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March 17, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGI NIX

'THE MCMGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 19Sl1

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 19~R

Yalta Papers
Reveal Big 3
Agreements
(Continued from Page One)
At another point President
Roosevelt expressed the hope the
British woul dturn their great port
of Hong Kong over to China-a
hope that never materialized.
A spokesman for the British
Foreign Office indicated yester-
day in London that the Churchill
government still feels publication
of the secret documents is unde-
sirable at this time.
Considered Inadvisable
The Foreign Office said in a
statement last week that is con-
sidered publication inadvisable
now, while some of the conference
participants are still alive.
Churchill is the only surviving
member of the Big Three who met
at the Russian Crimean resort of
Yalta in 1945.
He, Stalin and President Roose-
velt and their aides met then to
discuss the fate of Germany, the
future of Eastern Europe, the for-
mation of the United Nations and
the general progress of World
War Ii
There was no official explana-
tion as to why Secretary of State
Dulles had decided to let the docu-
ments become public.
However, it was understood the
decision was made after the State
Department heard that a news-
paper had ovtained a copy of the
record and planned to publish it
today.
Conference Held in 1945
The Yalta conference took place
in February 1945 with Russia
agreeing to going to war against
Japan within two or three months
after the subjugation of Germany,
which came May 7, 1945.
Russia entered the war against
Japan on Aug. 9, 1945,. three days
after the atomic bomb was drop-
ped on Hiroshima. Japan surrend-
bred on Aug. 14.
The Yalta papers said that
Roosevelt, in expressing hope
Britain would give the sovereignty
of Hong Kong back to China, add-
ed that the city should then be-
come an internationalized port.
FOLLETTS FOR BROWSING
INEXPENSIVE
REPRINTS
---A feature at FOLLETT
Penguin Pocket Bantam
Signet Dell Vintage
Image Anchor . Merridian
Modern Library and Rinehardt
Books - ALL BARGAINS
BUY and SAVE at
FOLLETT'S
State St. ot N. University

PROF. STIRTON EXAMINES AUSTRALIAN FOSSIL
Paleontology Professor
Studies Fossil Records

By ETHEL KOVITZ
"It's just like a Yankee to try
to do what can't be done."
That's what people from var-
ious parts of the world said of
Prof. I. A. Stirton, of the Univer-
sity of California when he left for
Australia to search for that con-
tinent's lost fossil history.
After spending the summers of
1953 and 1954 in Australia, Prof.
Stirton did uncover some of this
record. "A great measure of our
C.D to Hold
Demonstration
A full-scale demonstration of the
world's loudest air raid siren will
be conducted by the Washtenaw
County Office of Civil Defense 9
to 9:30 a.m. tomorrow in Ann Ar-
bor and Ypsilanti.
The siren will be mounted on a
truck and moved to several loca-
tions in both cities to find a place
in both cities where the coverage
is greatest.
Citizens are reminded that this
will simply be a demonstration,
and are urged to continue with
their regular occupations. It will
not be an air raid warning.
'Technic on Sale
Michigan Technic, magazine for
engineering students, will be on
sale today and tomorrow at the
Engine Arch.

success would have been impos-
sible, however, without the aid of
the Australians," he said.
Observed Strange Mammals
Prof. Stirton recognized the ne-
cessity of knowing living animals
before studying the past. He ob-
served strange primitive mammals
found only in Australia, such as
animals having' a great many rep-
tilian features. The duck-billed
platypus, which is an egg-laying
mammal, and the kangaroo are
examples of exclusively Australian
animals.
Aside from the trip to Australia,
Prof. Stirton has gone on expedi-
tions to El Salvador, Colombia,
and throughout North America.
Exhibits and Movies
He has also supervised the back-
ground painting and modeling of
animals for exhibits used on the
Treasure Island Exposition in 1939
and for a movie recently released
by the University of California
Extension Division.
In the past few years Prof. Stir-
ton has taken time off from his
job of chairman of the paleon-
tology department and director of
the museum at the University of
California in order to lecture in
India, Spain, France, England and
other countries.
A lecture clarified by slides will
be presented by Prof. Stirton at
4:10 p.m. today in the Natural
Science Auditorium. Entitled "Liv-
ing Australian Mammals," it is
sponsored by the University geol-
ogy department and is open to the
public.4

