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November 24, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1954

'U' Music School Grad,
Wins National Award

.l

National Music Sorority, Sigma
Alpha Iota, has presented its Na-
tional College Achievement Award
for 1953-54 to Mary Catherine
Hutchins Coffey, 1953 graduate of
the University's School of Music.
This award is presented each
year to one coed, selected from the
entire national membership, on the
basis of superiority in scholarship,
personality, student activities, sor-
ority service, musical ability, and
recommendations made by the
chapters choosing her for the Prov-
ince Award.
Mrs. Coffey, who received this
; honor yesterday with a formal pre-
sentation by Mrs. Gertrude Wood,
national treasurer, at a musicale
in the League, has a long record
of honors, achievements and serv-
ice.
At commencement, she received
the highest honor bestowed by the
School of Music, and one not given
every year, the Stanley Medal. She
is a member of Phi Beta Kappa,
Mortar Board, Pi Kappa Lambda,
Phi Kappa Phi, Senior Society, Al-
pha Lambda Delta and Wyvern.
Vice-president of the Alpha chap-
ter of SAI, Mrs. Coffey was award-
ed the SAI Sword of Honor last
spring. She was also active in Mich-
igan Singers, Bach Choir, Gilbert
JGP
There will be a meeting of
the central committee of JGP
at 8:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 29
to decide on the name for the
1955 production. Room number
will be posted in the League
lobby.

Couzens Hall
Team Wins'
WAA Honors
A Chi 0's To Challenge
'A' Tourney Champions
In Volleyball Playoffs
No matter who wins the WAA-
sponsored volleyball tournament,
it will be Couzens Hall.
This rather ambigious situation
has come about because two teams
from Couzens are competing for
first place in A tourney finals.
Seeing action in the A semifi-
nals were Chi Omega vs. Couzens
I and Mosher II vs. Couzens II.
The latter was a very close game,
with Couzens II edging out a 22 to
21 victory.
After a somewhat slow start,
the tournament got into full swing.
Teams losing their first game went
into the B tourney, while the win-
ners entered the A tournament. A
loss in the second round of games
put a team out of the competition.
Forty-seven teams entered the
annual t o u r n e y, representing

First Hand Report of Skirmish Given

THE MICHIGAN DAILYPAGEV
African Mau Mau Raid Pictured

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
MARY H. COFFEY

and Sullivan Society and the Opera
Department of the music school.
Her services include being presi-
dent of Westminster Guild, mem-
ber of the Chaplain's Staff at Uni-
versity Hospital, Student Religious
Association Council and World Uni-
versity Service.
This is the first time that this
honor was given to a chapter at the
University.
Preceding the presentation was a
coffee hour given by the Ann Arbor
patronesses and alumnae group,
and the Alpha chapter.
The musical program included pi-
ano solos by Barbara Gotz and Sal-
ly Lutz, and a viola, cello and
flute trio with Jean Horten, Char-
lotte Lewis and Helen Snyder.

r' L a s t D a y
30 of the best albums to select from, including
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CALIFORNIA ARTISTS
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312 South. State

Couzens 2 beat Couzens 1
in last night's volleyball game,
24-20. Alpha Chi Omega, B
tourney champions, have chal-
lenged Couzens 1.
league houses, sororities and dor-
mitories. Some housing groups had
two or more teams.
Those participating in the B
semi-finals included Alpha Chi
Omega vs. Victor Vaughan and
Delta Gamma vs. Yost House.
The B tourney finals were very
close, but a strong Alpha Chi Ome-
ga team defeated Yost House with
a 22 to 19 score.
The end of the tournament is
not yet in sight, however, because
B tourney champions have already
asked for a challenge match with
the runners-up of the A tourney.
Holiday Breakfast
Planned By SRA
Students remaining in Ann Arbor
for the Thanksgiving week-end
have been invited to attend a
Thanksgiving breakfast sponsored
by SRA at Lane Hall at 9 a.m.
Thursday.
Reservations for the breakfast
which is open to all students may
be placed with Doris Harpole at
Lane Hall before 4 p.m. today.
For those students wishing to
make use of study facilities during
the weekend, the general library
will be open from 8 a.m. through 6
p.m. tomorrow and Friday.
The library will be closed Thurs-
day, Saturday and Sunday.
Divisional libraries will be open
during their regularly scheduled
hours Friday.

WITH THE FATHER ALREADY IN CUSTODY, THIS KIKUYU
FAMILY WATCHES THE STRIKING FORCE RAIDERS DEPART

By SID KLAUS
Special to The Daily
NAIROBI, Kenya-Two or three
times daily a string of trucks
loaded with troops rumbles out
from behind the barbed-wire gates
of a tent encampment not far
from the New Stanley Hotel in
downtown Nairobi, to hunt Mau-
mau in this modern, nervous East
African capital.
In the past six months these
raids, conducted by the Striking
Force of the Kenya Police, have
become routine operations.
They consist of small-scale repe-
titions of Operation Anvil, the
huge Mau-mau clean up campaign
conducted last April by the Brit-
ish Army and the Kenya police.
A small section of the city is sur-
rounded by the troops, the houses
within the area are searched, and
all the inhabitants are screened.
Those without identification pap-
ers are carted off to a detention
camp.
Prisoners Interviewed
There a loyal Kikuyu tribe board
interviews the prisoners; the ones
said to be "hard-core" supporters
are interned at one of the four
huge guarded settlements outside
the city.
The raids seldom last more than
an hour, and are usually carried
out without violence.
The Striking Force, which heads
the mopping-up operations is re-
sponsible only to the top echelon
of the joint army-police command.
It is manned by hand-picked Af-
rican troops, representing every
Kenya tribe except Kikuyu, and
staffed by five British officers.
Police officials estimate that the
raids will be continued on a daily
basis for at least another six
months.
Mau-mau Support
Mau-mau has found its greatest
support among the more than one
million members of the Kikuyu
tribe of central Kenya. In an ef-
fort to halt the further spread of
terrorism, the British government

has resorted to a widespread use of
its police powers. Since the begin-
ning of the emergency, more than
30,000 Kikuyus, almost one-third
of Nairobi's African population,
have been arrested in the city, and
removed to the settlement camps.
A full-scale war, complete with
tanks and bombers, is still being
waged against an organized group
of Mau-maus north of Nairobi, but
within the capital itself, a shaky
calm prevails. The largest problem
now facing the city dwellers is the
winning over and re-education of
the Kikuyu youth.
Meanwhile the uneasy day to
day life of Nairobi continues. And
even though some local citizens
claim their city is now safer than
London, and though the variegat-
ed strollers along the Queen Eliz-
abeth Way no longer bother more
than a glance as the Striking
Force rolls by, milady's handbag
continues to appear suspiciously
heavy, and a black holster peek-
ing out from under a blue blazer
remains the accepted fashion.

DAILY
PHOTO-
F EATURE
STORY and PHOTOS
by SID KLAUS

THE AREA'S INHABITANTS ARE MADE TO SQUAT
AS OTHERS ARE ROUNDED UP.

STRIKING FORCE COMMANDER DERIC SEARLE LEADS HIS
MEN AFTER A FLEEING MAU MAU

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The soft, yet sturdy...
smooth, smooth shoes of
DOGEY leather.
A fashion highlight of the
Fall Season.

SUSPECT MAU MAUS ARE HELD FOR QUESTIONING

A THOROUGH SEARCH A LOYAL KIKUYU SHOWS INSPECTOR ROBERT FORBES
HIS IDENTIFICATION.

$10.95
and
$12.95
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~( 8a~, '~ ________________________ __________________________________________________

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