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January 12, 1955 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1955-01-12

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WAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. JANTTARV 72_ IMIC

PAGE POUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY 1I~nWV~T)AV 1ANTTTA1~V 1' io~

rra:..vx a:e arns dtsPlllt#iluZ 1(,r 1. 7JJ

Funds for Davs Show Unsettlng
Regents, Faculty Difference,
THERE IS something particularly unsettling American Association of University Professors
in the fact that faculty members of the to which most of the faculty belong, only those
College of Literature, Science and the Arts have members dismissed on moral grounds should
collected $2,000 for H. Chandler Davis, former not receive compensation.v
mathematics instructor. Also, a vote by the literary college executive
Davis, you will recall, is an instructor "per- committee was "for" severance pay for the
sonnavo g rata"athe Unersitr.Aftrheris dismissed members, Davis and Prof. Mark
sonna non grata" at the University. After Nickerson, formerly of the pharmacology de-
failure to cooperate With the House Un-Amer- prmnt
ican Activities Subcommittee, the Board of partment.
Regets nd resientHather ecied hat The letter sent out by the Bott committee
Regents and President Hatcher decided that stressed this latter point, and originally hoped
to get $5,000 which was Davis' salary.
At the same time the Regents also decided It could be there are other reasons. No doubt
that his case was such that no severance pay some faculty members feel that the dismissal
was due him, itself was unjust. This fund, to them, then
constitutes a protest of the entire Regental and
CONSIDERING these decisions, and consid-'Administrative decision, and would be ex-
ering that the action was taken, as stated, tended to providing aid for Prof. Nickerson
in the best interests of the University, why had he not found a new position at the Uni-
should the literary college faculty feel that a versity of Manitoba.
fund in behalf of Dr. Davis was needed?

.-,-

S
e
d
e
e
e
d
t
,l
1

"Odd How Many Of Them Drop Out, Isn't It?"
g .
LOR
L~rl"TER TO ' DITO

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 17 to January 27, 1955
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time of
class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no confliet or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

Prof. Raoul Bott, of the mathematics depart-
ment, who heads the "Emergency Fund Com-
mittee for H. C. Davis" says there are a variety
of reasons why the faculty chose to donate.
since 100 of the College faculty members
signed as sponsors of the fund, in this way
disagreeing with the Regents and President
Hatcher; and since 100 teachers constitute a
sizeable group at this University, it might
be interesting to speculate as to the reasons of
the fundraisers.
IT IS probable that many of the donors con-
tributed out of sympathy to Dr. Davis. The
mathematics teacher has a wife and child, and
will find getting a new position now extremely
difficult.
Or perhaps, the donors feel that the deci-
sion by the Regents not to give severance pay
was unjust. According to the principles of the

W HICHEVER of the above reasons apply to
the fundraisers, and most probably all
three are valid for various donors, it is clear
that 100 faculty men who sponsored the drive
disagree with the Regents on one point. The
faculty members would give Davis $5,000, the
Regents wouldn't.
The number is too large to be in disagree-
ment with the Regents about as serious an
issue as this. Considering that all the men are
from the literary college, and that no other
faculty men are contacted, the number com-
ing from this concentrated group is especially
too large.
A split this wide and important is ;un-
settling, and cause for sincere examination
in the hopes that the Regents and literary
college faculty may mind a much closer future
agreement.
-Murry Frymer

