100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 09, 1955 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1955

THE MICHIGAN MA1LY

PAC'sk VIVR

WEDNESAY, FERUARY9,j195 0AI~LKaU~J

rnkr. ivr

14

Brotherhood Banquet
To Be Given by SRA

"Only the Brave Are Brothers"'
is the title of the annual Brother-
hood Banquet to be held Feb. 22
at Lane Hall.
Tickets for the banquet, spon-
sored by the Student Religious
Association, are $1 and may be'
purchased by any student. In pre-
vious years the banquet could be
attended only by specified groups
or by special invitation.
The speaker for the evening
will be Rev. Samuel Gandy, for-
mer president of the American
Association of College and Univer-
sity Chaplains. Father Gandy is
-r

I-

dt:Po,'44 Carnl/u4

JUNIOR PANHEL-Junior Pan-
hel meeting will be held at 4:30
p.m. today at the League.
RIDING CLUB - The Riding
Club will hold an organizational
meeting at 5:15 p.m. today in the
WAB. New members are welcome.
* * *
JGP-There will be a meeting of
the JGP properties committee at
7 p.m. today in the League.
* * *
MICHIFISH - Michifish mem-
bers will meet at 7:15 p.m. today
at the pool.
* . *
RIFLE CLUB-The Rifle Club
will hold an organizational meet-
ing at 7:30 p.m. today in the WAB.
* * *
JUNIOR MICHIFISH - There
will be a Junior Michifish meeting
at 8:15 p.m. today at the Women's
Swimming Pool. Interested Co-eds
are invited to attend.
BURO-CATS -A meeting for
all League Buro-cats will be held
at 5 p.m. tomorrow in the League.
'Ensian picture will be taken.
* *-*
BOWLING--There will be open
bowling for women from 7 to 9
p.m. tomorrow, Monday and Tues-
day at the WAB. This may be used
as practice for the bowling tourna-
ment beginning Tuesday, Feb. 22.
HILLELZAPOPPIN-There will
be a meeting at 7:15 p.m. tomor-
row at Hillel, 1429 Hill, for all
women interested in working on
the independent coed skit for
"Hillelzapoppin."

now director of religious activities
at Virginia State College, Peters-
burg, Virginia.
Seminar Planned
A three day seminar, Feb. 22,
Feb. 23, and Feb. 24 at Lane Hall,
will follow the Brotherhood Ban-
quet. No tickets are needed for the
seminar.
The first program will include
Father Gandy who will speak on
"The Supreme Court Decision, a
Year Later." Edward Voss, grad-
uate economics student at the Uni-
versity will also be a speaker for
the afternoon session. Interpreta-
tions of the topic under discussion
will be given by the speakers; a
general discussion will follow.
"Campus Realism on Brother-
hood," a lecture on the Brother-
hood situation at the University,
will be given by Father Gandy,
Wednesday, Feb. 23. Prof. George
Peek, of the political science de-
partment will speak on present
student relationships.
Educator to Speak
Thursday's afternoon program
will include Father Gandy who will
discuss "Progress in Intergration
in Education" in his last lecture.
Jack Elzay, superintendant of
schools in Ann Arbor, will talk on
the problem of Negro and White
integration.
Lane Hall officials hope that the
discussions at the banquet and se-
minar will help the realistic stu-
dent look at progress and integra-
tion between Negroes and Whites
in democratic measures.

-Daily-John Hirtzel
"TAKE IT AND LEAVE IT SHELF"-League Library has added
another "ervice which permits students to take a pocketbook in
exchange for another. Current and old editions of fiction, non-
fiction books and periodicals are now available to students at
the library.
Pocketbook Exchange Shelf
Added to Library Facilities

Union Slates
2 Meetings
For Tryouts
Officers To Explain
Positions, Activities
Of Major Committees
At mass meetings at 7:30 p.m.
today and 4 p.m. tomorrow, men
students interested in joining the
Union staff will be informed of
activities of the various commit-
tees by Union President Tom Leo-
pold and other executive staff
members.
All students will have opportun-
ities to participate actively in the
Union program for the coming se-
mester. After one semester at the
Union, tryouts will be able to be-
come office managers.
Students who wish to partici-j
pate on the campus affairs com-
mittee will handle such projects3
as Orientation Week, University
Day, Junior College Day and the
Hatcher Open Houses.
Public Relations
Publicity, publication of the
"'M' Handbook" and dormitory
and fraternity talks will be un-
der the direction of the public re-
lations committee.
The dance committee handles
all Union mixers, Saturday night
dances, Little Club dances and en-
tertainment with the League.
Tryouts who wish to participate
on the personnel and administra-
tion committee will have charge of
Union membership cards and but-
tons and the tryout training pro-
gram. The Union social commit-
tee helps produce Gulantics, the
all-campus talent revue.
Publicity Committee
Publicity committee tryouts will
work with reporters from "The
Daily. Sale of football and con-1
cert and lecture seriestickets along
with ducats for Union theater trips
will be the responsibility of the
student services committee.
Refreshments will be served at
the meeting, and the men will
have opportunity to ask questions.
Attendance at the meeting does
not obligate anyone to become a
member.

By ROSE PERLBERG
Cinemascope, orlon, the H-
Bomb-- these familiar words we
never heard about 20 years ago.
Looking back aver the events
that have changed the tempo and
texture of our lives during the last
20 years, the editor of w national
magazine consulted several crys-
tal-ball makers to find out what's
in store for us 20 years hence.
Although they may now seem
inconceivable, here are a few pre-
dictions.
We will no -anger suffer ex-
hausting shopping excursions. Full
color fashions, possibly in 3-D,
will come right into the home,
through the medium of televi-
sion. A push of a button, and the
order will be transmitted directly
to the store. The TV shopper will
have much more variety in cloth-
ing. Every little store will be able
to carry goods from even the re-
motest corner of the globe.
Students of tomorrow may just-
ly be walking around in a continu-
al daze. Future educators plan to
use hypnosis to speed up the ab-
sorption of information.

The field of electronics is play-
ing an increasingly important role
in our lives. Scientists promise
even greater feats for tomorrow.
The parking problem will easily be
solved with moving strips and
punched cards. All accounting and
record keeping will be accomplish-
ed automatically by electronic de-
vices.
Sky Advertising
"The sky's the limit," so the
saying goes. Advertisers plan to
make it their billboard. New lights
200 times greater in intensity than
anything now used will enable sky-
writing at night.
Remarkable advances in travel
over the last 20 years show great
prospects for the future. Jet
planes will be whisking people all
over the world, landing them at
their destination even before
they're scheduled to take off!
In the home, all heating and
lighting will be invisible, without
any fixtures. Most of the food we
eat will be packaged. Wood will
become increasingly important --
as a source of synthetic food.
The trend toward more leisure

Green's

is here already. Twenty years from
now the four-day week will be
commonplace. One of our major
national problems will be the cre-
ative use of our leisure time. Ar-
ticles for recreation and hobbies
will be one of the most important
items in stores' stocks.

TWENTY YEARS HENCE:
Leisurely Living Trend Foreseen

University of Michigan

-s

WAA BlazerSale
WAA University of Michigan
blazers will go on sale from 1
to 5 p.m..tomorrow at the wom-
en's pool.
..Orders will be taken at this
time, with the sale continuing
from 19 a.m.' to 5 p.m. Friday.
A $5 deposit is due when the
order is placed, and the remain-
der of the money is to be paid
when the jackets arrive.
The blazers come in two
styles-one of heavy flannel in
navy blue, oxford gray and
white and the other of shet-
land tweed in white only. Both
blazers are fully lined.
Personal fittings will be made,
with no extra charge for alter-
ations.

