100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 16, 1955 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 16, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIMER

WThNESDAY. FEBRUARY 16. 1955 TilE MICHIGAN IJAILY PAGE THREE

Eight Teams Qualify for I-irst lace P

layoffs

Cinder Relay
Team Enters
AAU Meet
Michigan track coach Don Can-
ham has accepted an invitation to
enter his two-mile relay team in
the National AAU meet at Madison
Square Garden Saturday.
Canham expects John Moule,
'Pete Gray, Hobe Jones, and Laird
Sloan to represent the Wolverines,
who will be making their first ap-
'pearance in the Garden since 1952.
Landstrom to Vault
Freshman E e le s Landstrom,
Michigan's Finnish pole vaulter,
will compete as an unattached en-
try in this event, headed by Par-
son Bob Richards, a consistent 15-
doot vaulter.
Gunnar Nielsen, the Dane who
holds the world indoor mile rec-
'ord of 4:03.6, will also be on the
scene.
Nielsen, whose visa expires on'
Feb. 25, will head back to his
pressman's job in Denmark after
Saturday's mile race.
"Just trying to win is tough
enough," the redhead said. "But
'going after a world record week
after week has taken too much
out of me. I need a rest."
Besides Nielsen, Wes Santee and
Fred Dwyer will be among the top
,contenders in a pack of 14 entries.
.(Minnesota Ice
Coach To Guide
Olyic sTeam
g' MINNEAPOLIS - (M) - Johnny
Mariucci, hockey coach at the Uni-
versity of Minresota, was named
yesterday as the coach of the 1956
United States Olympic hockey
team..
Minnesota athletic officials said
the University's Board of Regents
had granted Mariucci a leave of
absence from Dec. 26, 1955 to
March 15, 1956. Mariucci will
coach the Minnesota team from
the start of practice in November
next season to the time he takes
over as coach of the United States
team.
Duluth was chosen as the train-
ing site for the team. The 1956
Olympic ice hockey competition
will be in Italy.
BIG TEN STANDINGS

Sigma Chi, ATO, Phi Delts
Sweep to Easy Cage Wins
4'

MIKE BUCHANAN NEIL BUCHANAN
. . . welcome addition . . . slow start
Buchanan TEwins Join

Forces on Hockey Team
By JUD-°" CANTOR
By JD CATORship, and outdid themselves on
On March 1, 1932, in Saulte Ste. hockey team. This, to them,
Marie, Ontario, a pair of husky one of the memorable events
blond twins, Neil and Mike Bu- their sporting career, being1
chanan, kicked their way into the realization of a childhood am
world, and they've been battling tion.
ever since with the only exception Body-Checking Bugaboo
being that their energy has now They both played a bit of ba
been transferred to the hockey ball and some golf, but the b
rink. contact in hockey made this ga
Mike is the older of the two by their major choice. However, t
twenty minutes. However, young- have found that they are limi
er brother Neil is the veteran of in this respect in the Uni
the family, already having two se- States. Formerly they were
mesters of competition under his lowed to body-check anywhere
belt. Mike is just now beginning the ice, but here this is alloy
his first, having been inactive due only behind their own blue li
to eligibility rules. They have thought about c
The Buchanans are the only set tinuing hockey after graduat
o twins at this time competing but as yet are undecided. B
for the University with the excep- boys are juniors in the school
tion of Bert and Jack Wardrop, Business Administration.
swimming stars, who hail from
Scotland.
A Slow Start Haney a
According to Coach Vic Heylig-
er, Neil has been somewhat of a A
disappointment on the team this SI UI .n
year, having gotten off to a slow
start in the scoring co'-mn, but he By DAVE RORABACHER
has shown some imprevement, and Don Haney remains as the o
Hayliger still has high hopes for undefeated member of MichigE
him. wrestling team as a result of
"Mike," Heyliger continued, "in smashing 24-5 loss to Iowa'
the short mime he has been playing, Saturday.
has shown great potential, being Haney, a junior who is gene
a fine competitor and a hard work- ly conceded to be the most pr
er, and will eventually become an ising wrestler on the Wolve
outstanding defenseman. He did squad, managed to decision H
well in his first two game-, and he. lan Jenkinson, 6-4, to extend
is a good puck carrier. However, season's winning streak to . f
he does need to develop a better not including his victory in
shot, and tends to become overly Wilkes-Barre meet.
aggressive at times. (Ask Dario Big Surprise
Nicoli.) The big surprise in the m
Early in their youth, the twins was Captain- Andy Kaul's loss
moved to Ottawa, an-' began their Hawkeye Jerry Salmon. Previ
ice career at the age of five. They
played in minor leagues between ;.m:..:........
the ages of nine and sixteen. At
this time, they both entered St.
Michael's of Toronto on a scholar- _

its
wvas
in
the
nbi-
se-
ody
ame
hey
ited
ited
al-
on
awed
ine.
on-
ion,
oth
I of

By JIM BAAD
Eight teams clinched first place
play-off berths and six others
wound up solidly in contension for
second in Fraternity "A" Basket-
ball games last night at the I-M
Building.
Last years' champs, Sigma Chi,
put themselves in position for an-
other title by beating Kappa Sig-
ma, 58-26. Sigma Chi's big ad-
vantage was in their control of
the boards and the sharp-shoot-
ing of Chuck Brooks, who threw
in 15 points.
ATO Triumphs
Alpha Tau Omega, by applying
a tight zone and a fasthbreak
smashed the hopes of Alpha Phi
Alpha, by winning, 39-20.. Foot-
baller Lou Baldacci was high for
the victors with 13 points.
Pi Lambda Phi had to sweat for
their place among the playoff
elite as they barely slid by Delta
Tau Delta with a last second
technical foul shot and won, 31-
30. Pi Lambda Phi overcame a
five point deficit with only a few
minutes to play before Bill Pitt-
ler sunk the deciding free shot.
Pittler was also high for his team
with 12 points.
With a roster of varsity football
players and some timely shooting,
Phi Delta Theta, easily beat Chi
Phi, 36-20. Jim Bates and Jerry
Goebel flipped in 12 and 13 points
respectively for the winners.
Phi Kappa Psi Wins
Phi Kappa Psi, behind Jack Gal-
lander's 24 points, swept into first
place play-off contention by
downing Tau Kappa Epsilon, 48-
20.

Neither Lambda Chi Alpha nor
Phi Kappa Sigma had to work
and worry over a play off berth
because neither of their oppo-
nents showed up. Both Triangle
and Phi Kappa Sigma were else-
where last night.
Sigma Alpha Mu and Theta Chi
staged the most impressive con-
test of the evening, each fight-
ing for a second place play-off
spot. Both teams see-sawed back
and forth on the scoring cards, un-
til with about four minutes to go,
Warren Wertheimer pushed in a
one-handed set shot from the key,
putting the Sammy's one point in
the lead. This was the last basket
of the game and the SAM's tri-
umphed, 34-33.
Tau Delts Roll
Tau Delta Phi also gained a
second-place play-off berth in
high-flying style. The Tau Delt's
started off quickly against Acacia
and breezed to a 35-0 half-time
lead. Their defense dragged after
the intermission and they only
managed to win, 48-6. Sharp-
shooting Chuck Baraf was high in
the contest with 22 markers.
Although no play-off was at
stake, the most sparkling individ-
ual performance came in Phi Kap-
pa Tau's win over Psi Upsilon, 50-
33. Rex Youse flipped in one-hand-
er after one-hander for the Phi
Kappa Tau's and bagged 32 coun-
ters for his team.
Other scores were Alpha Epsi-
lon Pi 57, Delta Sigma Phi 22;
Phi Sigma Kappa 48, Theta Xi 33;
and Sigma Phi 40, Alpha Sigma
Phi 24.

NICK WIESE, Michigan's unbeaten sophomore flying rings ace,
shows the form that labels him as one of Newt Loken's top
prospects.
Unbeaten Wiese Shows
Ability on Flying Rings

ins Only Undefeated Wrestler
ree-Year String Is Smashed.

By DAVE GREY
Nick Wiese, outstanding sopho-
more on Michigan's gymnastic
squad, is rapidly becoming one of
the best gym prospects to grace the
Wolverine scene in a long time.
"Within another year, Wiese will
be among the best," says Coach
Newt Loken in referring to the
fine work done by the Holland-
born 1hysical Education major. On
the flying rings, Wiese is unbeat-
en in four meets this season, and
has also been placing consistent-
ly on the high bar an' in tumbling.
He ranks first on the Wolverine
team in the rings, second behind
senior Frank Adams in tumbling,
and second or third in the high
bar event.
All-Around Star
Loken expects the high flying
Wiese to be a top all-around man
at least by his senior year, and in
anticipation of this, the Michigan
coach will enter Wiese in the Big
Ten all-around event at the con-
ference meet coming up in March.
Born in Alkmaar, Holland, Wiese
arrived in the United States about
four years ago, : nd .now lives with
his family in Goshen, Indiana. It
was while teaching at a camp at
Syracuse, Indiana, several sum-
mers ago that Wiese met his fu-
ture teacher, Loken, and thereby
gained an rportunity to visit
Michigan. He entered in the fall
of 1953 as a freshman at the age
of 17.
Wiese has been working at gym-

nastics since he was seven years
old. A need to correct a childhood
rounded-back condition started
him on the road to gymnastic
laurels.
New Tricks Come Fast
He admits however, that he
"had no love for gymnastics" un-
til he discovered that he was one
of the lucky few 'yho "could do
certain tricks." He has been learn-
ing new stunts ever since, especial-
ly this past season.
A cheerleader, an activity which
keeps many gymnasts in shape
during the fall, Wiese is working
hard to put himself through
school. The friezdly - natured,
handsomely-built athlete has par-
ticularly won respect for his sin-
cere, co-operative, and hardwork-
ing attitude in gymnastics.
Wiese was among the four man
team that represented Michigan at
the extensive gym clinic held in
Florida over Christmas vacation.
He was further honored by being
picked by c-aches and clinic off i-
cials to compete in the all-star
North-South meet, won by his
North squad.
BASKETBALL SCORES
NBix
Boston 106, Milwauke 103 (over-
time)
Philadelphia 114, Rochester 113
College
Rice 80, Baylor 68
St. Louis 99, Arkansas 72
Adrian 64, Olivet 53

Kramer Still
Holds Down
Center Slot
By JOHN HILLYER
Michigan basketball coach Bill
Perigo announced yesterday that
he is sticking with Ron Kramer as
first-string center, at least tem-
porarily.
"Kramer will stay at center,"
Perigo emphasized. "He's proven
to me that he can play pivot in
the Big Ten, although Williams
(Harvey Williams, 6-8 center, who
became temporarily ineligible be-
cause of a scholastic deficiency),
who should be ready for Minnesota
Sature ay, may be of some use
against 3il Simonovich, their 6-
10 pivot man."
Kramer Stars
It was Kramer who played the
major role in upsetting North-
western's Wildcats, 72-70, Monday
night in one of the most thrilling
finishes of the current Big Ten
season. His 28 points led both
teams, and his clutch basket, with
less than five -econds to play, won
the game before a thrilledcrowd
of 4,000 at Yost Field House.
Thus the Wolverines, Big Ten
doormats for the past several
years, emerged into a tie for fourth
place, with hopes of at least re-
maining in the first division
throughout the remainder of the
campaign.
About the Northwestern game,
Coach Perigo stated, "We didn't
play nearly as well as a unit as we
did against Illinois. It was Kra-
mer, of course, who kept us in the
game; no question about it."
Defense the Problem
"The kids have been playing
much better ball," Perigo contin-
ued. "As long as the defense will
hold, I feel certain that our of-
fense can pile up enough points
to win. Our big improvement has
been on defense. I thought Lingle
did an excellent job of guarding
Ehmann, their high-scoring for-
ward, and Kramer did as good a
job on Grant as has been done on
him all year."
As for the future, the coach
stated, "We've got the three.top
teams to play yet. That would fit
into the picture, definitely." This
includes two games with Iowa, plus
a home tilt with Minnesota and a
road game at Illinois. "I certainly
am hoping for a first-division fin-
ish, however," Perigo safd.