TODAY AND TOMORROW

By WALTER LIPPMANN
IT IS an important sign of the times that in
Indo-China, which is now just about the
most vulnerable region in the non-Communist
world, a reduction of military forces has been
decided upon. The French Expeditionary Army
is being withdrawn gradually. The Vietnamese
army is to be reduced by almost half from its
present force level of 170,000 men. And the
United States Is intending to reduce still fur-
ther the ground forces in being available for
local wars.
This reduction of armaments is taking place
at a time when the non-Communist govern-
ment, which we are supporting, is losing power
and influence against the infiltration and the
pressure of Ho Chi Minh's revolutionary un-
derground. We would be deceiving ourselves if
we supposed that the reduction of ground forces
in Indo-China is, or that it can be, compen-
sated by an increase in the naval and air forces
assigned to that part of the world.
The essence of the problem is that Indo-
China is not being invaded by a Chinese
army much less by a Soviet army. It is being
infiltrated and subverted from village to vil-
lage by native Indo-Chinese revolutionists. The
French army has been unable to suppress them,
and it is plain that these guerrilla forces in
the villages cannot be conquered with airplanes
and bombs. We are facing the fact that the
revolutionary movement in Indo-China is not
the kind of organized military forces which
military power of the Western type is fitted to
deal with. Our military quandary is a little as
if we equipped the local police with tanks and
then ordered them to suppress juvenile delin-
quency and racketeering. Nobody would doubt
that the weapon was powerful but no one could
deny that it was unsuited to the situation.
WE ARE reducing Western military power in
'1 Indo-China and also the native forces that
the West has been training and equipping. We
are doing this because these forces cannot be
used effectively against the revolutionary
movement. Why not? Because the non-Com-
munist government in Saigon is weak. It does
not have popular support and it is unable to
make the decisions and to take the measures
which might win popular support. It is too
weak even to use substantial economic aid. A
People which is in a state of civil war can,
however, be rallied only by a strong govern-
ment.
In the old days the great powers solved the

problem of weak local governments, which
threatened to fall into the orbit of a rival
power, by intervening with their own forces.
That was the old aggression. But that solution
is ruled out in Southeast Asia. The French
spent seven years of horrid fighting attempting
to impose it. When we came actively into the
picture, one of the first things we insisted up-
on was the grant of sovereign independence to
the Vietnamese state. Now that Vietnam is
sovereign, Western military power cannot be
used to make it a government strong enough
to cope with Ho Chi Minh's revolutionists.
IrN DECIDING for a reduction of the military
forces on the ground, we are recognizing it
as one of the facts of life that while military
power can contain the Chinese army and the
the Soviet armed forces, it cannont contain a
native revolution. Does it follow that we are
resigning ourselves to the "loss" of Indo-China,
and after that, of Southeast Asia.
I do not think that it does follow. I do not
mean that the loss cannot happen, or that it
will not happen, but only that it need not
happen necessarily. We are much too ready
to see the issue in terms of black or white:
either the country will become a satellite or it
must be, like South Korea under Dr. Rhee and
Formosa under Chiang, irreconcilable and mili-
tant. But in real life black or white are not
the only practical possibilities. A large part
of humanity is neither black nor white but
gray, unwilling and unable to let the issue
be drawn too sharply.
GUESS is that the best we can look for-
ward to for Indo-China is that it will be-
come a gray area-like Burma, like Indonesia,
like, if you please, Finland. The non-Commun-
ist world will be doing very well indeed, better
than it has had much reason to believe it would
do, if the outcome in Indo-China is a govern-
ment which manages not to be a satellite of
Peking. The West should be witnessing a bril-
liant outcome, given the hard realities of the
situation, if Indo-China-avoiding hostility to-
wards Red China-found its international place
in the orbit of India.
A policy conceived in this fashion is com-
patible with the decision to reduce the French
and the Vietnamese forces in Indo-China and
to reduce our own standing army. If this, or
something very like it, is not what we have in
mind, what do we mean by a reduction of
armaments in the face of a worsening situa-
tion?
(Copyright, 1955, N.Y. Her. Trib., Inc.)

