100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 17, 1954 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1954

TWO THE 1WICHTGAN DAILY

""""' '

Music Society To Feature
Stanley Quartet, Discussions

AFTER 14 MONTHS:
Patient Returns Home for Christmas

I

T ov*I fl~t

Concerts and discussions will
highlight the three-day confer-
ence of the American Musilogical
Society to be held in Ann Arbor
Dec. 27, 28 and 29.
Made up of music patrons, com-
posers and performers, the 1,000-
member society is "an extremely
important group," Prof. Louise
Cuyler of the School of Music
said, "because it is a scholarly
group, not an educational one."
"Most of the published works
in music research stem from So-
ciety members," Vrof. Cuyler not-
ed. Prof. Cuyler is the National
'Last' Court
Aids Justice
(Continued from Page 1)
liable source of income," he ex-
plained. "The Court cannot gear
itself to the economy of a maga-
zine."
Court Plans to Expand
The Court plans to expand its ac-
tivities so that there ,will be a
smaller Court of Las't Resort in
each state, with the original group
acting as a national supervising
agency.
The immediate aim of the Court,
Dr. Snyder said, is to "incorpor-
ate itself as a non-profit corpora-
tion. At the present, donations to
the Court are not tax-deductible.
But if it were a non-profit corpora-
tion, contributions to pay the
Court's expenses would be tax-de-
ductible."
In this way the Court could prob-
ably obtain enough funds to hire a
few full-time employes besides
meeting other investigation ex-
penses. Right now, work is done
on a voluntary, part-time basis by
men such as Dr. Snyder who have
their 'own businesses to concern
them besides.
Rosters of Lawyers
He reported that in some states
already there are rosters of law-
yers whohave banded together and
offered their services to the Court
on cases in their particular states.
Organized as a non-profit cor-
poration and receiviing assistance
from various state groups, the
Court would be able to handle
many more of the thousands of
cases that the mailman brings ev-
ery day, Dr. Snyder explained.
. Many of the cases never investi-
gated because there "just isn't
time" but which represented valid
cases of injustice could be given
proper attention. Dr. Snyder es-
timated that in Michigan alone, one
convicted first-degree murderer is
released every year.
He wonders how many innocent
prisoners are never released.

Program Chairman for the con-
ference.
Various Activities
During the three-day session,
various activities will take place.
The Clements Library and Stell-
field Collections will be open to
Society delegates. Prof. Percival
Price of the School of Music will
play a carillon recital on the
Baird Carillon in Burton Tower.
His program- will include works of
the 18th century from the Low
Countries.
Three special meetings will have
as their topics "Contemporary
Music," Ph.D. papers, and in the
closing session, Nino Pirrotta, a
visiting professor at Princeton
University will lecture.
Highlighting the conference will
be a Stanley Quartet recital, a
concert by the Cornell University
Choir and a speech by Fred D.
Wieck.
A commissioned work by Darius
Milhaud will be performed by the
Stanley Quartet, followed by a
piece by Prof. Ross Lee Finney of
the music school and Beethoven's
"Great Fugue."
Cornell Choir
Cornell's 53-member A Cappella
Choir will perform a Vaughan
Williams selection and the world
premiere of the Victoria Requiem.
Written in 1611, the Requiem was
recently discovered.
Fred D. Wieck, director of the
University of Michigan Press, will
speak on "Music in Press."
The Midwestern Chapter, to
which the School of Music be-
longs, is "one of the most active
chapters," Prof. Cuyler said. "We
hold both fall and spring meetings
and have 25-30 members here in
town, including faculty members
from the music school."
Presiding over the conference
will be Society president Prof.
Donald Grout of Cornell Univer-
sity and author of "A Short His-
tory of Opera."
Part of the meeting will be de-
voted to the electing of a new
president, vice-president, secre-
tary and member-at-large.
Krekler Gives
$150 to Fund
A check for $150 was returned
to the University by West Ger-
man Ambassador Heinz Krekler,
who spoke recently at a political
science gathering.
Krekler asked that the money,
received for a lecture on "Ger-
many-A Partner in the Free
World," be credited to the ex-
change student fund between the
University and Germany's Uni-
versity of Free Berlin.

