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January 13, 1955 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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3

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

camps, resorts, or in industry. Those
interested should register with the Bu-
reau of Appointments at this special
meeting in Angell Hall, Auditorium C,
Thurs., Jan. 13, at 4:00 p.m. If you
would like the Bureau to assist you in
obtaining a job this summer it is ur-
gent that you be present at this meet-
ing.
. f
Library Hours During the Examination
Period and Between Semesters - The
General Library will be open until 10:00
p.m. on Saturdays, Jan. 15 and 22, to
allow opportunity for study before ex-
aminations. The customary Sun. sched-
ule will be maintained Jan. 16 and 23.
Service will be offered in the Main
Reading Room, the Periodical Reading
Room, and at the Circulation desk from
2:00-6:00 p.m. Books from other parts of
the building which are needed for Sun.
use will be made available in the Pe-
riodical Reading Room if requests are
made by Sat. of an assistant in the
reading room where the books are us-
ually shelved. The Social Science Study
Hall will be open Sun., Jan. 16 and 23
from 7:00 -10:00 p.m. as usual.
The General Library will be closed
evenings beginning Thurs., Jan. 27 and
will be open daily except Sun. 8:00 a.m.-
6:00 p.m., Jan. 27-Feb. 5. Regular hours
will be resumed Feb. 7.
Divisional Libraries will be on short
schedules as soon as the examination
period ends. Hours will be posted on

the doors. Phone Ext. 652 for informa-
tion.
The Library Science Study Hall will
be open as usual Thurs. night, Jan. 27.
To all students having Library books:
1. Students having in their possession
books borrowed from the General Li-
brary or its branches are notified that
such books are due Wed., Jan. 19.
2. Students having special need for
certain books between Jan. 19 and Jan.
27 may retain such books for thdt pe-
riod by renewing them at the Charging
Desk.
3. The names of all students who have
not cleared their records at the Library
by Fri., Jan. 28 will be sent to the
Cashier's Office and their credits and
grades will be Withheld until such time
as said records re cleared in compliance
wit4 the regulations of the Regents.
Teacher Placement Interviews: Thurs.,
Jan. 13, and Fri., Jan. 14.
San Diego, California-Teacher Needs:
Mathematics, Science, Home Econom-
ics, Industrial Arts, Girls' Physical Edu-
cation, English, Social Studies, Early
and Later Elementary.
There will be a General Meeting at
4:00 p.m. Thurs. in Room 4051, Admin-
istration Bldga for all those interested
in receiving information about the San
Diego, California Public Schools. Col-
ored slides. Those having personal in-
terviews with the representatives from
(Continued on Page 4)

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EVENTS TODAY
Prof. Kurt Weitzmann of
Princeton's Institute for Advanced
Studies will deliver the third in
a series of four lectures on book
illustration at 4 p.m. today, Audi-
torium B, Angell Hall.
The subject of today's lecture
will be "Byzantium: Liturgical
Books." The final lecture will be
given at 4 p.m. tomorrow in Audi-
torium B on "Latin Middle Ages:
The End of an Old Tradition and
the Beginning of a New."
"SECURITY in South East Asia"
will be the subject of a talk by
Edwin F. Stanton, former ambas-
sador to Thailand, at the Political
Science Roundtable at 7:45 p.m.
today in the Rackham Amphi-
theater.
False Donation
Seekers in City
Ann Arbor is being hit by im-
posters requesting donations for a
postal letter carrier association,
according to warnings issued by
the Chamber of Commerce and
echoed today by Ann Arbor detec-
tives.
According to Detective Sergeant
Claude Damron, the phony solic-
itors have official forms of the
National Association of Rural Car-
riers. They have called localities
and told them an agent of their
Association would be around to
pick up a ten dollar donation.
Any request for such a dona-
tion should be reported immediate-
ly to the city police.
Join the
March of Dimes
ORPH EUM
Coming FRIDAY
Husband ... Wife and
Lover Find a New
Design for Living
... and Loving!
"Gay! "Out of this
Captivating!" world!"
-N. Y. Mirror -N. Y. News
DE SICA - MIRANDA
"One
of the
- Rcdbook
EXTRA-
"SATIN SLIPPERS"
BALLET