Music Review.. ..
To the Editor:
WAS shocked to read your mu-
sic critic's writelup of the con-
cert presented by your University
band Jan. 7.
Naturally, members of your
staff cannot all be of high ability
every year, as you probably utilize
the services of students. However,
for the sake of journalistic integ-
rity and in order that the public
be not misled some sort of a re-
write should be given.
Having heard most of the bet-
ter college bands, plus the four
services bands, plus the best Can-
adian military band, all in the
past 13 months, and knowing that
the concert in Hill Friday was su-
perior to those bands, I can only
say that The Michigan Daily
should get competent reporters or
stay out of the field that cannot
be adequately covered.
-R. S. Welt:
Band Concert,...
To the Editor:
THIS LETTER is written to ex-
press how much the directors
of the Michigan School Band and
Orchestra Association enjoyed the
fine program presented by the
University of Michigan Band in
its Winter Concert last Friday
night in Hill Auditorium.
Contrary to the comments on
the music and the technique of
the band voiced in yesterday's
Daily by the reporter assigned to
cover the program, the members
of this association enthusiastical-
ly supported the performance in
every respect.
In conclusion it can be stated
that for many years this concert
will stand as one of the highlights
of the 10th Annual Mid-Western
Conference of Music Educators.
-Fred N. Wiest
Sayonara .. ,
To the Editor:
AMA Japanese student who has
studied linguistics for two and
a half years in Ann Arbor.
I left Ann Arbor on Dec. 18 and
I am planning to sail from Se-
attle on Jan. 25 for Japan. As I
did not have time to say Arigato
(Thank You) and Sayonara
(Good-bye) to everybody, I am
going to send this note to The Mi-
chigan Daily. ,
I appreciate it very much that
many people kindly h ped me
spiritually, academically, and fi-
nancially while I was in Ann Ar-
bor.
-Satoshiko Koide
Sixty-Fifth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigar under the
authority o the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Eugene Hartwig.Managing Editor
Dorothy Myers...,........City Editor
Jon Sobeoff,, *.....Editorial Director
Pat Roelos.Associate City Editor
Becky Conrad.........Associate Editor
Nan swinehart.......Associate Editor
Dave Livingston .........Sports Editor
Hanley Gurwin ... Assoc Sports Editor
Warren Wertheimer
.Associate Sports Editor
Roz Shlimovitz . Women's Editor
Joy Squires ..Associate Women's Editor
Janet Smith Associate Women's Editor
Dean Morton . Chief Photographer
Business Staff
Lois Pollak ....Business Manager
Phil Brunskill, Assoc. Business Manager
Bil Wise.......Advertising Manager
Mary Jean Monkoski Finance Manager
Telebhone NO 23-24-1

Hawaii Foreign .. .
To the Editor:
AFRIEND of mine from Hawaii
received a post card from the
International Center "to remind"
him "that all persons who are not
citizens of the United States are
required to register with the Im-
migration and Naturalization Ser-
vice during the month of Janu-
ary." Will the International Cen-
ter never realize that Hawaii, as
a territory, is an integral part of
the United States (as distinguish-
ed from merely belonging to the
United States)? And that people
born in Hawaii are American citi-
zens by birth? And the fact that
the provisions of the Constitution
extend to Hawaii, with all of the
responsibilities (including taxes),
but not all the rights because of
Hawaii's territorial status?
I wrote a similar letter a year
ago to The Daily, so it seems that
the IC needs to be "educated." I
am inclined to think that before
the IC can function efficiently
and effectively, they should know
what areas are not "foreign," and
therefore, parts of the United
States. MayIsuggest that they
learn something about their own
country?
.-Alvin K. Chock, Grad.
* * *
DP Needs .. .
To the Editor:
I WAS glad to see your Jan. 5 ar-
ticle on the "American Friends
for Russian Freedom." In relation
to this, both this group, whose ad-
dress is 270 Park Ave., New York
City 17, N.Y., and the Internation-
al Rescue Committee, an outfit
doing similar rehabilitation and
resettlement work with DP's from
all European and some Asian
countries, and whose address is
International Rescue Committee
Clothes Warehouse, Greene Street,
Brooklyn, N.Y., are in definiteand
continuous need of old clothes:
men's and women's, of all sizes
and types, provided only that they
are in reasonably complete con-
dition.
There are still a fair number of
DP's in Europe, and those escap-
ing into Germany are at present
having a rather hard time, for the
Bonn Government has suddenly
decided that these people are
"more trouble than they are
worth," and is not particularly in-
terested in helping them any
more.
It is quite easy and inexpensive
to send these clothes, by merely
rolling the material up tightly,
putting some paper around it, and
sending it off as "fourth class
mail," i.e. "merchandise." Both
phrases must be on the package.
I hope others can find, now that
Christmas has gone by, that they
can send along a few items to
these two outfits.
--Harry Adams, Grad.

