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January 12, 1955 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PALE FIVE

THE MICHIGAN DAILYPAGE FiVE

MODERN-DAY PORTIAS--Much of the life of a law student at
the University is spent in doing research poring over 'huge' vol-
umes of legal material. Mary Anderson, freshman in Law school,
does some research in the law library for a case brief which she
is preparing for the next day's class.
Males Give Approval
Of.LaW School Coeds

Committee '
Chooses Skits
For Program
Skit Night Scenarios
For Spring Weekend
Approved by Judges
Skit Night committee for Spring
Weekend announces the scenarios
that were approved for further
competition toward the final deci-
sion of which houses will present
skits during the weekend.
. Chosen from 19 entries were
scenarios entered by: Adams
House-Chicago House; Alpha Del-
la Pi-Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Alpha
Gamma Delta-Theta Xi; Allen
Rumsey-Victor Vaughn; Sigma
Alpha Mu-Delta Delta Delta; Sig-
ma Phi Epsilon-Alpha Phi; Gom-
berg House-Helen Newberry; Hen-
derson House-Theta Chi; Hobbs
House-Phi Gamma Delta and Kap-
pa Kappa Gamma-Kappa Sigma.
These houses will now write
complete scripts just as they
would be produced on Skit Night.
These scripts will also be judged
and the final winners will then be
determined.
Judging the scenarios were Prof.
Robert F. Haugh of the English
department, Barbara Burstein,
Stan Leiken, Tom Chamberlain
and Nancy Fisher of the Spring
Weekend Central Committee.
A meeting will be held at 4:30
p.m. today in Rm. 3A of the Union
for winning houses to learn what
is expected of them in their scripts.
Final scripts are due Tuesday,
Feb. 1, in Rm. 3A of the Union.
Houses that would like their
scenarios may pick them up any
lay after 1 p.m. in Rm. 3A of the
Union.
The Skit Night program, which
is sponsored by the Union and the
Women's Athletic Association, is
under the direction of Nancy Fish-
er and Tom Chamberlain.
Two years ago the first prize
was won by Gamma Phi Beta and
Sigma Phi Epsilon, who presented
"Face on the Barroom Floor."

Upperclassmen Give Exam Advice

By MARJORIaE BLUTTMAN
"Do anything -- but just don't
clutch." This statement, from a
senior coed, seemed to typify most
of the advice given to freshmen
on preparation for final exams.
Since this is the time of the
year that freshmen experience
those butterfles of apprehension
or perhaps slight sensations of
drowning, University sophomore,
junior and senior students were
willing to offer some experienced
advice.
"I've found that keeping a level
head takes my mind off worry,"
suggested William Siegal, '56. "I
try not to get agitated by pending
examinations."
'See A Movie'
Another advocate of relaxation
before tests is Patricia Brophy, '57.
She finds that her best results
come from seeing a movie or lis-
tening to records before the exam.
"It lessens the tension, and I do
much better on my finals when
I'm relaxed."
Several other upperclassmen
stated that freshmen should not
try to learn the entire course in
two or three nights of cramming.
As Jack Lichty, '56, put it: "If
you don't know it in the middle of
January, you won't know it for
the exams."
Lichty explained that his meth-
od is to make a general outline of
the course for review rather than
learn many little facts. He said
emphatically that "cramming does
no good at all."
In the opinions of some, cram-
ming appears to have its benefits.
Marjorie Greenfield, '56, a firm
believer in cramming, studies ev-
erything in the course before mak-
ing an outline. She prefers her
own room for study because she's
"used to working there" and con-
centrates on only one subject an
evening.
Like other things, cramming has
its degrees. One can cram until
the evening before the exam or
right down to the final minute.
Do It In Style
One junior student with a four-
point average said that he had
tried "all the tricks." I'm not say-
ing that one should cram-many
subjects don't call for it-but if
you do, it should be done in style.

An orientation program for the
590 freshmen entering next semes-
ter has already been planned, ac-
cording to Bob Blossy and Sue
Pricker, chairmen of Orientation
Week for men and women respec-
tively.
Men entering the University will
see for the first time all the blue
prints for the addition to the Un-
ion and have a special tour of the
building. Their traditional stag
night will feature the Michigan-
Minnesota football game film nar-
rated by Wally Weber, assistant
football coach of the University.
Freshmen women will have a
tour of the League and will be in-
troduced to members of the
League Council who will tell them
about facilities open to women.
Orientation leaders will be
those who have had experience
during the fall. Bloosey remarked
that all students who have not
had previous experience will have
an opportunity to conduct groups

in the fall of this year. He empha-
sized that orientation work is a
full time job. "The leader must
want to help new students, give
them confidence and encourage
them.". He also said that knowl-
edge of the campus is essential
so the leader can cope with the
many questions new students ask.
Ivan Parker, Assistant to the
Dean of Men, will work with Rob-
ert Garfield, Assistant to the Di-
rector of Registration and Rec-
ords, on the Orientation week pro-
grams.
Students who fill out applica-
tions for this position will be'in-
terviewed and asked to answer
questions which the interviewing
committee thinks leaders should
know. They will be rated accord-
ingly.
Leaders of men's and women's
groups will plan inter-group mix-
ers to help new students meet each
other.