Facilities for study and leisure
reading are not forgotten in the
social whirl provided by the
League.
The League Library, which con-'
tains a wide variety of fiction, non-
fiction books, current magazines
and pamphlets, is reserved for
women students.
Opening hours for the library
are from 9 a.m. to noon, 1:30 to
5:30 p.m. and 7 to 10 p.m. Monday1
through Thursday; 9 a.m. to noon
and 2 to 5:30 p.m. Friday and 2
to 5 p.m. and 7 to 10 p.m. Sunday.
The library is not open Saturday.
One new attraction is "the take
it and leave it shelf." Students
may take a pocketbook from the
shelf in exchange for another one
which the student leaves in its
place.
Students who prefer listening to
classical music while studying

may use three music listening
rooms. The rooms are furnished
with modern chairs, tables, and
lamps. Recordings are piped into
each room from the central turn-
table in the League Library.
The music listening rooms are
in the memory of the late Barba-
ra J. Little.
Opening hours of the music
room will be the same as those of
the League Library.
JGP Tryouts
Tryouts for the 1955 JGP,
"Cock-a-Hoop," will1be con-
ducted from 4 to 5:30 p.m. to-
day through Saturday and from
7 to 10 p.m. today through Fri-
day. All junior coeds are invit-
ed to try out for parts in the
show.

f'

BLAZERS
Sponsored by WAA

Oxford Grey, Navy, and White Flannel
also, White Shetland Wool
SALES OPEN TO PUBLIC

i
.
I

:r 'i

!'

A.

Orders taken
THURSDAY 1 to 5
FRIDAY 10 to 5
at New Women's Pool

7

__. -- _._ _ - y 1

~. (Author of "Barefoot Bob/ With Cheek," 0oc.)

'Aw"

Perfume for your Valentine
0
Choose from such famous fragrance
lines as Lanvin, Guerlain, Gourielli,
Schiaperelli, Caron, and many others.
GIFT WRAPPING AT ,NO EXTRA CHARGE
Q 0
320 SOUTH STATE STREET PHONE 2-3109
!1 <-) > Ct=O <= }C)Go<=0> Y'n (C".C

THE TREEHOUSE OF THE AUGUST MOON
Spring is just around the corner, and with spring, as always,
will come tree-sitting contests. This I applaud. Tree-sitting is
healthful and jolly and as American as apple pie. Also it keeps
you off the streets.
Tree-sitting is not, however, without its hazards, as you will
presently see when I tell you the dread and chilling tale of
Manuel Sigafoos and Ed Pancreas.
Manuel and Ed, friends and room-mates, were walking one day
past the folk music room in the School of Dentistry and Fine
Arts. Suddenly they stopped, for coming through the door of
the folk music room was a clear and thrilling alto voice singing
the lovely folk tune, I Strangled My True-Love with Her Own
Yellow Braids, and I'll Never Eat Her Sorghum Any More.
When the last shimmering notes of the ballad had died away,
Manuel and Ed rushed into the room, and there they thought
their swelling hearts must burst asunder. For the singer was as
beautiful as the song! Fair as the morn she was, doe-eyed and
curvilinear.
"My name is Manuel Sigafoos," cried Manuel Sigafoos, "and
I love you madly, wildly, tempestuously!"
"My name is Ed Pancreas," cried Ed Pancreas, "and I love
you more than Manuel Sigafoos."
"My name is Ursula Thing," cried the girl, "and I've got
a jim-dandy idea. Why don't you two have a contest, and I will
r go steady with the winner?"
"What kind of contest?" cried Manuel and Ed.
"A tree-sitting contest," cried Ursula Thing. "Natch !"
"Done and done," cried Manuel and Ed, and they clambered
up adjoining aspens, taking with them the following necessaries:
food, water, clothing, medicaments, bedding, reading matter,
and - most essential of all - plenty of Philip Morris cigarettes.
We who live on the ground, with all the attendant advan-
tages, know how important Philip Morris cigarettes are. Think,
then, how much more important they must be to the lonely tree
dweller - how much more welcome their vintage tobaccos, how
much more soothing their mild pure flavor, how much more
comforting to know as one sits in leafy solitude that come wind
or weather, come light or dark, Philip Morris will always remain
the same dependable, reliable, flavorful friend.
Well supplied with Philip Morris, our heroes began their contest
- Manuel with good heart, Ed with evil cunning. The shocking
fact is that Ed intended to win the contest with a Machiavellian
ruse. It seems that Ed, quite unbeknownst to Manuel, was one
of three identical triplets. Each night while Manuel dozed on
his bough, one of Ed's brothers - Fred or Jed - would sneak
up the tree and replace him. Thus Ed was spending only one-third
as much time in the tree as Manuel. "How can I lose?" said Ed
with a crafty giggle to his brother Fred or Jed.
But Ed had a surprise coming. For Manuel, though he did not
know it himself, was a druid! He had been abandoned as an
infant at the hut of a poor and humble woodcutter named
Winthrop Mayhew Sigafoos, who had raised the child as his own.
So when Manuel got into the tree, he found to his surprise that
he'd never felt so at home and happy in his life, and he had
absolutely no intention of ever leaving.
After four or five years Ed and his brothers wearied of the
contest and conceded. Ursula Thing came to Manuel's tree and

