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March 13, 1955 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, MARCH 13,195;

THE MICHIGAN DAII V

PAM FIVE

SUNDA, MARH 13,1955 HE MT!flHa~T 1ATW. 3£flU WT

raua. r a rwr.

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Juniors Will Present Annual Play

Senior Coeds
First To See
Original Play
With the rise of the opening
curtain at 8 p.m. Thursday 14
song and dance numbers plus sev-
eral comedy scenes will unfold, as
the junior coeds present the 1955
Junior Girls' Play, "Cock-a-Hoop,"
before a Senior Night audience.
Set in modern type scenery, the
original show will be repeated be-
fore an all-campus audience Fri-
day and Saturday evenings from
the Lydia Mendelssohn theatre
stage.
A special showing has also been
scheduled for 2:30 p.m. Saturday,
with a backstage open house on
the agenda afterward.
This matinee was planned with
sophomore and freshmen women
in mind, to give them an oppor-
tunity to become interested in
working on their own JGP.
Ticketsh- 90 Cents
Reserved seat tickets are priced
at 90 cents per person, with soph-
omore and freshmen women ad-
mitted for 60 cents Saturday aft-
ernoon.
The ducats will be on sale from
1 to 5 p.m. tomorrow through Fri-
day and from 7 to 8 p.m. Friday
and Saturday at the Lydia Men-
delssohn box office.
Weeks of planning and rehear-
sals will culminate with the first
performance of the annual show,
which this year revolves aroundl
the "show within a show" theme.j

Hillel Show
Will Feature
Original Skits
United Jewish Appeal
To Receive Proceeds
From Annual Revue
For the benefit of the United
Jewish Appeal Drive; Hillel will
present its annual Hillelzapoppin
at 715 p.m. Saturday.
Hillelzapoppin is a long estab-
lished tradition at Michigan. Since
1945, this show has enlisted the
support of fraternity, sorority and
independent groups who vie for
the coveted gold cup given to the
group presenting the best skit.
Since 1947, when the trophy was
first presented, Sigma Delta Tau
has won it twice, Zeta Beta Tau
four times, including last year, and
independent groups have won it
twice.
Proceeds for Charity
Proceeds from Hillelzapoppin
are given to the United Jewish Ap-
peal which distributes funds to
several beneficiaries. In addition
to those organizations benefiting
from the funds of the U.J.A., Beth
Israel Congregation and Hillel
Foundation in Ann Arbor receive
part of the funds.
This year's entrants are Alpha
Epsilon Phi, Phi Sigma Delta,
Sigma Alpha Mu, Sigma Delta
Tau, Zeta Beta Tau, Michigan
State Normal Hillel Group and
the Traumatic Players consisting
of independent women.
Tickets on Sale
Tickets for the production are
$1.75 and $1.50. Prices include free
bus transportation from the
League to Tappan Junior High
School and then back to Hillel
after the performance for a post
party.
Tickets will be on sale from 11
a.m. to noon and 1 to 2 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday in Mason
Hall.
This year's Hillelzapoppin is
headed by Jerry Schreiber and
Grace Ritow. Lois Mishelowe, Bar-
bara Hecht, Mel Adelman and
Mark Gallon are in charge of the
program.

FREEDOM FROM GARTERS,
BELTS AND GIRDLES!

MOJU.D

-Daily-Sam Ching
LAST MINUTE CHECK-Modeling one of the 76 costumes created
for "Cock-a-Hoop," the 1955 JGP, Irene Kellogg, assistant cos-
tume chairman, is given a final measuring by Nancy Johnston,
committee chairman.

-Daily-Esther Goudsmit
CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN MUSIC-Rehearsing for the an-
nual Sigma Alpha Iota American Musicale tonight are Pat
Stenberg, oboist, accompanied by Linda Reck. They will play a
concerto composed by Florian Mueller, (above), instructor in the
music school.
Sigma Alpha Iota To Give
Annual American Musicale

KN EE-H1I(
STOCKING
These ultra-sheer Mojud Knee-I
Stockings will fit...won't slip..
t two reasons;
1. The lacy, elastic top he
firmly yet gently.
2. Exclusive Aagic-Motion
extra give and spring b
right in the knit means y
Moj d Knee-Highs willc
like a second skin!
You'reassured of comfort and bea
sitting, standing or walking. Comi
today for Mojud Knee-High St
ings. See how glamourous they
$125

High
.for
,olds
rack
your
cling
uty,
e in
ock.
are!

GH
%
.s

Under the direction of cos-
tumes chairman Nancy Johnston,
16 coeds have put in innumerable
hours creating 76 costumes, hats
and gloves and collecting charac-
ter ensembles,
Setting up shop in the basement
of the Alpha Delta Pi sorority
house and armed with two sewing
machines, the women have turned

Landscapers' Artistry
Keeps Nature's Beauty

out yards of ruffles and tens of
other colorful items.
Designed by the chairman, with
the aid of Irene Kellogg, assist-
ant chairman, the costumes were
first cut out of paper and then
from the 260 yards of material
used.
Basement Headquarters
Setting up their headquarters in
the League basement, members of
the scenery committee have spent
dozens of hours and pounds of
paint constructing the contem-
porary style backdrops.
"Jacks of all trades" by neces-
sity, the coeds have done every-
thing from carpentry work to
stretching canvas on flats to
painting. Surprisingly enough,
only one minor accident has re-
sulted-a smashed finger.
Although the carpentry work is
carried on in a basement room,
committee members made use of
almost all the League facilities.

Sigma Alpha Iota honorary
music sorority will hold its annual
American Musicale at 8:30 p.m.
today in Mason Hall Auditorium
A, including the first public per-
formance of "Quintet for Wood-
winds" by Elaine Friedman, a sen-
ior in music school.
The program is open to the pub-
lic at no charge, and will feature
contemporary American music.
Included in the performance will

iI#44j Ciap 2u4

i

By PAT NORTON
In thumbing through the Uni-
versity catalogue, have you ever
stumbled across a course called
landscape architecture?
It is a division of the College
of Architecture and Design offer-
ed for undergraduate students.
According to Prof. Harlow Whitte-'
more who teaches the course, this
type of architecture deals with
the out-of-doors,
This is opposed to building arch-
itecture, which deals with the con-
struction of buildings, their in-
terior and surrounding land.
Suitable Locations
"When such an architect begins
his work, he tries to find a loca-
tion which has as many natural
adaptions as possible for his pur-
pose," says Prof. Whittemore.
In the building of a ski jump
for instance, he lioks for open
space with some hills, because it
is too costly to create them.
"Students who enter landscape
architecture must have a good
background in mathematics,
science and biology, and if pos-
sible also chemistry and physics,"
Prof. Whittemore declared.
Courses are similar to those tak-

en by architects except that they
must take a special botany and
geology copse.
European History dealing with
the different methods of architec-
ture used through the years and
surveying which is the same as
that taken by the civil engineers
is also given.
Landscape architects take draw-
ing, painting and architecture
drawing and design so as to un-
derstand its construction.
"Instruction is given in three
categories," Professor Whittemore
said. The first is that of general
landscape design which includes
knowledge of plant materials.
Second is natural vegetation and
horticulture, which includes tak-
ing several long field trips.
Construction is the third cate-
gory and includes waterforms,
walks and roads.
City planning is a special cate-
gory offered.
Landscape architecture was first
referred to as Topearius, which
means shearing of trees. It start-
ed in Ancient Rome when the em-
perors and nobility wanted their
large estates decorated.

THIRD OF SEMESTER:
Informality Will Prevail.
At Hatcher's Open House

Informality will be the keynote
at the third Hatcher Open House
of the semester, as President and
Mrs. Harlan H. Hatcher open
their home to students between 4
and 6 p.m. Wednesday.
Although the tea is open to all
students on campus, special invi-
tations have been sent to Ander-
son, Greene, Hinsdale and Tyler
houses in East Quadrangle.
Members of Sigma Chi, Chi Phi,
Trigon, Phi Chi and Kappa Kappa
Gamma have also been invited in
addition to coeds living in Jordon
Hall, Helen Newberry Residence,
Victor Vaughn and Miller League
House.
Students in the School of Edu-
cation will also be honored
The entire Hatcher residence

will be open. Students are free to
visit any part of the house,
Entertainment will feature mem-
bers of this year's cast of Junior
Girls' Play, Cock-a-Hoopa
Pourers for the open house will
be Mrs. Ruth Marker, Jordon;
Mrs. Nelly Newell, Greene; Mrs.
Mildred Peck, Hinsdale; Mrs.
Frances R. Lehrer, Kappa Kappa
Gamma; Mrs. Ruth L. Merrill,
Newberry; Sara L. Rowe, Ander-
son and Mrs. Robert Cross.
League representatives in charge
of the event are Grace Rittell,
Carolyn Moeller and Jo Craft.
Union officials making arrange-
ments for the affair are Mark
Sabin, chairman of the events,
and Jim Leven.

SCROLL-There will be a Scrollj
meeting at 2 p.m. today at the
Delta Delta Delta House.
FROSH WEEKEND-Blue team
tryouts for Frosh Weekend will bek
held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. todayz
and tomorrow in the League.
HILLEL-Hillel will present its
annual Purim dance from 8 to
10:30 p.m. today.
"The King and I," is the title
of this year's stag or drag dance.
Tickets are 25c for members and
35c for non- lembers.
Paul Brodie and his band will
provide the music and refresh-
ments will be served.
SENIOR NIGHT-Senior repre-
sentatives and married women can
pick up block tickets for Senior
Night, to be held Thursday from 9
a.m. to noon and 1:30 to 5:30 p.m.
tomorrow and Tuesday
* * *
SOPH POSITIONS-All peti-
tions for sophomore positions from
freshmen women are due at 5 p.m.
tomorrow in the League Under-
graduate Office.

be Justine Votpka at the piano,
playing "Passacaglia" by Walter
Piston and "Fantasie" by Rose Lee
Finney. Linn Bevis, contralto, ac-
companied by Nancy Bartholomew
at the piano will sing "Dover
Beach" by Samuel Barber.
"Concerto for Oboe" by Flor-
ian Mueller of the School of Music
will be given by Patricia Sten-
berg at the oboe, accompanied by
Linda Reck at the piano. Miss
Votpka will play for Elizabeth
Fischer, soprano, who will sing
"Let It Be Forgotten" by Kagen,
'Misst," and "Lament" by Norman
Dello Joio.
Participating in the "Quintet for
Woodwinds" will be Sylvia Sher-
man on the English horn; Miss
Stenb erg, oboe; Eleanor Becker,
bassoon; Virginia Catanese, clari-
net and Jackie Mindlin, French
:corn.
The SAI Choir under the direct-
tion of Miss Reck with Phyllis
Stringham at the piano will give
"How Excellent Thy Name" by
Howard Hanson, "A Village Where
They Ring No Bells" by Walter
Hendl and "So Near, So Dear" by
Glad Robinson Youse.
Dressmaking,
Alterations
and Repairs
for appointment
Call .NO 3.3294

OIA
W~f.

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

JTuTio R ICT.

-

I

I

Have You Considered A

As advertised in Vogue

i

6
I
- y
An immense expanse of
creamy-rich fabric..,
Princeton's Orlon ... that
washes easily. Zim-Stra
gives it flattering
lines, masterful tailoring
and fashionable details.
The whole dramatic look"
is punctuated by one
saucer-size button.
Destined to be the most
important coat in your
wardrobe.

\1

LONG
or
SHORT

CAREER

IN

. ~~ .tm"d
kx4 '
.{
x-.0
Eas wAWW LO N G . .49 95
SHORT ..39.95

RETAILING
Retailing is a fascinating field, with
the intriguing challenge of a con-
stantly changing scene. There are
more opportunities in retailing than
there are men and women to fill them.
These positions are attractive in finan-
cial reward for the imaginative and
creative person. They offer pleasant
working conditions and rewarding
careers for college graduates.

t

'4

11

Eton Britisher 's
Flannel Blazer
This is the blazer the entire campus has pro-
claimed their favorite . . . there must be a
reason. In all wool flannel with an attractive
crest, it comes in white, charcoal, navy, and
red in sizes 10 to 18, and it's only
19.95
- 1 __C.-- IO --_ I r% s e a L s . l

Jacobson's, an 86-year-old Michigan
Fashion Institution, seeks young peo-
ple for its learn-by-doing training
program, offering salary while learn-
ing, and eventual executive positions.
Most of the important positions in
this rapidly growing business have
been filled from this training pro-
gram.
SEE MR. WILLIAM FREIDRICHS
OF OUR ANN ARBOR STORE
He will gladly arrange an appoint-
ment with our placement director,
who is now interviewing, qualified
applicants.

Striped surprise, as only talented Junior House can plan it
...in this three-part suit, with straight cardigan jacket
pearl-buttoned fore and aft, and lined with print stripes to
match the weskit-blouse. Arrow-narrow fly-front skirt and
its topping are of marvelous Cape Cod butcher linen,
Tebilized@ to keep its shape through countless washings.
Red with red-and-white, black with black-and-white.:Sizes
7 to 15.
$2495

--.._.

KASAMERE SWEATERS
The new colors are here
Long Sleeve Slipover Cardigan.
Short Sleeve Slipover.

I

m

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