Storeroom
Now Used
As MapLab
By NORM BARR
Somewhat hidden directly be-
low the front stairway of Angell
Hall is the cartography labora-
tory.
Under the direction of Prof.
Charles M. Davis and Allen Hell-
man, the lab is used to train future
mapmakers.
The present location of the car-
tography lab was originally in-
tended as a storeroom. However,
overcrowded conditions in the Uni-r
versity forced the language de-
partment to utilize this space as a
lab.
Army Map Service
Although there are a few cours-
es in cartography offered to un-
dergraduates, most of the courses
are open only to grad students.
In 1951 in an effort to ease its
critical shortage of cartograph-
ers, the Army chose Michigan as
one .of 22 schools in the nation to
offer this program. "Cartographic
Techniques," and "Aerial Photo
Interpretations" are some of the
courses offered.
The lab makes all kinds of maps
for textbooks and illustrative pur-
poses. At this time, maps are be-
ing prepared for a textbook in
world geography which is being
written by Prof. George Kish.
'Atom-Smasher'
One of the machines which is
used in the lab is the Salzman
projector. Nicknamed the "Atom-
smasher" by the staff, this ma-
chine is used to increase or de-
crease the size of maps by as much
as five times. It is the only ma-
chine of its kind now being used
in a college cartography lab.
The lab also has its own collec-
tion of maps. Prof. Davis esti-
mates the total number of maps
td be around 4500, with 1000 of
them being wall maps. Although
this collection in particular is not
to be used for map reference, a
map reference section can be
found in the general library.
Dial 2-2513 Schedule
rInformation
."The
World's
Most
Beautiful
Animal!"

-Daily-Dean Morton
PAUL CARR (Haemon), Irma p.m. tomorrow at the Dramatic
Hurley (Antigone) and Ralph Arts Center.
risye(A(Cr gon)playthainThe play will run during the
Drischell (Creon) play the leading remainder of this weekend and
roles in the Jean Anouilh play will be presented during the two
"Antigone," which will open 8:15 following weekends.
'U' Professors Give Opinions
On Present, Future of ETV

Leads in 'Antigone'

By TAMMY MORRISON
"The goal of Educational Televi-
sion should be communication, not
perfection," said Prof. William C.
Morse of the education school.
Prof. Morse and several other
faculty members who have ap-
peared on TV shows for the Uni-
versity Television Office were
asked for their reactions to and
feelings about ETV in general.
"My first reaction was missing
the stimulation and interaction
that you get from a classroom au-
dience," said Prof. Adelia M.
Beeuwkes, of the School of Public
Health, who extended her work on

I

pr.o
Starting FRIDAY
He Blazed a Trail
For The Iron Horse!

. MANON
(French)
with Cecile Aubry
Michel Auclair
Saturday 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday 8:00 only

the "TV Hour" and "Michigan Re-
port" to include a short stint on
NBC's "Home."
Dr. Harry A. Towsley of the
medical school said that the per-
former's -original feeling of tense-
ness continues more on TV than
in a classroom because he has no
way of gauging his performance.
"At least, in class," he continued,
"you know if your students are
asleep or not."
Need for Adjustment
"From teaching in a classroom
to teaching on TV, is not a sim-
ple transition," said Prof. James
H. Zumberge, of the geology de-
partment. He added that most of
the adjustment has to come from
the professor because from the
producer's point of view, the pro-
fessor is more actor than teacher.
From the teacher's point of view,
he continued, a good lecture re-
quires a high degree of informali-
ty, and after so many rehearsals
and dry runs, he loses his original
exhuberance and enthusiasm.
Prof. Phillip S. Jones of the
mathematics department, on the
other hand, thinks that careful
rehearsal is worthwhile and im-
portant. Prof. Beeuwkes agreed,'
saying, "Any faculty member must
realize it will take endless hours
to do a good job."
Faculty Concurment
All the faculty members agreed
that ETV has an enormous fu-
ture. Prof. Jones summed up the
general feeling by saying that
there were a number of possibili-
ties for doing effective teaching by
TV, particularly where adult audit-
ences are concerned, and suggest-
ed that some things, especially
subjects needing demonstrations,
might even be taught better by
television..
If school enrollments become too
big, TV may extend the useful-
ness of the teacher. Prof. Jones
concluded that "people interested
in education must avoid being
snobbish or derisive because some
of the shows on TV are on a low
intellectual level. The answer cer-
tainly does not lie in saying, 'We
won't have anything to do with
it."'