Republicans,
Democrats
Plan Debates
Ann Arbor Republican and Dem-
ocratic Party organizations are
planning a radio debate series of
programs to present their candi-
dates to the voters, before the
April 4 election, over WPAG-TV
at 10 p.m.
A main part of the election
campaign of both parties, the radio
series will feature discussions on
issues of local interest between
candidates for ward supervisor,.
aldermen, Council president and
Mayor.
Prof. Samuel Estep will moder-
ate the debate between candi-
dates for supervisor from the fifth,
sixth and seventh wards in a half-
hour program today.
Between March 21 and March
30, candidates for Aldermen in
the City Council will debate is-
sues on 15-minute programs mod-
erated by University professors.
The series will end with a half-
hour program for the two candi-
dates for Council President March
31 and a half-hour program for
the two mayoral candidates Ap-
ril 1
In addition to the radio series,
Democrat and GOP war4 and pre-
cinct organizations are 'sponsor-
ing a number of informal meet-
ings at which voters may meet
local candidates and discuss elec-
tion issues and party platforms.
Republicans will also hold a
coffee hour from 4 to 6 p.m. to-
day at Party headquarters in hon-
or of Rep. Alvin Bentley, guest
speaker at the. University's birth-
day celebration.
Democrat campaign plans in-
clude an informal public gather-
ing of all Democrat candidates for
Alderman at the home of Prof.
John Weimer of the English de-
partment March 19 and a party
for all Ward 6 Democrats at the
home of Prof. William Frankena
of the philosophy department on
March 26.
Candidates for Regent, Eugene
Power and Paul L. Adams will
address members of the Ann Ar-
bor Women's Democrat Club and
their husbands March 25 at the
Women's City Club.
Posts Available
Students interested in working
on the International Week to be
held from May 9-14, may submit
their names to the International
Students Association Office in the
International Center.
The various committees include,
publicity, decorations, tickets, pag-
eant and floorshow. A master of
ceremonies is also needed.

Industry

To GetReactor

Chicago Site
For Nuclear
Research
The first nuclear reactor for in-
dustrial research will be construct-
ed this year.
The machine, which will be used
entirely for peacetime research
will be located at the Illinois In-
stitute of Technology in Chicago.
It will be available to industrial,
government or public sponsors.
Industry Benefits
For furthering research and de-
velopment, the reactor will be use-
ful in biology, chemistry, food pro-
cessing, electronics, oils and gases,
rubber, leather and plastics.
The machine will not be used
for research on electrical power
generation or reactors. There will
be no competition for military use
of the machine and no secrecy, ex-
cept to protect individual pro-
grams.
Safety Device
Since the reactor is designed to
be "self-contained," it confines all
radioactivity within the machine.
It prevents fumes, gases or smoke
from escaping.
The Atomic Energy Commission
will provide fuel for the reactor on
the "extended loan" basis, for ap-
proved designs, building plans, and
operations.
Construction, costing approxi-
mately $500,000 will begin about
March 15
Story by
SHIRLEY CROOG
Photos Courtesy Illinois
Institute of Technology

SCHEDULED FOR

'55:

CLOSEUP SKETCH of the first nuclear reactor for private industrial research. The reactor will be
built on the Illinois Institute of Technology campus, where the 50,000 watt reactor will be used to de-
velop the peacetime applications of atomic energy.

'SIAMESE DOUGHNUT
William F. Stephens
Florida State University
WORM CROSSING DEEP CRACK
IN SIDEWALK
Nancy Reed Ingham
University of Washington

wLCKY DROODLES ! GET BEM HERE!

WHAT'S THIS? For solution see paragraph below.
Droodle suggested by Norman Gerber, C. C. N. Y.

t

HAVE A LITTLE FUN when you
smoke. Enjoy yourself. Give your-
self the pleasure of a better-

S
F
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tasting Lucky Strike.

The

enthusiasm often inspired by
Luckies' famous better taste is
illustrated in the Droodle (right)
titled: Alphabet soup for Lucky
smoker. So why steW over what
cigarette {to smoke? Luckies'
taste is letter-perfect. After all,
L.S. /M.F.T.-Lucky Strike means
fine tobacco. Then, that tobacco
is toasted to taste better. "It's
Toasted"- the famous Lucky
Strike process-tones up Luckies'
light, mild, good-tasting tobacco

Robert Loftness, left, and Harry Pearlman, research scientists, discuss a model of the proposed nuclear reactor. Atomic fission, which
takes place in the reactor core, produces neutrons and radiation useful in medical, industrial, and scientific research,

F

U

V '1
- 'rl

y

IsA F
V
to make it taste even better ...
cleaner, fresher, smoother. When
you light up, enjoy the better-
tasting cigarette...Lucky Strike.

I

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-rn-I

MEETING OF CHINESE AND
AMERICAN OIL WELLS
Gary A. Steiner
University of Chicago

" !.".".Ai # # s
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STUDENTS I

125!
t Where

v tl' tom, ZII7tc: C? S : ;.
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EARN $

Lucky Droodles* are pouring in!

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