Courtesy-University Hospital
BUCKY ZEMKO, plucky 11 year old polio patient, is due to be
released from University Hospital today after 14 months in
hospitals.
ADMINISTRATION CENTER:
Philippine Government
.Benefited byInstitute

By ALICE BASFORD
After fourteen months in hos-
pitals, Bucky Zemko, 11 year old
patient at University Hospital, is
expecting an extra special Christ-
mas present-he's going home to-
day.
Bucky, from Youngstown, Ohio,
was stricken with acute bulbar and
spinal polio a year ago last fall.
He was almost completely par-
lyzed and spent time in an iron
lung.
Three times his condition was
critical and there was serious
doubt whether he would live.
Although he rallied from these
sieges, Bucky failed to make much'
progress and was transferred to
University Hospital last May.
Mother Visits Daily
Since the plucky youngster ar-
rived, -his mother, Mrs. Charles
Zemko, has-been staying with
friends in Ann Arbor. She visits
him daily to help keep his mo-
rale high, encourage him in his
fight against polio and help with
his schooling.
Mrs. Zemko also acts as media-
tor for arguments arising among
the youngerboys in the ward.
At University Hospital, Bucky
has made spectacular progress.
Mrs. Zemko said, "They did won-
ders with him here." He can now
walk with crutches, is learning
to climb stairs and is allowed to
sit up about six hours a day.
Bucky's father drives 235 miles
from Youngstown every weekend
to see him. The family goes out
for Sunday dinner together.
An enthuiastic sports fan, Bucky
edited the sport column for "Pent-
house Press;" weekly Hospital
newspaper.
Interviews Tony Branoff
He likes baseball and football
particularly and is proud of his
interview with halfback Tony
Branoff.
Reporter Bucky gets his news
from radio, the television set in
the ward and newspaper clippings
which his father mails him daily.
He remembers especially the
major league baseball game he
went to in Detroit last summer.
Bucky watched his favorite team,
the Cleveland Indians, beat the
Tigers 10-1 and got a chance to
meet many of the players. He has
fivehautographed balls from games
he has seen.
Attends Hospital School
Bucky takes fifth and sixth
grade subjects at the Hospital
school. He attends classes in ge-
ography, history, science, spelling,
arithmetic and occupational ther-
apy.
One of Bucky's favorite pastimes
is having water pistol fights
with other patients in the ward.
As soon as he gets home, Bucky
is looking forward to his favorite
dinner - chicken, french fries,
corn, salad, bread ... and coke.
Year of 1954
Reviewed
(Continued from Pae 1)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 PM. doily.
1:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Class Register on North Uni-
versity or East University. Call NO
8-7651 immediately. )55A
LOST: Braided gold watch chain, South
University near Forest or Church. Re-
ward. NO 2-1365. )57A
LOST: Social Science 154 Notebook.
Urgently needed. Ken Stoumen, NO
2-3191. )58A
LOST-Blue Ronson lighter with gold
fleurdelis. Initials N.E.B. Finder call
NO 3-1531, Ext. 105. )59A

v

U

FOR SALE
1950 PLYMOUTH, four door, radio
heater, snow tires, very clean. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. 193B
1949 CHEVROLET, choice of two. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port, Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )192B
1948 KAISER, four door, heater, good
rubber. The big lot across from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)191B
1930 MODEL T FORD, four door, new
rubber, runs perfect. The big lot
across from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )190B

I

By MARY ANN THOMAS
Formed at a time when the Com-
munist menace made it impossible
to leave Manila at night, the In-
stitute of Public Administration in
the Philippines has developed into
the leading center for administra-
tive training in the Far East.
"Immediate, intangible benefits
of the Institute are difficult to point
out," Theodore H. Drews of the
University's public administration
institute observed, "but anyone
who has visited the Institute is
convinced the Philippine govern-
ment is being tremendously bene-
fitted by it."
"When we first arrived in Ma-
nila to start the Institute in Au-
gust of 1952," the Institute's train-
ing coordinator said, "the Huks had
almost captured the city."
Reduced Communist Influence
However, he continued, "with the
possessive undertones of an artist
proud of his creation, the Institute
has reduced Communist influence
in this respect. "It has produced a
professional feeling among govern-
ment administrators and a pride in
their position which in turn has
resulted in better government."
"Philippine government was all
but destroyed in the past war,"
Drew explained. "America's For-
eign Operations Administration or-
ganized the Institute with the Phil-
ippines and the University as tech-
nical advisor to bring the island
government up to standard."
According to the fifth semi-an-
nual report issued by the Institute,
interest in public administration is
rising in the Philippines and in
Southeast Asia generally.
In its short history about 2,000
government employes have been
trained in the in-service training
program and 500 students have
studied in the academic program.
In addition, the Institute provides
scholarships for qualified Southeast
Asian students.
'U' Library Aid
With the aid of the University's
Main Library, the Institute has es-
tablished what Drews calls the
"finest library on public admin-
MARCH OF DIMES