Informality
Rule of Day
For Co-ops
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is
an interpretive account of co-op liv-
ing.)
By DONNA HANSON
"People usually get the impres-
sion that co-opers are extreme in-
dividualists.
"But, they couldn't be such ex-
tremists and co-operate the way
they do," said Irene Stone, Grad.
housemother at Lester Co-op.
Girls at Lester House 'regard
their co-op as a home where in-
formality is the keynote in cos-
tume, custom and cuisine. Unlike
the University dormitories, Sun-
day dinners at co-ops require no
"musts" in wearing apparell such
as nylons and heels. Thesemeals
are often attended in blue jeans,
slacks or more formal dress, de-
pending solely upon the wearer's
choice.
Individual Chefs
Each in their turn, the women
don a big white apron and follow,
to the utmost of their ability, the
weekly menus which are made out
by student co-op meal planners.
Occasionally, the "chef" will
make an appearance before dinner
and announce, "Well, it's pretty
bad." Then, after seeing the fall-
en faces of her fellow co-opers,
she quickly reassures them with,
"It's not that bad."
It makes little difference to the
co-opers if the cook for the day is
an expert or a novice in culinary
art. In either case, the food disap-
pears just as quickly. A few may
remark jokingly that the biscuits
are pretty hard tonight, but they
know their turn to prepare the
meal is not far away.
The co-opers also enjoy 24-hour
kitchen privileges at Lester. "Can.,
you imagine seeing 12 girls frying
eggs at one o'clock in the morn-
ing?" asked Jeanne Maran, '6.
"That's us."
Dining daily at Lester are four
male boarders who also do their
share in maintaining'the house.
Some Entertainment
For entertainment, the Lester
co-opers have parties, stage infor'.
mal scrabble or bridge games. Ev-
ery other Sunday night, a folk
sing is held at the house where
three or four students play guitars
while the other gather around
"turk fashion" on .the floor and
sing in accompaniment.
The women who live at Lester
work together and co-operate by
maintaining their house so that
they can live at the University as
inexpensively as possible.
"Living here is like living at
home," said Shirley Ching, '56 d.
"I chose it in Hawaii before I
even arrived here. I liked the idea
of co-operative living, and the
girls here are more friendly than
those in dormitories. It's because
the house is smaller, I guess."
ANTA Expansion
Stressed by Swire
"Encouraging the living theater"
was stressed by Willard Swire who
delivered the speech assembly lec-
ture yesterday.
Swire, executive director of the
American National Theater and
Academy, claimed that this en-.
couragement could be achieved by
an expansion of ANTA.
He explained that one of the
purposes of ANTA, the only the-
atrical group to have a Congres-
sional Charter, is to aid in the

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There are no stars like these stars! There's no
story like this story-it's 20th Century-Fox's
heart-warming saga of a show business family
who grew up in the greatest
business on earth!
DARRYL F. ZANUCK presents
IRVING BERLIN'S
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TONIGHT AT 8
Department of Speech Presents
2ND LAB. PLAYBILL
"A Connecticut Comedy",
By LEO ROC KAS,
Teaching Fellow, Department of English
"Careless Wilderness"
By BETHANY WILSON,
1939 Hopwood Award Winner
"The Foolish One "
By PAUL REBILLOT,
Graduate Student, Department of Speech

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Color by DE LUXE
In the wonder of 4-Track. Higzh-Fidelity

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ft- MARILYN
(OhhiA k II.

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