MONDAY
TUESDAY

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

SPECIAL PERIODS

Literature,
English 1, 2
Zoology 1
Botany 1, 2, 122
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54.
101, 153
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32
Russian 1
Political Science 1
Sociology 1, 54, 60,
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11. 31
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 20, 23
Psychology 31

Science and the Arts
Monday, January 17
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 2i1
Friday, January 21
Saturday, January 22
Saturday, January 22
Monday, January 24
Monday, January 24
Tuesday, January -25
Wednesday, January 26

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

Wednesday, January 19
Saturday, January 22
Tuesday, January 25
Monday, January 17
Tuesday, January 18
Tuesday, January 18
Thursday, January 27
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Monday, January 24.
Wednesday, January 26
Tuesday, January 18
Thursday, January 27
Thursday, January 20
Monday, January 17

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING /

English 11
Drawing 3
M.I.E. 136
C.E. 23, 151
Drawing 1
M.I.E. 135
C.M. 107
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54,
101, 153
Drawing 2
E.E. 5
P.E. 31, 32
E.M. 1,' 2
C.M. 113, 115
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 20, 23

Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Friday, January 21
Saturday, January 22
Monday, January 24
Monday, January 24
Tuesday, January 25

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5 .
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

DREW PEARSON:
Washington
:.Ierr yaGo-
Round
WASHINGTON - The White
House has finally decided to
jettison some of its, political lia-
bilities. In particular, it has given
notice to bright, nosy, ambitious
Charles Willis that he will be out
of a job in 45 days.
Charley Willis is the White
House aide who has made himself
the "Secretary in charge of jobs,"
the "Secretary in charge of hand-
ing out TV licences," and the "Se-
cretary in charge of interstate
commerce." A nice guy, but too
busy for his own good; he has
stepped on more people's toes than
anyone, save Sherman Adams.
Even though his father-in-law
is none other tha4 Harvey Fire-
stone of the Firestone Rubber
Company, friend and heavy sup-
porter of Ike's, Willis is being
given the ax.
Gen. Harry Vaughan got a lot
of publicity for pulling wires for
pals and handing out deep freezes,
but Charley Willis has made Vau-
ghan a piker in comparison. In-
stead of dealing in deep freezes,
he has dealt in TV licenses worth
millions and airline routes worth
even more. He has had two FCC
commissioners, John Doerfer and
Robert E. Lee, in the palm of his
hand and hasn't hesitated to tell
them bluntly and baldly to give
TV licenses to certain publishers
because they helped the Republi-
can Party.
Particularly, Willis passed this
word to the FCC regarding the
hotly oontested TV license in the
St. Petersburg, Fla., area. When
the license was about to go to the
St. Petersburg Times, he stepped
in, told Republican Commission-
ers on the FCC to reverse them-
selves and reward a group domi-
nated by the Richmond, Va., News-
Leader and Times-Dispatch, which
supported Eisenhower.
Stepped on Civil Service
WILLIS ALSO got in wrong -
even with Republicans - be-
cause of his zeal in planting Re-
publicans in career jobs. In doing
so he won the name "Jobs-for-
Republicans" Willis. What caused
the trouble was the way he rode
roughshod over Civil Service laws,
thereby incurring certain Demo-
cratic investigations.
Juggling jobs, of course, is a
thankless assignment. In the first
place, Willis had more available
applicants than available jobs. He
also had to clear each applicant
with three or four Senators and
Congressmen, get the endorsement
of the local politicians, check with
the GOP national committee, keep
the White House happy-yet sup-
posedly not violate the Civil Serv-
ice laws against political appoint-
ments.
At first, Willis got into "hot wa-
ter" with the Republicans on Cap-
itol Hill, who complained they
weren't consulted. Then, he work-
ed out a System for clearing fed-
eras jobs quietly with GOP Senia.
tors and congressmen. But his plan
leaked to the papers and stirred
up a public protest.
Now, the Democrats are laying
for Willis for ciricumventing the
Civil Service laws. Right-wing Re-
publicans are sore at him for not
allotting them enough jobs. They
have also embarked on a cam-
paign of sniping at the "palace
guard" around President Eisen-
hower. Willis is one of ,the most
vulnerable members of the "pal-
ace guard." So the White House
has concluded that its sad-eyed
patronage boss is expendable. He
has been given polite but firm no-