i

...............

a

Jz /{ J
C'2 L f M A - - -
,, ,~* .1"{

YOU'VE7
Probably wondered
what the
Student Co-ops
are all about...
At Michigan there are three men's, three women's, and one married couples' cooperatives
which house about two hundred students. Here are a few facts on how the co-ops work.
WHO OWNS AND RUNS THE CO-OPS? WE DO.
Co-ops are owned by the Inter-Cooperative Council (I.C.C.), a corporation set up
and run entirely by the students who live or eat in the houses. Each member, new or old,
has one vote, and shares equally in all decisions: what to eat, how much to spend, how
much to work.
WHO MAY JOIN THE CO-OPS? ANYBODY.
Andbody who agrees to participate in running the co-ops democratically is welcome.
Members are accepted on a first come first served basis without racial, social, religious
or political discrimination. There is no pledge or initiation period.
WHAT ARE THE LIVING AND EATING ARRANGEMENTS?
As a roomer, you are provided with a bed, closet space, desk, chairs, shelves, storage
space as well as the social space and eating privileges. "
As a boarder, you get twenty meals a week, planned and prepared by you and your
fellow co-opers.
"Guffing", our traditional between-meal snacking, is one of our most cherished
privileges. Everyone has free access at all times to milk, bread, butter and jam, fresh
fruit, cereal and leftovers. Eggs and some other items are charged at cost.
Any member may invite guests. There are adequate laundry facilities. Co-ops stay
open during vacation periods and in the summer.
HOW MUCH DOES IT COST?
Each house sets its own budget. Average costs for the past semester have been:
approx. per week approx. per semester
For room and board $13.00 $208
For board only $ 8.25 $130
New members pay a $20 deposit when they join; it is refunded when they leave. There
are no other dues of any kind.
WHO DOES THE WORK? WE DO.
All the cooking, dishwashing, maintenance and management is done by the members;
each choosing the job he or she feels best fitted for. Any member, new or old, can be
elected officer: president, house manager, food purchaser, bookkeeper . .
It takes from four to five hours a week per member to run a co-op. The exact work
time is decided by vote of the house.
There are no maids, janitors, resident advisors or other paid employees,
HOW ABOUT THE LIGHTER SIDE OF LIFE?
Co-ops aren't merely an inexpensive way to live. The men's, women's and couples'
houses have together a aood number of orannized social events. Our members. comina

F
N
I
and

C

I

S
H
I
R
T

L
A
U
N
D
R
Y

H AVE the most beaut
most beautiful day in your
in our hearts for brides so that'
and expense to find the ne
and at a price that wi
BEAUTIFUL LACES
Advertised in1
You'll now find in
Priced from
Bridal Veils,I

tiful dress in the world for thaat
r life. We have a soft place
s why we went to so much trouble
newest and loveliest bridal gowns
ill fit that already stretched budget.

S - TULLEST SATINS

I

SERVICE
Phone
NO 2-3231
Day or Night

leading magazines
our Bridal Department
39.95 to 100.00
too, from 10.95

I

m

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan