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January 12, 1955 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-12

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T, JANUARY I2,1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

1'. JANUARY 12. 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

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Show

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Weekend

Victories

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11h9 &'ith Spit
by dove livingston

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Wins Over Wisconsin, OSU
Give Cagers First-Place Tie
Kramer, Williams, Groff sky Add Strength
Under Boards; Jorgenson Stars at Guard

OVERWHELM PURDUE:
WrestlersRely on Overall Strength

--'21

J

WITH BUT TWO WEEKS of 1955 gone indications point to one of
the most interesting, and just maybe one of the most successful,
years in recent Michigan sports history.
The relative success of the'various and sundry athletic squads
wearing the Maize and Blue is incidental-regardless of what hap-
pens the Ann Arbor sports scene is bound to be liberally sprinkled
with color.
CONSIDER the following post-January 1 happenings: A Michi-
gan basketbll team has taken a share of first place in the Big Ten
standings, and has played before a miraculously packed crowd in
Yost Field House; an undermanned Wolverine hockey team, suffer-
ing from such a dearth of manpower that it was considered by many
as good only for laughs, has walloped favored Michigan State on
two successive nights; Michigan Athletic Director H. O. "Fritz'"
Crisler has the suposedly all-powerful NCAA shivering over a threat-
ened Big Ten boycott of television rules; a prominent Chicago sports-
writer has picked Bennie Oosterbaan's 1955 football team to go un-
defeated and win the Big Ten, Rose Bowl, and mythical national ti-
ties; the proposal to switch next fall's Army-Michigan game from
Yankee Stadium to the Michigan Stadium has gained almost decisive
proportions: and, to top everything, the priceless (to Governor Wil-
liams) Paul Bunyan trophy has disappeared from its comfortable
but dusty resting place in the corner of the Michigan locker room.
To us the most encouraging of all the events of the youth-
ful year has been the early success of Coach Bill Perigo's cagers.
Nobody is predicting any Conference championship for the Wol-
verine quintet, but it is a welcome relief to go down to Yost Field
fouse and see a Michigan basketball team that one doesn't auto-
matically compare to his old igh school team.
Perigo, in his third year at the Michigan helm, has molded
a high-scoring, imaginative outfit that takes advantage of the
better points of both the fast break and a set style of offense.
As to the Michigan hockey team-two weeks ago you could have
gotten 10-1 odds that the Wolverines would not return to the Broad-
moor Ice Palace in Colorado Springs, where the Michigan pucksters
have played for the NCAA crown every year since the inception of
the tourney. Today the critics still aren't proclaiming Michigan as
y the greatest collegiate hockey team in the country, but they are a
little leary of what magic Mr. Heyliger may produce next with his
half-a-team.
* * *
Crisler, the NCAA, the Army . .
WHILE HIS ATHLETIC teams have been making hay in Ann Arbor
(the swimming, wrestling, and gymnastics aggregations haven't
been doing anything to undermine Michigan prestige, in case you
haven't noticed), in New York Crisler has been collecting even more
than his usual abundance of publicity. As spokesman for the Big Ten
in the controversy over the national television of -football, he has
mad it clear that the Western Conference will under no circum-
stances acceedsto as rigid a TV setup as last year's, when only one
game could be televised per week.
Although the Big Ten is using as its main argumentthe insist-
ance of several state legislatures that their state colleges televise
locally, it is no secret that the Conference schools would have no ob-
jections to the added revenue that television has a habit of producing.!
The funny part about the whole thing is that there are just
ten schools in the Conference, yet those ten have the NCAA and
the hundreds of institutions It represents over the proverbial
barrel. Should the Big Ten bolt the NCAA over this issue, the
Pacific Coast Conference and Notre Dame, among others, would
surely follow, and without this small but powerful group the
power's of the NCAA as it is now established would be futile.
As far as we are concerned, though, it is idle to speculate as to
what would happen to Michigan sports should the Big Ten leave the
national group. It's a prettygood bet that in the interest of self-
preservation the NCAA will either find a compromise acceptable to
the Big Ten, or if not will take no drartic action when the Western
Conference fails to abide by its TV rule
'WHIE IN NEW YORK Crisler has been conferring with Army's
Red Blaik concerning what could prove to be the game of the
year next fall: Army-Michigan. It appears that if left as originally
scheduled for Yankee Stadium it could conflict with the World Series
(it seems to be taken for granted anymore that at least one of the
parties to baseball's big blast will hang its spikes in New York). The
possibility of moving the game to Philadelphia was discussed, but
another conflict arises in connection with Pennsylvania's football
schedule. So don't be surprised if its announced shortly that the
Michigan Stadium will host seven games next fall.
Amid the wealth of other Michigan sports news it would be
easy to overlook the fact that a Michigan swimming team turned
in its first dual meet victory in 29 years under the guidance of any
other than Matt Mann. The two personable and optimistie young
men responsible for this year's swimmers are Gus Stager and
Bruce Harlan, the former being the gentleman who requested
(Jokingly?) that The Ensian devote two more pages to swimming
in order to amply cover Michigan's winning the NCAA title!
Michigan was even represented in Hawaii last week when All-
American Art Walker starred in the Hula Bowl (that was the game
where Lou Groza missed an extra point attempt while complaining
of "sea-sickness").

By STEVE HEILPERN
Coach Bill Perigo isn't getting
too optimistic over his surprising
Michigan basketball team's
chances for the rest of the sea-
son-yet.
While the Wolverine cagers
have a seven-three overall record
and have won two of three Con-
ference tilts, good for a quarter-
share of the Big Te lead, Perigo
is reminded of lat year's disas-
trous season.
"Don't forget that we were in
fine shape at this time last year,
In fact, we started the second se-
mester with an eight-five record
to our credit but then r'n into
trouble. We'll begin the toughest
part of our schedule in February,
and will the be abl to see how
good we are.
Improved Conditioning
This doesn't mean that Perigo
wasn't satisfied with Michigan's
victories over Ohio State and Wis-
consin. He noticed two big im-
provements in the squad. One is
the improved condition of his
players, save Jim Barron, who may
possibly be out for the remainder
of the season.
Seeing a lot of action at guard,
Tom Jorgenson has been getting
more mileage out of his bad thigh,
since he doesn't have to run quite
as much in the Michigan fast
break at this position.
Captain Paul Groffsky is round-
ing back into his 1954 form, as
was evidenced by his fine perform-
ance in Monday night's Wiscon-
sin game. Harvey Williams looks
more durable than he was last
year, and Don Eaddy is having his
finest campaign.
The other big improvement not-
ed by Perigo is Michigan's added
strength under the backboards.
Using Ron Kramer, Groffsky and
Williams up front simultaneously
for the first extensive period of
I-M Scores
BASKETBALL
Fraternity 'B'
Psi U 42, D.K.E. 5
Independents
Chemistry 47, Hawaiians 26
" Owen-Nakamura 36, Eaglehawk-
ers 33
M.C.F. 27, Cardinals 22
Evans 26, Cooley 19
Farouk's '5' 33, Mugwumps 20
Flying Tigers 54, Pill Pushers 13
Tansey Pansey 18, Turks 14
Newman defeated .oger Wil-
liams, default
PADDLEBALL
Fraternity
Chi Phi 3, Zeta Psi 0
Sigma Nu 2, Alpha Delta Phi 1
Pi Lambda Phi 3, Delta Sigma
Phi 0
A.S.P. 3, Phi Kappa Sigma 0
Beta Theta Pi 3, Alpha Phi Al-
pha 0
D.K.E. 2, Kappa Sigma 1
Theta Chi 3, Phi Kappa Psi
SPOUITS
BOB JONES
Night Editor

time, the Wolverines completely
dominated the 'oards'against the
Badgers. Perigo is seriously think-
ing of starting his three big men
in future games.
As for the Big Ten race, Perigo
sees a mad scramble, with four
teams possibly above the rest: Il-
linois, Minnesota, Iowa a n d
Northwestern. He adds, however,
that almost any Conference team,
including Michigan could beat the
form sheets.

LORNE HOWES
... a busy night

Red Wings Down Icers
As Freshmen Stand Out

By DAVE RORABACHER
In winning its first dual meet of
the 1955 season last Saturday, the
Michigan wrestling team proved
that its capturing of first place in
the Wilkes Invitational meet dur-
ing Christmas vacation was no
fluke.
The 28-7 victory over the Pur-
due Boilermakers pointed up the
team-wide strength possessed by
the Wolverine squad. The lone loss
came as Purdue's Ahmet Finol
pinned Paul Melgaard in the
heavyweight division. Finol, bet-
ter known as "the Turk," was last
year's Western Conference cham-
pion at 177 pounds while Mel-
gaard was wrestling his first
match in a college dual meet.
Wrestlers Praised
In reviewing the team's per-
formance in the meet, Assistant
Coach Bob Betzig pointed up the
work of Don Haney, Mike Rodri-
guez and Tom Krause as being es-
pecially praiseworthy. H a n e y ,
wrestling at 157, handled his op-
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ponent with comparative ease,
pinning him in the fast time of
two minutes and seven seconds.
Although injured in his first
match last season and consequent-
ly held out for the e-itire season,
Rodriguez looked like an experi-
enced performer as he was also
able to pin his mar in the 167
pound class. Krause, who was
wrestling the first match~ of his
life won a finehard-fought vic-
tory over the more experienced
Ron Larson by a 9-8 count..
Deppe Lauded
Also to be lauded is Dan Deppe
as he gained a fall over senior
Boilermaker Bob Algarian. Deppe
is another grappler who was com-
peting in his first dual meet. Cap-
tam Andy Kaul pinned his man in

fine style to maintain his unbeaten
record in college dual meet com-
petition.
Although Purdue is the reigning
Big Ten champion the Michigan
win is not quite so significant as
it might first appear. Purdue lost
many men from its last year's
team through graduation. Finol is
the sole remainder of the Boiler-
makers individual champions of
last year.
Michigan's next meet will be
against Indiana this Saturday.
The Hoosiers, who have won four
out of five matches, have three
men who are undefeated and pre-
sent a definite threat tr the Wol-
verines. The match will be held in
Yost Field House beginning at 8
p.m.

I

(Continued from Page 1)
Within two minutes, the Wings
opened their lead ur to 5-1, as
Howe netted his second of the
night, and rookie Lorne Dads beat
Howes a minute and a half later.
'M' Defense Strengthens
The second period -aw the Wol-
verine defense strengthen tremen-
dously ,as Schiller, Hudson, and
Bob Pitts rocked the Wings into
the boards on several occasions.
Almost 12 minutes of the period
had elapsed when Glen Skov add-
ed the sixth Detroit goal, and
Howes had held the Wing, score-
less for a consecutive period of
14% 2minutes.
The Wings kept playing hard
hitting, big-league caliber hockey,
and during the next two and a
half minutes increased their bulge
to 8-1 as Bill Dineen and Bob
Goldham hit the cords.
Bill Lucier, the only senior on
the Michigan squad, saw his first
action of the season in the third
period when he entered the Mich-
igan nets, and he proceeded to
hold the Wings to only two goals
while his teammates tallied a
brace of their own,
Rendall Scores
With Goalie Wilson smoking a
cigar, fleet Tommy Rendall picked
up a pass from Maxwell, and
slammed it home at 2:52 to close
the gap to 8-2, and the crowd went
wild.
Just 53 seconds later, the Hey-
ligermen surprisingly countered
again, as MacDonald moved in
from the left, took a neat pass
from Switzer and Dick Dunnigan,
and belted it into the nets.
Toward the close of the game,
the Wings let up somewhat, but
not before they scored another
pair ofgoals. Delvecchio and Din-
een became the only men to beat
HOCKEY STATISTICS
FIRST PERIOD: 1 - Detroit - Howe
(Wilson) 5:07; 2 - Detroit - Del-
vecchio (Howe, J. Wilson) 5:38; 3 -
Detroit - Pavelich (unassisted) 11:
06; 4 - Michigan - MacDonald
(Switzer) 12:44; 5 - Detroit - Howe
(J. Wilson) 15:42; 6 - Detroit - Da-
vis (Stasiuk, Kelly) 17:21.
Penalty: Detroit-Zeniuk (holding)
14:13.
SECOND PERIOD: 7 - Detroit - Skov
(Leswick, Pavelich) 11:52; 8 - De-
troit - Dineen (Bonin) 15:28; 9 -
Detroit - Godham (J. Wilson) 17:
47.
Penalty: Detroit-Pronovost (trip-
ping) 14:10.
THIRD PERIOD: 10 - Michigan -
Rendall (Maxwell) 2:52; 11 - Mich-
igan - MacDonald (Switzer, Dun-
nigan) 3:45; 12 - Detroit - Delvec-
chio (Pronovost) 10:37; 13 - De-
troit - Dineen (Reibel, Godham)
14:00. No Penalties.

Lucier,
a final

and brought the score to
10-3.

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As a final note may we humbly suggest that the powers-that-be
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