101
BABY OR SMALL CHILD for day care
in licensed home. NO 3-5830. 231
TYPING WANTED-reasonable rates.
Mrs. Mullet, .726 S. Main NO 8-6883.
)22I
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALTY
NO 2-7787
for 2-3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
'Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20

f

Dailly
Classifieds
Bring
Quick
Results

Dial NO 2-3136
For Schedule
Information

Lrt Ig~Ma tinees 65c

"Fine film! Vigorous large-scale outdoor drama!" --Journal-American

327 S. Fourth Ave.

NO 2-5915

THIS EVENING
YOUNG DEMOCRATS
ELECTIONS
MICHIGAN LEAGUE 7:30
also hear-
"THE INVESTIGATION"
A Satire on a Certain Junior Senator from the Midwest

MIXER

For Grad Students and University Personnel
FRIDAY, February 18
Paul McDonough and his band
Rackham Assembly Hall 9-12
50c

4-

III

ail

COO-PER .LXlKN CXS)(;
'VRXCRUZ"
aA HAROLD HECHT presentation o-stn TECHNICOWOR
DENISE DARCEL CESARROMERO
ALSO
Pete Smith Color World
Novelty Cartoon News
COMING! SPENCER TRACY in "Bad Day at Black Rock"

A1

I

NOW

Cw MICHIGAN

Matinees 50c
Nights 80c

'I

r

An Opportunity
A representative of the Warner
& Swasey Company, leading
manufacturers of machine
tools, and other precision ma-
chinery, will visit the University
of Michigan on -Monday, Feb-
ruary 21, to interview high
caliber men with technical
backgrounds or mechanical in-
terests who are interested in an
industrial career in sales, man-
ufacturing, engineering, fi-
nance, etc.
This medium-sized company
i~f4-& - in ..rn..r% no-.

It

I

'7a " 'I trVAAhA t : tir:2 ?"i fi .

- i

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