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February 11, 1955 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-11

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIREW:

rUIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAC~ TRRU~t

-V &1 Z 111Y L L'

W

No Natural Lyric So
TL ui To ,'U Frances Greer, lyric so
.EA..1J olecturer in voice in the
Music, will give her firs
bor concert at 8:30 p.m
SiZe - S I Lydia Mendelssohn The
Miss Greer sung with t
"There are no natural limits to politan and Philadelph
the size of the Upiversity," accord- Companies, before joinin
ing to Dean Willard C. Olson of sic school faculty last S
the School of Education. Her musical career span
Disagreeing with those who feel quarter of a century, s
increased enrollment means less her native Helena, Ark.,
effective education, Dean Olson sang in a Tom Thumb v
remarked "As long as the Univer- Before her graduat
sity can multiply classrooms, hous- Louisiana State Unive
ing, staff, administrative skill and had appeared in numeroi
finance it all, there's no point at roles including suchc
which we can stop and say this
is By continuing to differentiate Alpha Ph]*
programs, Dean Olson explained,
higher education can meet theDRe e
needs of more people. Criticism D ay eel
eof large college enrollments are
based on a desire to "turn back Referring to Mayor V
the clock" to the education of an Brown's denial of perm
elite minority. the proposed Alpha Phi
"Admission standards are as Association Tag Day, Bet
high as they ever have been. There lesong, president of tid
are Just more students," Univer- said that she considered
sity Vice-President Marvin L. Nie- dent "humiliating an
huss observed. handled."
He pointed out that, without Permission to go ahea
lowering its standards, the Uni- plans had been given by
versity grows as- the numbers of or's office in his absenc
college-age people grow. first that the Association
"There's no lessening in the de- the refusal was in the n
mand for people with college de- after Monday's Council n
grees," Vice-President Niehuss re- "We are not bittera
marked. "Instead there is need revokal," the sorority off
for more." "But I wish that we had
formed personally rathe
Officers Elected this humiliating manner.
The Association hadc
Recently elected officers of the its plans for the Tag D
French Club are president, Mar- was scheduled for thi.
jorie Greenfield, '56; vice-presi- Monday, and was force
dent, Elinor Kahn, '56; secretary, the executive secretary o
Lee Joseph, '57; and treasurer, Ed chigan Heart Association
Irvine, '55. plans had been cancelled
for VALENTINE'S DAY...Mo
VALENTINE
HEART BOXES
A wonderful array of chocolates packed in
pper or satin-covered heart boxes-in sizes
ganging from 4 ounces to 5 pounds.
50 CUP8.50
COMPLETE VALENTINE GIFT SELECTION INCLUDES
fruit and Nut Hearts " Valentine Kiddie Boxes
olded Chocolate Hears Novelty Condies

prano To Give Concert Today

prano and
School of
t Ann Ar-
. today in
atre.
he Metro-
hia Opera
.g the mu-
September.
s nearly a
tarting in
,when she
wedding.
ion from
rsity, she
us soprano
operas as
Tag
ted
William E.
ission for
Alumnae
ty C. Fog-
.e group,
the nci-
d poorly
d with the
the may-
e, and the
heard of.
ewspapers
meeting.
about the
ficial said.
been in-
r than in
completed
lay which
s coming
ed to tell
of the Mi-
that the
d.

"Carmen," "Madame Butterfly',"
"Faust" and "La Traviata."
European tours and charter
membership in the Philadelphia
Opera Company preceded her ca-
reer with the Met. Miss Greer
made her Metropolitan Opera de-
but as Musetta in "La Boheme"
Nov. 30, 1942. She stayed at the
Met until 1951.
Appears as Soloist
After leaving her operatic ca-
reer, Miss Greer appeared as solo-
ist with leading symphony orches-
tras throughout the United States.
She also had a radio program for
two and a half years, spent sum-
mers on the operetta circuit and
made recordings.
Before coming to the Univer-
sity, she taught privately for three
years in New York. Although she
is teaching, she still wants to give
concerts and has recently ap-
peared in Battle Creek and in
Grand Rapids. A Grand Rapids
music critic said of her concert
that "Miss Greer has an unerring
sense of how just to sing a song,
whatever its proportions and text.
Hers is a warm, radiant voice, ev-
en in quality and always the serv-
ant of the song."
Included on her program today
G&S Sets 'Iolanthe'
Tryouts at League
Tryouts will be held for the new
Gilbert and Sullivan production of
"Iolanthe" at 7 p.m. today through
Sunday at 7 p.m. at the League.
Auditions will also be held Sat-
urday and Sunday afternoons at
2 p.m. in the League.
Those interested in production
work should call Dave Morgan at
NO 3-8249.