-aly-unucKelsey
DON'T CLUTCH--Amidst the magazines, coke bottles, novels,
typewriter, blaring radio and smoking equipment, Bobbie Evans,
'57, might have the right book to study for final exams.

Orientation Program
Planned for Freshmen

By ELAINE EDMONDS
Present day 'Portias' in the Uni-
versity law school find conditions
today far different from those
which confronted the first women
students 85 years ago.
In 1870 when Harriett Ada Pat-
ton and Sarah Killgore Wertman
enrolled as the first coeds in law
school they found themselves in
the same position as the other 33
women then attending the Uni-
versity. At that time women were
T treated with indifferent courtesy,
college journalism had its fling at
them and many boarding places
were not open to the female stu-
dents.
At present 20 of the 710 stu-
dents in law school are, women.
During the college year 1950-51
female enrollment in the law
,school reached an all time high
of 41.
Men and women are admitted to
law school on the same basis. Un-
dergraduate marks and standings
in law school admission tests are
the factors which determine if a
student will be accepted or not.
In 1927 while speaking before a
class of legal students Dean Bates,
then Dean of law school, is quoted
as saying that for a woman, the
career of a lawyer is a hard one,
because many legal firms feel that
y a pretty young lawyer will be a
distraction.
Although some male lawyers may
be inclined to be rather skeptical
of their female counterparts at
first, they soon discovered that
the women are equally serious and
intent in their pursuit of legal
knowledge.
The male lawyers indicate their
whole-hearted approval of the wo-
men barristers. Roger Oetting says,
"They're really great; they're bril-
liant and very nice to have
around!" Pete Vestevich com-
m nts, "On the average the wo-
men seem to be better prepared

and sharper than the men in the
class."
One of the first questions asked
of the woman law student is usu-
ally "What made you decide to
enter law school?" Although each
has a different answer they are
basically alike. The coed lawyers
are interested in the field of law
and the possibilities which legal
training offers.
Many of the women students
envy the men living in the law-
yer's club because they are liter-
ally surrounded by an atmosphere
of "the law." Coeds miss the op-
portunities for after-class dis-
cussions and the comparing of in-
terpretations and analyses which
the men in the lawyer's club en-
joy.

Stay up all night studying, get
no sleep, take the exam, and then
you can poo out- when you finish."
This adept gentleman grimned at
his reporter's amazed expression.
"Really," he concluded, "if one
breaks up his cramming with
sleep, there will be little retention
of newly-learned facts . .."
On to someone a bit less radical.
Jackie Davie, '55, suggests that
freshmen take their last minute
studying in stride and get eight
hours of sleep the night before.
Miss Davie stressed eating a good
breakfast the morning of the
exam. "Never go to The P-Bell the
night before," she added with a
knowing smile.f
Ir the Exam
Upperclassmen agreed on what
exam-takers should do once in-
side the exam room. They said
that the student should have all
the necessary equipment - pens,
erasers and pencils. If essay ex-
ams, one should read all questions
before making a choice.
The students should jot down
ideas as he thinks of them, and he
should make an outline before
writing the final answer. He
shouldn't waste toodmuch time on
one problem, daydream or think
about the outcome of the exam.
Instead, keeping busy, writing leg-
ibly and relaxing should bring the'
desired results.
Gulantics
Final tryouts for Gulantics
will be held from 1 to 5 p.m.
Saturday in Room 3S of the
Union.
Students may contact Debbie
Shavelson, NO 2-3119, for try-
out appointments.

RED
SOLE

CASUAL
CLASSIC

Modern Age SADDLE OXFORDS
Starting the new season with greater popularity than ever.
our all-time casual favorite, the supple saddle oxford,

TEN MOST ADMIRED WOMEN:
Popularity Census Conducted by Daily'

By SUE GARFIELD
Who would you pick as "the ten
most admired women in the
world?"
University students came up
with a different list of ten than
those chosen from a cross-section
of American citizens.
For the eighth time, the Am-
erican public picked Mrs. Eleanor
Roosevelt as the woman they most
admire. She runs far ahead of
any other woman celebrity. Uni-
versity women rated her second
on their list, while the "Michigan
men" put hers as sixth.
Male Opinions
After talking to several graduate
and undergraduate men on cam-
pus, The Daily poll showed the
following results:

Clare Booth Luce as number one,
with these following:
2. Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt
3. Mrs. Mamie Eisenhower
4. Mme. Chiang Kai-shek
5. Sen. Margaret Chase Smith
6. Queen Elizabeth
7. Mrs. Oveta Culp Hobby
8. Princess Margaret
9. Miss Helen Keller
10. Mme. Vijaya Pandit
Director of the American Insti-
tute of Public Opinion, George
Gallup, interviews a cross-section
of American citizens each year,

asking what man and what wo-
man, living anywhere in the United
States, they most admire.
Gallup's Poll
In Gallup's poll, are the follow-
ing ten:

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.1

Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt
Mrs. Mamie Eisenhower
Mrs. Clare Booth Luce
Sen. Margaret Chase Smith
Queen Elizabeth
Miss Helen Keller
Mme. Chiang Kai-shek
Mrs. Oveta Culp Hobby
Mine. ViJaya Pandit
Miss Marilyn Monroe

CLASSIFIED ADS ARE SURE-FIRE RESULT GETTERS

LOOK ! L OOK!I LOOK! LUCKCY D ROOPLES!
. *. r.

i.

/Icro44 Caonpu4

I

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Queen Elizabeth
Mme. Chiang Kai-shek
Mrs. Clare Booth Luce
Sen. Margaret Chase Smith
Mrs. Oveta Culp Hobby
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt
Mrs. Mamie Eisenhower
Miss Marilyn Monroe
Miss Helen Keller
Miss Ava Gardner

LADIES
HAIRSTYLING TO
PLEASE YOU!!
It's shaping, styling
to flatter you-
--..-NO WAITING---...-m-
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

The WAA House Athletic Man-
agers will meet at 5:10 p.m. today
at the WAB. Ensian pictures will
be taken.
Michifish will meet at 7:30 p.m.
today at the pool. The Ensian pic-
tures will be taken.
During final examinations, the
League Library and Barbara Lit-
tle Listening Rooms will be open
from 9 a.m. to noon, 1:30 to 5:30
p.m. and 7 to 10 p.m., Monday,
January 17 through Wednesday,
January 26.

Mrs. Roosevelt has headed the
institute's annual "admiration
derby" in the eight years that it
has been in existence. Senator
Smith is a newcomer to the list
this year along with Marilyn Mon-
roe of Hollywood fame.
Names not mentioned on the
Gallup poll which University stu-
dents included on their list of "ad-
mired women" were Miss Ava
Gardner and Princess Margaret.

When University coeds were
asked, "the ten most admired wo-
men in the world," they came up
with several different answers in
a different order, ranking Mrs.

I

There is a
DEMAND
For young Americans care-
fully trained for successful
careers in
Foreign Trade
or
Foreign Service
Leading American business
firms have come to depend
on the American Institute for
Foreign Trade as a major
source of trained personnel
for their international opera-
tions.
A hard-hitting, intensive one-
year course at the graduate
level will give you the back-
ground you need in languag-
es, area studies and business
administration. as it obtains
to world trade.
Write to:
Admissions Committee
American Institute
for
Foreign Trade
Thundmeaird Field I.

0
HOLE IN ONE
Leonard W. Rozin
University of Kansas
PAINTBRUSH FOR PAINTING BARBER POLE
Eugene Heller
Columbia University
0
0 O 1

F

-A

PHOTO FINISH OF HORSE RACE
BY SLOW CAMERAMAN
John Davis
Bucknell University
FLY SWATTER DESIGNED TO
GIVE FLY SPORTING CHANCE
Alan M. Becker
Pomona College

I-

OBVIOUSLY, THE TITLE of the above Droodle is: 47
insectology students enjoying better-tasting Luckies
while studying 3 fireflies. All kinds of students are
bugs about Luckies. Matter of fact, college smokers
prefer Luckies to all other brands-and by a wide
margin-according to the latest and greatest of all
college surveys. Once again, the No. 1 reason: Luckies
taste better. They taste better, first of all, because
Lucky Strike means fine tobacco. Then, that tobacco
is toasted to taste better. "'It's Toasted"-the famous
Lucky Strike process-tones up Luckies' light, good-
tasting tobacco to make it taste even better .
cleaner, fresher, smoother. So, enjoy the better-tasting
cigarette ... Lucky Strike.

U6 P
#~~ roA;
Ogg f05te

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ALL-DAY SUCKER FOR DIETERS
Judith Lee Midgley
American University

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