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January 13, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-13

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY 13,:1955

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1955

Swimmers fce
Paddleball Game Originated Here;
Now Spread Completely Over Nation)

.P o isin °

Year

Records Fall in IowaWin
Sophomores PerformWe

By JIM BAAD
How many people who play pad-
deball know that the sport was
invented at the Intramural Build-
ing?
Director of intramural sports,
Eary Riskey, inventor of paddle-
ball and president of the National
Paddleball Association, says the
game "just happened."
From Paddle Tennis
It was actually derived from a
game called paddle tennis which
is played with paddles and a net.
Mr. Riskey enjoyed playing pad-
dle tennis and was also proficient
at handball. He decided to mix the
two games and paddleball was
born. The game uses handball
rules, but the ball is hit with a
paddle instead of the palm.
Insthe transition from paddle
tennis to Paddleball, the paddles
were made heavier and a more
resilient ball was introduced. The
official paddleball is actually a

tennis ball with the cover re-
moved. The paddle has a thong
attached which goes around the
wrist, eliminating the possibility
'BalletHigh'
LONDON (I)-When Walt
Davis of Texas A&M said he'd
spent six months studying es-
sentials of ballet dancing be-'
fore setting a world high jump
record, he started something.
Arthur Gold and Ron Mur-
ry, British track coaches, sug-
gested high jumpers should
study movements of ballet
dancers to gain more height. .
of the paddle flying out of the
hand.
Paddleball started at Michigan
in 1930 and began to spread out
slowly. During the war, the game
really caught on. "The reason for

this," says Riskey, "is that the
servicemen-who took part in our
intramural program hated to play
handball, so we switched to pad-
dleball. They liked the game so
much they spread it wherever they
went. Now it is played all over the
U.S."
Fairly Simple To Play
Riskey thinks the reason for the
game's popularity lies in the fact
that paddleball is simple enough
so that two men who have never
seen the game can step in and
have a lot of fun and exercise
playing it.
Other games like handball and
tennis take some skill before they
become fun to play.
The first campus paddleball
tournament was played in 1930
and has now become a regular I-M
event. Fraternities and residence
halls compete in a team elimina-
tion tourney every year. A team
consists of two singles men and a
doubles combination.
All-Campus Tournament
There is also an all-campus
elimination tournament, both sin-
gles and doubles, for individual
participants. Winners become the

HARRISON WEHNER
... promising sophomore

all-campus paddleball champs.
"Although paddleball uses hand-
ball rules," says Riskey, "it's real-
ly more like squash than anything
else."'
To prove his point he tells of a
Detroit Athletic Club squash team
who came up to play Michigan
and were beaten. After the squash
match, however, a paddleball game
was played for fun. "Although the
DAC men had never played pad-
dleball, their squash experience
paid off and they beat us," said
paddleball's inventor.

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. .Y 11

SALE!
Sport Coats
and Slacks
20% off'
Yes, our entire stock of fine all
wool sport coats and slacks is
included in this great sale.
Select the coat and slacks of
your choice and then deduct
20% from the regular price
ticket. That is your saving?
Trouser Cuffed Free - Other
Alterations at Cost.
ALL SALES FINAL

7~

;c :;
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''

By DON LINDMAN
Michigan's swimming team is in
f; or a banner season, if Monday's
'-An over Iowa State is any indi-
c ation of the strength of the Wol-
t arine natators.
In winning, 60-24, the Maize
a> id Blue men bested a vtell-bal-
at c:ed Cyclone squad which prob-
ati'Y will rank next to Ohio State
as tihe top dual meet opponent of
the 1955 season.
,yen meet marks, two pool rec-
ords, and one national standard
fell b afore the Michigan onslaught,
as se xteral Wolverine tankers dis-
player I mid-season form in rout-
ing C o'ch Jack McGuire's prote-
ges.
OM Event-Three Records
One <Of the highlights of the aft-
ernoon: was the setting of a new
nations T, pool and meet record in
the 150 -yard individual medley by
Captaf 1 -YBumpy Jones. He swam
'his' evei at in 1:28.7.
In ant )ther excellent perform-
ance, Jt Lck Wardrop's time of
2:05.4 in the 220-yard freestyle
was only four-tenths of a second
short of h is'Michigan varsity rec-
ord, set d, uring his title-winning
effort in t1 e 1954 NCAA meet.
Sophomo re Jim Thurlow blos-
somed out as a potential Wolver-
ine star wht 'n he captured the 220-
yard orthot t oxabreaststroke, con-
quering Iow: a, State's Bob Best and
Mike LaMai r two of the nation's
better breasts s 1rokers. Using an ex-
tremely fast stroke, Best pulled
away from ti -e Wolverine winner
at the start, 1 1ut Thurlow increas-
ed his own sti .ke to take the lead
from Best aq ,6 outlasted him to
the finish in. the time of 2:33.2.
'M' Wea k in Sprints
As was suspe cted at the begin-
ning of the se a,5on, Michigan is
extremely weak in the sprints. Un-
less the Wardro p twins are taken
from some othc't- rrice and used in
the sprints, it at 1Xpears that Mich-
igan will have to rely on only
Ron Gora to hanC tle the short-dis-
tance freestyle ch ores. Gora swam
a creditable, thou; :_h unspectacular
:51.6 in the 100 t4 barely edge the
Cyclones' Jim Mc Revitt, who put
on a finishing .sprint, almost
catching the forn i er middle-dis-
tance star.
John O'Rielly, s ,mother former
distance man, turn fd in a time of

:52.9 for the 100 but was edged by
Sandy Stewart for third place.
O'Rielly may be able to help solve
some of Coach Gus Stager's sprint
worries if his time improves dur-
ing the season.
Several. Wolverine sophomores
showed promise of adding depth
to the Maize and Blue squad on
the basis of their performances
last Monday. Harrison Wehner,
Marks Fall
Russia has claimed a world
record for the 400-meter in-
dividual medley swim event,
bettering a mark established
last summer by Michigan Cap-
tain "Bump" Jones.
Private V. Struzhakov of the
Russian Army was reported to
have been timed in 5:15.4.
Jones' time was 5:29.0.
A second Michigan star's
mark had also fallen.
Rich Hanley, an Evanston,
Ill., High School senior, erased
a five-year swimming record
held by Ron Gora, now a star
sprinter at Michigan, when he
swam the 10(-yard freestyle in
:51.2 in a dual meet at Oak
Park, Ill.
The time bettered Gora's na-
tional interscholastic mark of
:51.5 set in 1950 when the Wol-
verine ace was swimming for
Lane Tech, of Chicago.
Hanley is also a member of
the national record-holding
freestyle relay and medley re-
lay teams.
one of the hardest working pro-
teges of Stager, turned in a time
of 2:17 for the 220-yard freestyle,
finishing third. Fritz Myers,. a
promising individual medley pros-
pect, finished second to Jones
with a 1:33.3 performance and
should improve as the season pro-
gresses.
Boxer Awarded
NEW YORK (-P)-Carl (Bobo)
Olson, world middleweight cham-
pion, will receive the Edward J.
Neil plaque as "fighter of the
year" for 1954 Thursday night at
the 29th dinner of the Boxing
Writers Assn.

4.

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