Regents Make
Appointments
Kent W. Leach was appointed
director of the University Bureau
of School Services, effective March
1, at the January meeting of the
Board of Regents.
Leach has been with the Bureau
since January 1949. He started as
a consultant and was named as-
sistant director July 1, 1952.
Kenneth F. Gordon, a labora-
tory supervisor from San Jose,
Calif., was appointed assistant pro-
fessor of chemical engineering in
the engineering college beginning
this semester, through the end of
the 1956-57 school year.
Appointed assistant professors
of epidemiology in the School of
Public Health were Keith E. Jen-
son and Kenneth Cochran.
Dr. George Henry Keopke was
appointed as assistant professorj
in the department of physical me-
dicine and rehabilitation in the
Medical School.
Appointed as assistant professor
of dentistry in the Dental School
was Dr. Jerome J. Hiniker, chief
of the dental services of the Ann
Arbor Veterans Administration
hospital.

Colonial American song books
on display in Clements Library
testify, contrary to current ideas,
that music played an important
role in early American life.
The exhibit, a collection of folk
songs, church music and instruc-'
tional folders, was selected from
the library's collection by Prof. Al-
len P. Britton of the School of
Music, an authority on early Am-
erican music, for the American
Musicological Societyconvention
recently held in Ann Arbor.
Most of the scores were printed
for either school or church use.
Currently popular words, usually
folk tales or scriptures, were set
to popular melodies of the time;
also in the display, are short
compositions by American con-
Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

Colonial American Music on Exhibit

posers and songs brought to Am- even today in sections of the
erica by settlers of diverse nation- South. The melodies found in the
alities. library's tune books are still be-
Early musical customs prevail ing sung.
for that Special omeone
SEND FLOWERS
on Valentine's Day
QJOt. FLOWERS
oieud GIFTS
334 S. State Phone NO 3-5049
Classical Ballet Trai1111 OF DANCE
Kinderballet Through
Professional SYLVIA HAMER
Ta) Adagio CYCoA E
Acrobatic Character

FRANCES GREER
. A..Lyric Sopranist
will be works by Purcell, Weill,
Hahn, Poulenc, Ravel and Villa-
Lobos. Her concert will be broad-
cast over WUOM directly from the
stage of Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre.
Accompanying Miss Greer will
be Eugene Bossart, head bf the
music school's accompanying de-
partment.
Bossart is a graduate of the
Curtis Institute of Music in Phila-
delphia.
The public may attend Miss
Greer's concert free of charge.

r IS
ttie hox and
%r skoofypi &re~

she'll be

AKg)
I3.
N ~ I'4

y FCANDY
Mday, February 14th

u

Favorite Selectionf amily Assortment
A tempting vretyof milkand dark A choice selection of chocolates
chocolates, attractively wrapped. , with soft and chewy centers
1-LB. 1-LB.
BOX BOX 1*3
332 S. STATE STREET
Open Sunday, Feb. 13th - 11 A.M.-4 P.M.

75
Nothing more to buy-nothing more to learn-you
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With the famed Argus 75, world's easiest camera
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And you get the plug-in flash unit, batteries, flash
bulbs, flash guard, and film. You're instantly ready to
go-indoors or out, color or black-and-white! Come
in and see it today!
ONLY $1 95 COMPLETE
Purchase Camera Shop

Bribe aEheart, any heart and
snare it with TICKLED PINK -a
surprise-pink stocking by Phoenix-
for all the new pale, p a r t y and
potent pinks of Spring. Give it and
she's yours-wear it and you're
y his. Comes packed in a beautiful
Valentine box wearing a pink
feather caught in a lace heart.
1.35 to 1.95
ON FOREST OFF SOUTH U. AND1
-, +«
t"" .. - '4 a' uu .Y"? '.,.Y'y S '. """ ;Cr ,

1111 SOUTH U.

i

1116 South University

Phone NO 8-6972

"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"

.5

'Rom

tastes good-

iIke a cigarette should!

1. 'C QN

-SAN DLE R OF BOSTON ELASTICIZES THE COLLAR OF

I r

I

SA;LR:F:SO4EATCZEaU OLA Fua . .*: r 'te

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