1e rua a'aduated
BE A UNITED AIR LINES
STEWARDESS
Now interviewingtfor early spring classes.
Successful applicants will be trained at our
Cheyenne, Wyo. training school.
QUALIFICATIONS:
Age-21 to 27. Height-5' 2" to 5' 7"
20/40 vision each eye uncorrected. Must
have well rounded educational and/or busi-
ness background and pass rigid physical.
Class commitments now being made.
Apply: D. H. Robinson, Dist. Personnel Mgr.
5959 So. Cicero Ave., Chicago 38, Illinois

istration in the Far East." Michi-
gan selects, orders and catalogs all
material for the Institute.
For technical assistance the Uni-
versity loans professors from Mich-
igan and other colleges to the IPA
and coordinates all accounting and
administration of the project from
here, Drews said.
Four American professors remain
on the technical staff at present
but will gradually be replaced by
Filipino personnel. When the con-
tract with the University expires in
1956 the Institute will be complete-
ly turned over to Filippine educa-
tors.
Prof. Daniel S. McHargue of the
political science department is act-
ing as liaison officer between the
Institute and the University and
FOA and is teaching courses in
public administration.
Velmonte Now Dictator
Prof. Ferrel Heady of the politi-
cal science department directed
the second year of the Institute and
was replaced this year by Dean
Jose E. Velmonte of the Philippine
University's College of Business Ad.
ministration.
Six Filippinos are presentlybeing
trained in various American uni-
versities to join the teachingstaff
upon their return to the Institute
next year. Two, Jose Soberano and
Ramon Garcia, are studying at the
University.
Although the Institute has re-
ceived wide popular and govern-
mental support, Drewsnobserved
that American staff members faced
several problems upon their arri-
val.
"Americanism or westernization
of the Philippines is just a thin
veneer over a Malayan culture
moderated by the Spanish," he
commented. "We didn't try to make
them accept our way but to adapt
our way to theirs," lIe explained.
Advisers Warmly Received
"Although at first it was quite
difficult to learn how to adapt our-
selves to Filippine thinking, we hac
to learnthe methods best fo
them," Drews said, adding, "I
think we were successful."
Another problem, Drews contin-
ued witha chuckle, was that Amer.
ican technical advisors were to
warmly received. "We didn't un-
derstand the limitations of our ad-
vice," he explained.
When asked for advice Ameri-
cans would generally give only off-
hand comments, but the Philippine
officials often issued orders foi
their departments to follow it to
the letter, he added.
With more people wanting to at-
tend than the Institute can accom-
modate, a third problem of finan-
cial support for expansion arises.
Drews, however, believes that
President Magsaysay and the
United States are fully behind the
Institute and will allocate increasec
funds for its support and expan-
sion.

DO YOU HAVE MY COAT? Man driv-
ing car with Wisconsin license who
picked up students thumbing to To-.
ledo Nov. 19 would like to recover
Tan Tweed Kuppenheimer Coat taken
by mistake. Call NO 8-8887 or leave
coat at 1209 S. University. )60A
LOST: Public School Grade Book, red
with "W.M.H.S." "Bloom" on cover.
Campus or State Street area. Urg-
ently needed. Reward.Call NO 2-5881.
)60A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B.
1950 FORD, two door, one owner, low
mileage, good tires, radio, heater. Only
$475. NO 2-7884. )166B
CHRISTMAS TREES-$1.00 up. Drive
in Pontiac Road at R.R. track, one
block west of Broadway signal light.
We don't want all the business, just
yours. )20L
1938 PLYMOUTH, runs good, $65.
1948 PLYMOUTH SEDAN, $245.
Fitzgerald-Jordan. Inc.
607 Detroit Phone NO 8-8144
)183B
1953 FORD V-8 VICTORIA HARDTOP
$1395
Two-tone flamingo and ivory
Matching vinyl upholstery
White-sidewa iitires
Chromium wheel covers.
Automatic transmission
Fresh-air heating system
Windshield washers
Push-button radio
A one-owner car. Will arrange terms.
For a demonstration drive, call
NO 3-3233. )187B
1938 CHEVROLET, beautiful shape,
private sale by elderly lady. NO 3-3267.
Call after 6 p.m. ) 185B
1948 DODGE, four door, radio, heater,
one owner. The big lot across from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)19413
WUERTH
Starting FRIDAY
M-G-M's Story of the Secret Three...
One is a traitor and two are Betrayed t