tice to resign.
Note-Some Republicans inter-
pret the firing of Charley Willis
as a sign Ike is clearing the decks
in order to get ready to run again.
Nothing could be further from the
case. First, Ike knows little about
these patronage matters, in fact
little about detailed matters
around the White House. He speci-
fically asked not to be bothered.
Second, the real reason for Willis'
exit is to beat the Democrats to
the punch when they start prob-
ing Civil Service scandals.
FBI Intervenes
J. EDGAR HOOVER, who de-
serted his usual nonpolitical
position to support Senator Mc-
Carthy, has made another inter-
esting backstage move. Two of his
G-men came up to the Senate the
other day and advised Sen. Harley
Kilgore, Chairman of the Senate
Judiciary Committee, to retain
Richard Arends as counsel of the
Judiciary Committee.
This is highly unusual advice.
For members of the executive
branch of government do not ad-
vise the legislative branch in the
American system of checks and
balances, especially when there is
an inference that the FBI would
not cooperate if Arends were re-
moved.'
(Copyright, 1955, by the Bell Syndicate)
monial Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Fire-
side Room, Lane Hall.

I

I,

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Literature, Science and the Arts
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must, be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Engineer-
ing Building before January 7 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

WHAT THEY'RE SAYING

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

THE GENERALLY prevalent assumption that
enrollment in an educational institution is
a matter of privilege rather than a right, places
the American student at this time in an un-
happily vague position. He knows he has the
right to freedom of imquiry and expression
possessed by all citizens, but he does not know
the degree or manner in which this right may
be exercised in a particular institution where
his presence is supposedly a matter of grace.
Nor, if conflict arises about his right, does he
ordinarily encounter established rules and pro-
cedures for the consideration of his cases. Be-
cause of this picture the American Civil Liber-

Georgia editor and political figure, attacked the
editors of the college paper, calling them "a
little handful of sissies and misguided squirts,"
and said that "the time has come to clear out
all of these institutions of all Communist in-
fluences and the crazy idea of mixing and
mingling of the races which was sponsored in
this country by the Communist Party." He
added that "the state of Georgia pays a big
price to educate its college students. If the
state is willing to spend this money it has the
right to control what is taught and what is
done at the university." The student editors
resigned, and were followed by other editors
who also resigned after faculty censorship was
imposed; but the final spring edition of the

(Continued from Page 2)
Lectures
American chemical Society Lecture.
Wed., Jan. 12, 8:00 p.m. in Room 1300
Chemistry. Dr. W. L. Gore of the Poly-
chemicals Department of E. I DuPont
de Nemours and Co, Inc will speak on
"The Design and Analysis of Experi-
ments"
Academic Notices
Seminar: Dr. Donald Merchant,
"Quantitation in tissue culture studies
js applied to long tern. cell cultiva-
tion." Room 2501 East Medical Building,
Wed.. Jan. 12. at11 o'clock-

Application of Mathematics to Social
Science Will meet Thur., Jan. 13, Room
3401 Mason Hall, 4:00-5:30 p.m. F. Mos-
teller will speak on "Experimental Ap-
plication of Stochbstic Models."
Seminar in Applied Mathematics will
meet Thurs., Jan. 13, at 4:00 p.m. in
Room 247 West Engineering. Dr. John
H. Giese will speak on "Canonical Equa-
tions for Irrotational Pseudo-stationary
Flow."
Doctoral Examination for Paul Allan
Lobo, Chemical Engineering; thesis:
"Chemical Processing at High Tempera-
ture and High Pressure," Thurs., Jan.
13, 3201 East Engineering Bldg., at 3:30
n.m. ChairmnC L M. Sianeevich.

Events Today
Episcopal Student Foundation. Stu-
dent Breakfast at Canterbury House,
Wed., Jan. 12, after the 7:00 a.m. Holy
Communion. Student-Faculty Tea from
4:00-6:00 p.m. Wed., Jan. 12, at Canter-
bury House.
Wesleyan Guild. Wed., Jan. 12. Mid-
week worship in the chapel, 5:15 p.m.
Mid-week Tea in the lounge, 4:00-5:15
p.m.
W.A.A. House Athletic Managers
Meeting Jan. 12 at 3:10 p.m. Ensian Pic-
ture will be taken.

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