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February 09, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-09

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PAGE RfX

i'A E lVllCj l+tUAA DA ire I

WhONE6DAY, VEBRUARY 9, 1955

; A, . E3A e I74

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Industrial Aid to Education
Increased by New GM Plan

ESPERANTO:
Artificial Language Usage
Impractical, Hootkins Says

Current trends for industrial aid
to education were strengthened on
Jan. 18 by announcement of a
General Motors Corporation plan
for assistance to the nation's col-
leges and universities.
Although the three-part pro-
gram has not yet gone into full
effect, local authorities have pre-
dicted it will benefit the University.
GM President Harlowe H. Cur-
tice explained the program in an
address last month in New York.
It is designed, he said, to fill "two
paramourt needs of these institu-

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Read and Use Daily Classifieds

O M
VALENTINES IN TOWN
also the most sentimental
CHESTER ROBERTS
O 312 South State Street
- i ) - -,. -moy o ) t ~ to -c--_-- --t--0 - > c<--: (= x - r -o o - r_<>r-> o
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tions: unrestricted funds to be
used in maintaining and improving
the quality of education" and "fi-
nancial aid to young people of out-
standing talents but limited re-
sources."
Includes Several Plans
Plans for colleges, secondary
school graduates and foundations
are included in the program.
Through the college plan, Cur-
tice said, institutions with many
GM-employed alumni will be se-
lected to award 250 four-year
scholarships. The national plan
will award 100 four-year scholar-
ships annually to outstanding high
school graduates throughout the
country.
Explaining the foundation plan,
Curtice announced that founda-
tions representing colleges in sev-
eral states, including Michigan,
will receive unrestricted grants of
$10,000 each. When the program
reaches full operational stages in
its fourth year, he added, a total
of 306 colleges and universities will
benefit from this support.
Talk Slated on
North African
Architecture
North African architecture will
be discussed by G. E. Kidder
Smith, lecturer at Rennsalear
Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y.,
at 3:30 p.m. tomorrow, Architec-
ture Auditorium.
A member of the American In-
stitute of Architecture, Smith is
also an author and a photograph-
er. He has written architectural
studies, accompanied by photo-
graphs, on Brazil, Sweden and
Italy. The lecture will be illus-
trated with photographs.

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
FACULTY WOODWIND QUINTET WILL PLAY AT
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATER TONIGHT
Music Faculty To Present
Wood wind. Piano Concert

k2
In the second School of Music
faculty concert this week, the
woodwind quintet will give a con-
cert at 8:30 p.m. today in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater.
IComposed of faculty members,.
Nelson Hauenstein, flute; Albert
Luconi, clarinet; Florian Mueller,
oboe; Clyde Carpenter, French
horn; and Lewis Cooper, bassoon,
the first half of the concert will
consist of the Suite No. 2, op. 22,
by Berezowsky; Deux Pieces, by
Ropartz; Three Shanties, by Ar-
nold; and Variations sur un theme
corse, by Tomasi.
Prof. Owen To Play
Featured in the second half of
the program will be Prof. Marion
Owen of the piano department whc
will play Divertissement Op. 6, by
Roussel, and the Mozart Quintet,
K. 452 with the quintet.
- - - - -

Prof. Owen studied in Austria
with Josef and Rosina Lhevinne,
and in New York under a Julliard
Graduate School fellowship with
the Lhevinnes, Felix Salinond, Ol-
ga Samaroff-Stokowski and others.
A soloist with the Havana Phil-
harmonic Orchestra, Prof. Owen
has given concerts in the South
and in New York City.
In 1945, she came to Ann Arbor
to coach with Joseph Brinkman
and the following year joined the
faculty.
In Ann Arbor she has made ap-
pearances in solo recitals, with
chamber music groups and was the
soloist with the University Sym-
phony Orchestra in the Chopin
Centennial Memorial Concert.
The concert is open to the public
without charge.

LOOKING FOR A DARKROOM

TO USE?

By SHIRLEY CROOG
"Esperanto should never become
a spoken language," Prof. Hirsch
Hootkins of the romance languages
department and Graduate School
said recently.
Esperanto, an artificial language
devised for international use,
raises the question of the practi-
cality and value of a universal
tongue.
According to Prof. Hootkins, Es-
peranto represents "a written me-
dium of communication rather
than a spoken one. It would be
useful as a written language be-
tweenediplomats, educators, and
business men."
Many Dialects
Linguists maintain if Esperanto
became a spoken tongue, it would
have as many dialects as there are
today.
"Esperanto will never replace
national language," Prof. Hootkins
added. "Furthermore, it should not
be forced on national prides."
Lazarus L. Zamenhof, the Rus-
sian oculist and linguist who "cre-
ated" Esperanto in 1887 provided
the fundamental vocabulary with
roots of Latin and Greek words. It
is essentially a romance language
with Slavic and Germanic words.
Esperanto has no grammar ex-
ceptions.Verbs aregconjugated
alike. The tonic accent is always
on the last syllable. Words may
be placed in any convenient order.
Pronunciation is simple. Each
word has a definite meaning.
There are no word homonyms.
Learning Is Easy
Esperanto is easy to learn, ac-
cording to Prof. Hootkins. "It
may take a person without any
language background except Eng-
lish as little as three months to
learn," he said.
Prof. Ihor Sevcenko of the Slav-
ic Languages department com-
mented that a successful language
must be "useful socially,"
"Artificial language does not
meet this requirement," he said.
As far as 'international lan-
guages are concerned, Prof. Sev-
cenko continued, "the language is
usually that of the 'top dog' cul-
turally or politically."
Regional Languages
"Historically," Prof. Sevcenko
added, "there have been many 're-
gional' international languages.
Conquering nations have imposed
their language or have adopted
the tongue of the conquered na-
tion, when the latter was on a
culturally higher plain.
During the 1930's Russia soft
pedaled the idea of Esperanto as a
possible international language,
because it was not interested in
communication between Soviet
and Western workers. Now, Russia
wants Russian to become the in-
ternational language.
At the present time, Prof. Sev-
cenko added, Russian is being
taught in Poland, Hungary, and
Czechoslovakia.
Society Must Show Need
"In order for an international
language to be accepted society
must first present a need for it,"
Prof. Sevcenko said. "Secondly,
there must be a group strong
enough to impose this language
the world over. At the present time
no such group exists."
Prof. Sevcenko said he feels that
there is a real chance of limited
application of an artificial lan-
guage in scientific communication.
"Nationalistic attitudes today
make the idea of an international