NEVER USED-$ 140 1954 Zenith Trans-
oceanic portable for $89., NO 3-2569.
)156B
LEICA IIIC, F 3.5 Elmar, new case.
Best offer, NO 3-5862.
TAPE RECORDER T.D.C. Columbia,
new $189.95; Webster-Chicago Wire
Recorder $69.95, no down payment.
Hudson Electronic, 200 N. 4th, NO
8-6822. Tape Recorder Sales and Ser-
vices. )196B
FOR RENT
FURNISHED - Two bedroom campus
apartment. Available Dec. 15 for 3-4
adults. Private bath. $140. NO 3-8454.
)170
ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH - Campus
Tourist Home, 518 E. William (near
State). NO 3-8454. )23D
ROOMS FOR RENT-Male student,
double rooms and suite, cooking
privileges. Half a block from Cam-
pus, 417 E. Liberty. )27D
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED to NYC via Penn.
Turnpike. Leave Friday afternoon.
Call Don, NO 8-8993 after 11:00' a.m.
)39G
,Buy Christmas Seals

TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED to Oklahoma City
or St. Louis, Tulsa, etc. Leave Sat.,
Dec. 18, return Jan. 1. NO 3-1511,
ext. 2780. After 6 p.m. NO 3-3192. )40G
PERSONAL
YES-
we'll handle all your last second
gifts. Student Periodical, NO 2-3081,
days, eves. (pay afterdChristmas) )51F
HELP WANTED
DRAFTSMAN WANTED for consulting
engineering office. Part time or full
time. Familiarity with piping and
chemical machinery desirable but not
necessary. No Saturday work. Box 3.
)23H
BUSINESS SERVICES
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)101
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Wool
soxs washed also. )8I
WEBCOR
3 Speaker Musicale
The first truly hi-fidelity table model
phonograph. Hear it and
compare it at
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.Q.
"Student Service"
Hallicrafters Radios and Television
1217 So. University Ph. NO 8-7942
Il blocke east of East Eng. )47
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALITY
NO 2-7787
for 2x3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-27$1
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20

U 4

Wishing You All a
Merry Christmas
and
Happy Holidays

I

Movie Calendar for Those Who Remain

I

I

#.

If

1

:.

(
4
II
I
4

I

U

-.

'I
I
1.

GL-1784-2 cols. x 84 lines

On Nov. 2, the voters-in rec-
ord numbers for an off-year elec-
tion-went to the polls, and voted
in Democratic majorities in both
the House and Senate.
Guatemala Revolt
United States moved swiftly in
May to support an anti-Commu-
nist revolt in Guatemala on the
basis of a possible Red threat to
the Panama Canal.
A war of short duration broke
out June 17, and 12 days later
most of the fighting stopped, with
Col. Carlos Castillo Armas at the
head of a ruling military junta.
The revolution was marked by
scattered and sparodic clashes and
conflicting claims from both sides.
Suprred on by President Eisen-
hower's statement that the St.
Lawrence Seaway was a "must"
for national defense as well as for
economic reasons, Congress put
their stamp of approval on the
project this year.
The President's signature of the
bill in May marked the end. of
more than a half century of con-
troversy over the Seaway.
More than 600,000 first, second
and third graders throughout the
nation held out their arms this
spring to receive an injection of
Salk antipolio vaccine.
Whether or not this vaccine
may mean an end to the suffer-
ing of polio is being determined
at the University by a staff of ap-
proximately 100 clerks, coding ex-
perts, statisticians and IBM op-
erators working 24 hours a day in
the University Special Projects
Bldg.
r11

AlsO
Gunsmoke!! Terror!
JEANNE r .
DALE
'ROBERTSON

18-21 ALAN LADD in
"THE BLACK KNIGHT"
22-24 "Gambler From Natchez"
25-31 "DEEP IN MY HEART"
1-7 "THREE RING CIRCUS"

CLARK GABLE
LANA TURNER
TVICTOR o
M./ATU'jRE CAIHERlN

18-21
22-24
25131
1-7

I

"HANSEL & GRETEL"
"BENGAL BRIGADE"
"SIGN OF THE PAGAN"
CinemaScope
MIDNIGHT SHOW
NEW YEAR'S EVE
"THREE FOR
THE SHOW"
in CinemaScope
"THE VIOLENT MEN"
CinemaScope

1

4-

.._...r".Apw Im

i

I

3

m

4lvmu, m ' I i6 N AA 4 wP

Com#' ga-"o Mudr
Coming.---"Dial 'M' for Murder"

"4

i

6

BYGREHOUID, ::D.
GrĀ« ater ONE-WAY
aFARES
Extra Round-Trip .
Reductions for
GROUPS \
of3ormre + p
Now lower-than--ever
Famly Fares on round
trips. Go Monday,

JANUARY 3-31

"Bowl the
Automatic
Way
with A
Automal

THIS WEEKEND
VIM the
* ...

l

OF
tic

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan