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January 13, 1955 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-13

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE. FTVR

m

.Y [riuW UVU

11

Buddy Rich Featured
With Dorsey Brothers
Opening a weekend of activities,
the 1955 J-Hop, "Bali Ha," will until Tommy Dorsey invited
offer couples attending the dance, to join that outfit.
music of Tommy Dorsey and his A hitch with the Marine Cc
brother, Jimmy, from 9 p.m. to and the organization of an ag
2:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 4. gation of his own followed, a
The Dorsey orchestra, starting which Buddy again joined
point for a number of stars, in- Dorseys, in his present positio
cluding Frank Sinatra, Jo Staf- Also touring with the "Fabu
ford and Dick Haymes, will fea- Dorseys" are vocalists Bill R
ture the drum beat of Buddy Rich. mond and Lynn Roberts.
"Born in a trunk" while his par- Since launching his singing
ents were playing the old-time reer as a professional at the
Long Island vaudeville circuit, of 17, Raymond has sung v
Rich got into the act at two years. three vocal groups, has beer
x A featured player at the age of five soloist and night club maste
in the 1923 version of the "Green- ceremonies and has been voc
wich Village Follies," Rich soon with five dance orchestras.
traveled the circuit in his own Children's Show
right as a song, dance and drum-
ming act. Miss Roberts started sb
mi entsat Awhen she was two years old,
President's Advice ring on a children's hour r
Advised by Pres. Woodrow Wil- show for over nine years. A
son to concentrate on his talent playing the vaudeville cir lt
for drumming, he sat in on his her early teens, she left "the r
first jam session in Brooklyn to attend high school. T'de v.
when he was 20. Several profes- appearances, night club v rk
sional band engagements followed band tours preceded her joi
the Dorsey brothers.
The musicians, deckeq ou
Hawaiian leis, will take Lb e s
at one end of the IL tami
Building during the dancE ;.
#nstr uction Decorations in keeping with
theme will surround the b ands
To B e iven will extend, in the for L of n
) el als, along the walls. Trq& clal fi
tains, potted palms aW .d a
In response to a constant de- blue false ceiling will a c id mor
mand for young leaders, the Wom- Tickets for the dane o e are b
en's Department of Physical Edu- sold this week from 1 'to 5 p.r
cation offers a non-credit course the Administration Ir u i 1 d i
in recreational leadership during Priced at $7, they wi , admit
the second semester of every year. bearers to a number c other a
Coeds must submit applications ities, including a swi xm lming p
in order to be admitted to the informal dance and :movie.
course since the number is limited Tickets will also- 'be avai
to 60. Applications are available from 1 to 5 p.m. t morrow
in Room 15 of Barbour Gymna- Friday on the Diag p aal.
slum.-
A committee of Physical Educa- AFTER DINNER SPE
tion faculty members and major
students go over the applications
and do the necessary screening.
naam;==Toastr' nast
Between 100 and 125 applications T a t a t
are usually submitted by coeds. T o o d
Screening 10 d '~ eSt
"Instructors who have had the
students in previous courses com- By ROSA P FRLBERG
Sk ment on whether the student
would be of value in the course," nConceive i olity nurt
Marie D. Hartwig, Supervisor in in good fellow's ip, dedicate
Physical Education for Women, the cultivatici of wit and
stated. graces of a ger i leman."
The class meets from 3 to 5 p.m. o ith cups "e 4 d high, a ch
every Friday of second semester. onthlyv eet is toastmat
A student must work on a class monthly meetin g of Toastma
committee that prepares certain the oldest stu de nt organizatio
types of entertainment for every campus.
class meeting and presents pre- According t, President Ric
pared material to her own group. Morrison, th e purpose of the
"An important aspect of the ganization istX ) promote the a
course," Miss Hartwig related, "is after dinner s yeaking. "Our g
the volunteer work that is done in is not secret 4" Morrison said.
the Ann Arbor community. Work- are not regi. ;tf xred with the Un:
ing with the YWCA, Dunbar Chil- sity primari 1.- because we hav
dren's Center, the occupational object on c g apus other than
therapy department of the Uni- promotion of after-dinner sp
versity Hospital and with the Ann ing within DU r own group."
Arbor Girl Scout and Brownie
troops, gives invaluable experience. A nno unce Judg
to women taking the course." A no iieJU g
Camping Weekend I C1
Coeds must also keep up a com- n )P('?Cf LOf[
plete workbook of the activities.
and material covered during the Union o Mi cials have annou
course. Near the end of the semes- judges for 'the speech contes
ter, the class members plan a be held W d I., Feb. 16 in the U.
"ca:.ping weekend" for in, or Ballroom.
around, Ann Arbor. Outdoor and Judging t ilks will be Prof. F]
indoor games and activities, with Grace, of t ie Political Science
"cooking out" highlighting the partment, ;Prof. William Sat
day, are planned. of the s i 2ech department,
At the culmination of the course, Prof. Ge o 'ge Bowman, of
a certificate is presented to each speech de p trtment of Wayne 1
coed, stating that she is recog- versity.
nized as an experienced recrea- Jack Vi s , chairman of the c
tional leader. "Because of the vol- ptitior, W s announced that

unteer work completed in Ann Ar- able merit, awards will be awar
bor," Miss Hartwig mentioned, to winnirag speakers.
"class members also get recom- Entrar . may obtain e
mendations for camp counseling forms aiL t he Unioi Student
and similar job opportunities and, fices. De ad line for returning t
if possible, are placed in desirable has bee a set for Friday, Feb.
! jobs. the end, a f the first week of cla

~xamBreak
*To Be Held
tFor Women
hirae Recreational Facilit
oros Provided for Studen
gre f- For Last Two Weeks
tU i Coeds who want to take a "t
n. from exams" will find recreat
.lom ; facilities available during the
av - weeks of finals.
There will be bowling from
- 6 p.m. Monday through Wec
J eday at the Women's Ath
a4 h Building and ice-skating frc
i .h to 10 p.m. Monday through
r of urday and 3 to 5 p.m. Sunda
T is the Coliseum.
A ist thBarbour Gym will be openJ
3 to 5 p.m. Monday through
dna until Thursda~v An 27.

I
41

University Coeds' Engagements Announced by Parents

ies
ts
break
Aonal
two
4 to
[nes-
hletic
om 8
Sat-
ay at
from
Fri-
for

CAROLYN STINEBOWER
STINEBOWER-KAUFFMAN

CAROL ELLIS

CLAUDETTE HAWES

ELIZABETH EVANS

LENORE GILDEMEISTER

O

sing
star-
radio
After
it in
oad"
ision
and
ning
t in
tand
nural
the
and
mur-
oun-
deep
e.
being
m. in
ng.
t the
ctiv-
arty,
lable
and

Uay Ul*U1U1 buay,vall . 4 1, l.JX
badminton, basket shooting and
trampoline.
S' udents are asked to call and
reserve a bowling alley, a bad-
minton court, space on the tram-
poline or a casket by noon of the
day they intend to work out, ac-
cording to Dr. Margaret Bell of
the Women's Physical Education
Department. Students may call
3-1511, extension 391, to reserve
activities.
Tl e Intra-Mural Building will
not be open between semesters.
Coeds can "cool-off" at the pool
Monday through Friday until
Thursday, Jan. 27, from 4 to 6 p.m.
and 7:15 to 9:15 p.m. On Satur-
day, Jan. 22, the pool will be
available from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
There will be co-rec swimming
hours from 7:15 to 9:15 p.m. Wed-
nesday and Saturday and from 3
to 5 p.m. Sunday.
Fridays from 7:15 to 9:15 p.m.
will continue to be faculty family
nights, and Sundays, Michigan
Night for student, faculty and ad-
ministration families, between se-
mesters.

Recently the engagement of
Carolyn Stinebower to Erle Galen
Kauffman, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Erle B. Kauffman of Washington,
D.C., was announced by her par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Leroy D. Stine-
bower of London, England.
Miss Stinebower is a sophomore'
in literary school. She is treasurer
of Jordan Hall.
Mr. Kauffman is a senior in
literary college, majoring in geolo-
gy. He is a member of Sigma Gam-
ma Epsilon, national geology pro-
fessional fraternity, and Quad-
rants, independent honorary or-
ganization.

ELLIS-KNOCK
At a dinner at the Delta Delta
Delta house recently, the engage-
ment of Carol Ellis to Midshipman
Richard Knock, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Franklin Knock of Detroit,
was announced by her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. H. L. Ellis of Oak Park.
Miss Ellis is a sophomore at the
University. She is a member of
Delta Delta Delta sorority, League
exhibition class and the Senior
Radio Guild.
Mr. Knock is a senior attending
the U.S. Naval Academy at Annap-
olis.
The wedding will be September
3.

HAWES-HENNESSEY
The engagement of Claudette
Virginia Hawes to Lt. Richard
Gerald Hennessey of the Air Force
was announced by Miss Hawes'
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter H.
Hawes of Bay Ridge, Md., at a
holiday cocktail party.
A senior in the literary college,
Miss Hawes is a chemistry major
and president of her sorority, Al-
pha Omicron Pi.
Lt. Hennessey, of Silver Springs,
Md., attended Pennsylvania State
College prior to his entrance into
the Air Force, and was affiliated
with Dglta Upsilon fraternity. He
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Willis
L. Gise, and is currently stationed

in England with the 91st Fighter
Bomber Squadron.
Wedding plans have been set
for June 18, in Annapolis, Md.
EVANS-WAIT
The engagement of Elizabeth
Evans to William V. Wait, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Edgar F. Wait of
Birmingham, was announced by
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
M. Evans of Detroit.
Miss Evans is a senior in the lit-
erary college.
Mr. Wait is a senior in the
School of Business Administration.
A late summer wedding is plan-
ned.

GILDEMEISTER-DEAN

Mr. and Mrs. Leo F. Gildemeister
of Farmington announce the en-
gagement of their daughter, Len-
ore, to Robert G. Dean, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Bernard McCraw of Bay
City.
Miss Gildemeister is a freshman
in the literary college, majoring in
Spanish.
Mr. Dean graduated from the
literary college in 1949. He was af-
filiated with Sigma Delta Chi fra-
ternity.
They will be married in June at
Farmington.

1

AKERS:
ers Claim Title
Campus Group

1"

-4
\ ~ \

e

0

Lured
.d to
the
horus
Lt the
sters,
n on
hard
or-
rt of
roup
"We
iver-
e no
the
eak-
,es
est
nrced
st to
nion
'rank
de-
tler,
and
the
Uni-
om-
suit-
rded
ntry
Of-
hese
. 11,
asses

Candidates for membership must
be recommended by current mem-
bers. No interviews are held. Each
is voted upon : fter careful con-
sideration by the whole group.
Members a r e undergraduates,
graduates, and faculty members.
For each meeting, a previously
a p p o i n t e d toastmaster takes
charge of the after dinner speech-
es. He chooses a subject for the
evening's discussicn and selects
two speakers to deliver 10 minute
t'lks on one side of an issue.
The president selects a person
at the meeting to criticize the
toastmaster and two speakers, and
offer hclpful suggestions that will
improve their speaking ability.
Fun and Seriousness
"Although there is considerable
joking and light talk, the subjects
discussed are quite serious," Mor-
rison commented.
Money needed to run the organi-
zation is provided by the members.
Each must pay his share of the
monthly dinner and semester dues.
While active each member has a
cup, on which his name is inscrib-
ed. The cup is handed down from
out-going to incoming members.
Started about 1896, Toastmas-
ters "went along very well up to
the first World War," T. Hawley
Tapping, general secretary of the
Alumni Association and an alumni
Toastmasters member remarked.
Long History
It was out of existence for sev-
eral years following the war. "I
valued it so highly, that I brought,
it together again in 1933," Tapping
said. "We had quite a distinguished
group," he recalls, which included
Governor G. Mennen Williams,
then a law student at the Univer-
sity.
"Toastmasters is in no way af-
filiated with the national Toast-
masters Organization," Morrison
explained. "We are merely an un-
official, very informal, self-perpet-
uating group here on campus."

4>7
f N,
f ^
g*iJY mss.
r 4}* 4& ".',Y*-."
7 L } " -,' 9 {x.52 -"*, + z , y ,
4-'
r f~4 .'_ - *(~

r' :
4000

R 99
WORTH 14.95 to 16.95

V1 .

magni
couldb
wool, woo
wool

u'll be amazed that such
masterfully tailored,
ificent fabric skirts
be priced so low! All
I and cashmere blends,
and camel's hair blends

S' 1
. t~
":,
L-?? 1~

Co-Rec Night ,
The weekly co-recreational
night will not be held tomor-
row night. The activity, held at
the Intramural Building, will
resume Friday, Feb. 11.

next s' r ester.
Talks may cover any topic and
may ra ge from 1000 to 1200
words i a lengtn. A typewritten
manusci 'iat of the exact speech
should 'b l submitted immediately
precedi, t- the preliminary contest
on Mor ,day, Feb. 14 in the Ball-
room.

ri

.. . flannels, tweeds, failles,
tartan plaids ... in
flared, blade-slender
or lined back-
buttoned wrap
styles. Blue, grey,
beige, coral, red,
brown, green, yellow,
navy, pink,
lime or nude.
Junior sizes 7 to 15.
Misses sizes 10 to 18.

Your Disco atinued Textbooks
are Wor real money.
If sold to-Utrich's WITH your currently good ones.
YOUR BEST TOEAL-FIGURE IT OUT
Ulrich's sell your discontinued books to over

1!

I

600 college book.

stores. This way we get the

I

,

'° 1

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