r

1 N

Help take pictures SNOW for the 1955
'Ensian with 'Ensian equipment, and our
new complete darkroom is at your dis-
posal. For more information contact
Paul Kerastas, Photography Editor, to-

Wanyt to tra vel
abroad?
Take a university-sponsoed
tour via TWA this summer
and earn full college credit
while you travel
V"s-t the countries of your
choice ... study from 2 to 6
weeks at a foreign university.
You can do both on one trip
when you arrange a university-
sponsored tour via TWA. Itini-
eraries include countries in
Europe, the Middle East, Asia
and Africa. Special study tours
available. Low all-inclusive
prices with TWA's economcal
Sky Tourist service.
For information, write: John
11. Furbay, Ph. D., Director,
Air World Tours, Dept. CN,
380 Madison Ave. New YXork
17, N. Y Be sure to mention
countries you xwh to visit.
zIWA
tRANS WORLD AIRLIES

Your placement office has
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detailing starting positions
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You may sign up flow for
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language less acceptable," Prof.
Philip Taylor of the political sci-
ence department said. He -added
that the United Nations would be
reluctant to accept Esperanto be-
cause it would involve the added
cost of hiring translators and is-
suing publications in Esperanto.
Prof. Lawrence Kiddle of the
Romance Language department
remarked that "international lan-
guage is so much against national-
ism. It runs counter to present day
ideas of national character.
People Prefer Native Language
"At international meetings,"
Prof. Kiddle continued, "people
like to use their own language be-
cause they feel they can express
themselves better in the subtleties
of language.
"What we need are more bi-
linguists, rather than international
language speaking people," Prof.
Kiddle said.
During the 1940's Prof. Kiddle
noted that he received an interna-
tional newsletter from Mexico,
published in Esperanto. It was
easy to read. It stressed, however,
the importance of Esperanto and
international good will. Then it
disappeared.
Esperanto is only one example
of an artificial language. Ido, Vo-
lapuk, Idiom Neutral and Inter-
Lingua are other "synthetic" lan-
guages.
Esperanto is not taught at the
University.
'No Demand For Esperanto
"There is no demand for such a
course," Prof. Hootkins said. He
added "anything of this interna-
tional nature nowadays is 'sus-
pect.'''
Prof. Hootkins taught Esperan-
to to interested groups in Ann Ar-
bor during the 1930's.
Until a few years ago Esperanto
was used on the Iowa Placement
Examination to test foreign lan-
guage aptitude of freshman stu-
dents entering the University.
This examination, however, was
recently eliminated from the test-
ing program, according to Prof.
Edward Furst of the Bureau of
Psychological Services.
Army Seeks
Women for
WAC Training
Department of the Army is
seeking outstanding women col-
lege graduates for commissioning
in the Women's Army Corps, Army
Reserve.
Applicants for WAC training
must be United States citizens be-
tween 21 and 27 years of age, pos-
sess a baccalaureate degree prior
to appointment as a commissioned
officer, have no dependents under
18 and be of a high moral oharac-
I ter.
Qualified applicants will be com-
missioned on graduation and serve
their initial duty at the WAC
School, Fort Lee, Va. They must
agree to serve two years on active
duty.
Inthe near future a WAC offi-
cer will be on campus to interview
interested women and receive ap-
plications. Col. C. W. Land is avail-
able to answer questions on the
program and may be reached by
calling University extension 720.
Mildred Webber of the Bureau of
Appointments and Occupational
Information, extension 371, may
also be contacted for further in-
formation.
Bordin To Head
MPA Next Year

Prof. Edward S. Bordin of the
psychology department will head
the Michigan Psychological Asso-
ciation next year.
This marks the second time
within three years that a Univer-
sity faculty member has presided
over the group. Prof. Wilbert J.
McKeachie of the psychology de-
partment held the position during
1954.
Current MPA president is Prof.
Donald M. Johnson of Michigan
State College.
SUMMER TOUR
By plane New York-London-
New York. 49-day trip from
June 29 to August 16. Eng-
land, France, Monaco, Italy,
Yugoslavia, Austria, Germany,
Switzerland, Holland. Conduct-
ed by Dr. E. Bourbousson, as-
soc. prof. modern languages at

day! South Quad NO 3-0521, Ext.

757.

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