nly to this Kaul was carrying a fab-
an's ulous win record that began nearly
nits three years ago at the beginning
last of his sophomore year and totaled
over thirty consecutive dual meet
ral- victories. Last year he also won
om- the 137 pound Big Ten title and
rine garnered fourth place in the
lar- NCAA tourney.
his Iowa's victories in the lowest
ive, two weight classes were to be ex-
the pected as their stars Dick Govig
and Terry McCann are both unde-
feated this year and are perhaps
neet
s to LATE HOCKEY SCORE
ious Detroit 3, Chicago 2

among the best to be found in col-
legiate wrestling. Govig, who has
been held to a draw twice, is the
defending NCAA champ.
Assistant Coach Bob Betzig at-
tributed the loss to a slightly
cocky attitude resulting from un-
derestimating the Hawkeyes' po-
tency and a too light dismissal of
the loss to Illinois.
On the other hand Head Coach
Cliff Keen thought that the de-
feat was due in part to the better
conditioning of the Iowa squad.

Minnesota .......
Iowa ........«...
Slinois .........
Michigan State ..*
Northwestern ....
MICMIGAN ..«.
Wisconsin .......
v Indiana .........
Ohio State .......
Purdue ....--....

8
7
6
5
5
4
3
3
3

2
2
3
5
5
4
6
6
7
7

.800
.778
.667
.500
.500
.500
.333
.333
.300
.300

m

ALL NEW ILUCKY DROODLES!
- ---- - - - -- - .- - - ---- -

-

.,

WHAT'S THIS? For solution see paragraph below.

SPORTS
PHIL DOUGLIS
Night Edisor

Ladies Haircutting--
styled to please you!!
-cut the way you want it
vhen you want it-
Tfhe Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatrel

REAR VIEW OF HENRY Vill ON THRONE
Galen R. Fisher
University of California

'U1.

WILDS WILDS WILDS WILDS WILDS
The Slim Look in Slacks

Ivy-Als by Wild's

t

G-
r~
t-
r
C7
U)
I-
0V
I-
,Q
2)
r-
OV

OUT

I

I

A STUDENT'S BEST FRIEND is Lucky
Strike. At any rate, the greatest,
up-to-datest college survey shows
that college smokers prefer
Luckies to all other brands-and
by a wide margin. Once again,
the No. 1 reason: Luckies taste
better. They taste better, first of
all, because Lucky Strike means
fine tobacco. Then, that tobacco
is toasted to taste better. "It's
Toasted"-the famous Lucky
Strike process-tones up Luckies'
light, good-tasting tobacco to
make it taste even better. Luckies
taste better anywhere, any time,
as illustrated in the Droodle

- - - - -

T-i

7

F

u

FRONT OF STORE
SELLING ELEVATED SHOES
Robert E. Collum 1.1
Adelphi

mmmmmm

above, titled: Skier enjoying
Lucky while whooshing under
bridge. Next time you make tracks
to a cigarette counter, Be Happy
-Go Lucky. Enjoy the better-
tasting cigarette... Lucky Strike.

Our new Vanelin

Sportshirt

o- *~""s ""-.*.

Today's new "Look of Linen" in new
"Continental Colors." Washes easy as 1-2-3.
Looks like a million. Costs five bucks!

....

FIREPOLE IN CITY WHERE
MAYOR'S BROTHER OWNS PIPE FACTORY
William C. Jankowski, Jr.
Boston University

s
"
t
s
"

00 1
"

",rfoAr

r7

luGCr :
STRI

Tf tYY

;a.

r.,:M ., .: :'::
.. SItJE~~a L.

RM

VAN

HEU

S

EN

°

1%6

The difference in measurements gives the slacks an
entirely new slim silhouette. Knee measurements are
reduced to 21"s cuff measurements to 18" . . an

STORE

H O U RS

D A I L Y

9 TO 5

4 " s f

0
Lucky Droodles* are pouring in! Where
-- ..-"4 mWn .-40-; fr, al..,p .- - ad

-7']
' .r:'

i'«:l Y+'i.:%rM.Y::.:i+iCii%.ii'r'viil
;,:,: ;
. 9 L;r J .
_::.
:: S y{+ %' ....
:f

I

1

-- I

I II

I .E

I

i

:k

II

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan