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January 13, 1955 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-13

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, SANITARY 13, 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGFZ THTU~W

J aa. Vli i iili4iJ"A:S

l

Army Plans
To Place All
ROTCMen
All qualified Army ROTC grad-
uates will be commissioned, an-
nounced the Department of the
Army in a new plan for calling to
active duty ROTC graduates to be
commissioned between May 1 and
Sept. 30 of this year.
Entry of the commissioned offi-
cers into active duty will be phas-
ed so that approximately 6,800
7 will be called between July 1, 1955,
and June 30, 1956, and approxi-
mately 7,900 between July 1, 1956,
and June 30, 1957.
Meet Requirements
As far as branch authorizations
and limitations on total officer
procurement permit, branch re-
quirement must be met during the
next two government fiscal years,
It is possible that all graduates
of a particular branch may be re-
quired to enter active duty in the
first year because of high require-
ments for that branch. This would
apply to General Military Science
graduates allocated to that branch
as well as to branch material gra-
duates.
Each officer will attend his
branch basic course as his first
duty station. Accordingly, active
duty quotas will be' established
throughout the two year periodto
coincide with the capacity of the
service sclools to absorb these of-
ficers.
Quotas Still Met
Within quotas to be announced,
graduates may volunteer for month
of entry into active duty. Month-
ly branch quotas must be met,
however. This will mean, in gen-
eral, that approximately one-
twelfth of the officers to be called
to active duty during a year will
enter the service each month.
Merit of the program, as an-
nounced by Department of the
Army, is twofold: (1) it will allow
those who wish to continue their
studies for a year or more the
time required to qualify for high-
er degrees; (2) it will allow those
who wish active duty at an earlier
date an opportunity to indicate
themonth desired.
The Department stresses, how-
ever, that students will not neces-
sarily be permitted to enter on
active duty in the exact month of
their choice.

PROF. ZUMBERGE:
Dishwashing Prompts Geology Interest

T IZZI

PROF. ZUMBERGE
Inscriptions of Pen-Testers
Reveal Hidden Personalities

By JANE HOWARD
Book store owners have a unique
way of analyzing customer's char-
acters.
That's the consensus at the
stores on State St., where a brief
two-day survey was conducted of
the things people write first when
they're trying out fountain pens.
And the results, while providing
scant material for anybody's psy-
chological thesis, are interesting.
Paper Restrains Customers
"There's something about a fresh,
staring piece of white paper," ac-
cording to one pen salesman, "that
makes people feel restrained. Give
a kid a pen to try out and he al-
most never writes what's really on
his mind-he obviously pauses for
a few seconds to think what he'll
write."
"Usually," he added, "they
choose a safe line that wouldn't
incriminate anybody-like 'Uni-

versity of Michigan,' or 'this pen
scratches'."
Another store owner distinguish-
ed sharply between male and fe-
male pen customers. "The girls,"
he smiled, "seem to think there's
something disgraceful about seeing
their names written in public, ev-
en on a bookstore scratch sheet.
"If they've unconsciously scrawl-
ed their names, in trying out the
pens, they make a careful, meti-
culous effort to scratch them out
-as though they'd be blacklisted
for life if anybody saw their
names."
Males Are Duller
"But for boys," he said, "it's a
different story. They usually write
dull stuff about the pens them-
selves-nothing very telling."
A handful of scratch sheets,
kept for reference in one day's
pen-selling in a bookstore here,
revealed what may be untold hid-
den wishes on the part of the cus-
tomers. One slip of paper was cov-
ered with the notation "Pike's
Peak"-probably written by a
wanderlust-affected male, while
another bore the interest note
"U.S. Mint" - repeated several
times.
One pen customer, obviously a
music student, covered a sheet of
paper with part of a song score,
complete with treble clefs.
TYPEWRITERS
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
REPAIRED
MORRILL'S
Open Saturdays until 5 P.M.
314 S. State St. Ph. NO 8-7177
FOUNTAIN PENS REPAIRED

By ETHEL KQVITZ
"2 first became interested in ge-
ology working on an Alaskan
highway as a dishwasher in a
structure camp," Prof. James H.
Zumberge, of the geology depart-
ment said.
Prof. Zumberge, who has been
teaching elementary and glacial
geology at the University for five
years, plans to go to the Univer-
sity of Minnesota in February for
one semester.
"I'm going primarily to teach
and do research," he said.
Ice Studies
Prof. Zumberge and Prof. James
T. Wilson have been doing re-
search on the strength and other
)roperties of lake ice for the past
four years.
They are investigating how ice
behaves when stretched or put un-
der a load and what use man can
make of it.
"Minnesota has better ice con-
ditions for research than Ann Ar-
bor," Prof. Zumberge commented.
"While the ice in Ann Arbor sel-
dom exceeds one foot in thickness,
Minnesota's is much thicker."
He has done a great deal of re-
search on glacial geology. Work
for the government recently took
him to Greenland to examine lake
ice four feet thick.
Matter of Degree
"When I got off the airplane, I
asked .one of the air force men
the temperature. He said it was 20
degrees. I didn't realize until aft-
erwards that he meant 20 below.
Since it's always below zero there,
they just say 20."
When he went to the arctic por-
tion of Alaska to do research, Prof.
Zumberge said he was fascinated
by the lack of trees. Miles and
miles of barren wasteland was
something he had never seen be-
fore.
Prof. Zumberge received his de-
grees from his own state school,
the University of Minnesota. He
also studied at Duke, Colorado,
and, for one semester, here.
Prof. Zumberge and his family
will return to Ann Arbor by July
1. On August 1 he will go to the
University's field camp in Colo-
rado. In September he will be
teaching here again. I
African Trip
Lecture Topic
"What's Happening in Africa"
will be the topic of an all-day
meeting held on Saturday in the7
Wesley Lounge of the First Metho-
dist Church.,
Rev. George M. Houser will lee-
ture on "The Dynamics of the1
African Turmoil" at 10 a.m., and
on "The Struggle for Freedom in
South Africa" at 1:30 p.m. Rev.
Houser, Secretary of Americans
for South African Resistance, hasc
just returned from a four month
trip to the eight countries of
South Africa.
The meetings, sponsored by the
Ann Arbor Fellowship of Recon-
ciliation, will include a panel dis-
cussion on "The United Nations
and Africa," following Rev. Hous-
er's morning address.
Prof. Marbury Efimenco, of the
political science department will
be among those on the panel.

LOST AND FOUND

Vienna Choir
Boys To Sing
Making an appearance at 2:30
p.m. Sunday in Hill Auditorium,
the Vienna Choir Boys will present
a program of songs that have
made them facous.
Sunday's performance is entire-
ly sold out, although there is
standing room available, priced at
$1.50 for main floor and $1 for
first balcony. Standing room is on
sale at the offices of the Univer-
sity Musical Society in Burton
Tower.

RED LEATHER WALLET, small reward
if returned. Barbara Aetly, 410 Tyler,
East Quadrangle. )64A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
1950 FORD, two door, one owner, low
mileage, good tires, radio, beater. Only
$475. NO 2-7884. )166B
NEVER USED-$140 1954 Zenith Trans-
oceanic portable for $89. NO 3-2569.
)156B
1951 CHEVROLET four door, radio,
heater--Green and Real Nice. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )205B
1940 PONTIAC, two door, new rubber
and clean. The big lot across from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)203B
1952 CHEVROLET four door, radio,
heater, tow mileage. The big lot
across from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )202B
1946 FORD SEDAN, $245. Fitzgerald-Jor-
dan, Inc. 607 Detroit, Phone NO 8-8144.
)210B
LEIGHT WEIGHT BICYCLES, com-
pletely equipped, $39.95. Service on all
makes of bicycles. Kiddfe Korner, 564

LAST CALL for February grads to load
up on subscriptions at the student
special rates. Student Periodical. NO
2-3081. )54F
ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH - Campus
Tourist Home, 518 E. William (near
State). NO 3-8454. )23D
CAMPUS Men 2-Room Suites, Refrig-
erator, Student Manager NO 8-6876.
)20C
FURNISHED-Tired of living in a dog-
house and desirous of superb comfort
and convenience? Share large apt. op-
posite law quad with male student.
2nd semester. $60, plus utilities. NO
2-1878. )32D
APARTMENT-One male grad to share
nice large apartment with two others.
$34 a month. NO 2-1828. )37D

FOR RENT
FURNISHED - Two bedroom campus
apartment. Available Jan. 15 for 3-4
adults. Private bath. $140. NO 3-8454.
1170
FURNISHED: Share 3-Bedroom House.
Available Feb. 4. For male student
$60 plus utilities. NO 2-7266. 1190
ONE OR TWO GIRLS to share 4-room
furnished apt. on Arch near Packard
and State. NO 3-3472 after 5 P.M. )24C
MEN STUDENTS, double room for
Spring Semester, 131 S. Cambridge,
Phon NO2-977. 27 c:

PERSONAL

T ,.4Q A .4444n" no

LJ[ JL t7l:(If South Main, corner of Main and Mad-
ison. Phone NO 8-7187. )209B
Poil To Seek 1947PLI MOUTH-four door, radio heat-
er, snow tires, excellent condition.
Must sell. $165. NO 2-3801. )211B
"Ideas BABY BUGGY. $6.00 NO 3-8122 )

J

ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOM FOR RENT. Call NO 3-0025. )
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED: '2 pair of skis, metal edges.
One 'pair 6 foot, one pair 6 foot 4.
Carl, NO 2-7108 after 7 P.M. )5J
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE to San Francisco available for
girl. Route266. Weekrof Jan. 24. Pat
Tavidian, 320 Mosher. )41G
BUSINESS SERVICES
R.A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)10I
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Wool
sox washed also. )8I
TYPING WANTED. Reasonable rates,
Mrs. Mullet-Call NO 8-6883, 726 S.
Main St. )201
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALITY
NO 2-7787
for 2x3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr, Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8603
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20

nw,

OPENING FRIDAY 8:15 P.M.
THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
a professional arena theatre

Effectiveness of natural science
courses is the subject of a ques-
tionnaire Literary College seniors
will be asked to complete.
Part of a study being conduct-
ed by a literary college faculty
committee, the questionnaire will
be distributed to seniors with their
registration material. The stu-
dents are asked -to complete the
forms and return them after reg-
istering.
Possible Changes
Students will be asked to decide
whether present courses meet the
Literary College catalogue purpose
of "providing an understanding of
and practical experience in scien-
tific methods of description, clas-
sification, analysis, experimenta-
tion, and presentation of evidence."
Present requirements call for
students to elect 12 hours of work
in specified courses in the natural
sciences. These 12 hours must be
taken in at least two science de-
partments'and include one two-
semester sequence in a laboratory
course.
Questionnaires will be tabulated
and answers used in aiding an ad
hoc Natural Science Study Com-
mittee, composed of one represen-
tative from each of the science de-
partments, to make suggestions to
the literary school Curriculum
Committee.
Faculty To Decide
Suggestions from the Curricu-
lum Committee must be voted up-
on by the college faculty before
final decision is made.
Any seniors who have already
picked up their registration ma-
terials, but who have not received
the questionnaire, may obtain one
at the Registrar's Office in the
Administration Building.
,loin the
March of Dimes

presents

1i

I

'ATIONE

11

by JEAN ANOUILH

SATURDAY and SUNDAY 8:15 P.M.

STUDENT RATE 99c
GENERAL ADMISSION 1.65

IU~

Reservations NO 2-5915
Box Office Open 10-7

Masonic Temple
327 So. Fourth Ave.

" .. -

..

What Are You
Wearing to J-Hop?

t)

Your NwW and different formal .. . 'dancing
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"In sizes 9-15 and 10-16 . . . to 75.00
This one, creamy white net embroidered
with sparkle pastel sequins on the
flower applique and a net stole.
39.95

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