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November 24, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-7

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1954

HONORS HISTORIAN:
Prof. Hall Contributes
To Volume of Essays

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,127,235 U.S. RELIEF SHIPMENTS OF
FOOD SURPLUSES ABROAD
During 12 months ending June 30, 1954, value of surplus
food commodities distributed in distressed areas overseas
;;< by voluntary relief agencies totaled $44,642,28 3

By MEkLE MAYERSTEIN
Prof. John W. Hail of the Far
Eastern studies department recent-
ly contributed to a volume of origi-
nal historical essays in honor of
Prof. Laurence Bradford Packard,
chairman of the history department
at Amherst College.
Entitled "Teachers of History:
Essays in Honor of Laurence Brad-
ford Packard," the book was com-
piled by 15 of Dr. Packard's for-
mer students, and edited by Prof.
H. Stuart Hughes of Stanford Uni-
versity. It was presented to him in
a ceremony marking his forthcom-
ing retirement in June.
Ability To Teach
"Prof. Packard is quite well
known, especially for his ability to
teach," commented Prof. Hall. "He
has stimulated a lot of people,
which is why a group of his stu-
dents got together to write this
book."
Prof. Hall's essay, "Historiog-
raphy in Japan," describes Japan-
ese history as it is written by the
Japanese themselves. The essay

is based on work that he did in
Japan two years ago when he was
director of the University's field
station in Okayama City, Japan.
Prof. Hall is now acting director
of the Center for Japanese Stud-
ies. He teaches Far Eastern his-
tory, specializing in Japanese his-
tory.
Representative in Japan
After his graduation from Am-
herst as one of Prof. Packard's
students, Prof. Hall served as the
college's representative at Dosh-
isha University in Japan until 1941.
From 1941-46 he was a lieuten-
ant-commander in the United
States Naval Reserve, and in 1946-
47 he held a Rockefeller post-war
fellowship, coming to the Univer-
sity in 1948. In 1950 he received his
doctorate from Harvard.
Besides teaching, Prof. Hall has
authored many books on Japanese
history. His most recent book,
"Tanuma Okitsugu, Forerunner of
Modern Japan," will be published
in the spring of 1955.

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A SPECIAL THANKSGIVING appeal is being made in Protestant Churches this week for a "Share
our'Surplus" program. Rev. R. Norris Wilson, executive director of Church World Service, noted
that the motive of the program is to share the fruits of labor with neighbors of different traditions and
belief, in a search for peace and mutual prosperity. The program aims at collecting more than one
million dollars to finance distribution of surplus food being made available free of charge by the
United States Government. The Thanksgiving appeal this year is the first in a drive expected to last
at least three years.

Discrimination Clauses Gone
From Sorority Constitutions

By JANE HOWARD,
Discrimination, on the surface,
appears to be a bygone facet of
campus sorority life.
None of the 18 sorority presi-
dents and officers contacted in a
recent poll said their houses had
any kind of bias or discriminatory
clauses anywhere in their consti-
tutions or rituals.
Three presidents, however - of
Alpha Xi Delta, Chi Omega and
Kappa Delta-would not answer
questions on discrimination, claim-
ing they could not reveal sorority
information to non-members. A
sorority's constitution and ritual,
they concurred, is a matter sacred
to the individual house.
Contradicts 1951 Statement
Otherwise, results of the survey
directly contradicted a statement
made in November, 1951, by the
Panhellenic Association president,
that bias clauses were then present
in some sorority constitutions.
A Student Legislature member
in 1951 brought the sorority bias
question to a peak with his claim
of "definite proof" of discrimina-
tion. An investigation of the mat-
ter, leading to the Panhel presi-
dent's admission, was carried on
by SL's Human and International
Relations Committee.
Files Show No Bias Clauses
No further mention was made
that year of the particular sorori-
ties in which discrimination exist-
ed.
Whether the three sororities
whose presidents would not com-
ment do have discriminatory
clauses is not certain. Panhel
President Jean Bromfield, '55, re-
ported a careful inspection of Pan-

hellenic files showed no record of
any such clauses.
Rushees this fall were told that
no discrimination existed-on basis
of Panhel file information. When
rumors circulated that a particular
sorority house practiced discrimi-
nation of any sort, Panhel posted
answers to them on its "rumor
board."
Miss Bromfield added that it is
Panhellenic's policy to oppose any
discrimination on bias clauses.
Dean of Women Deborah Bacon,
when questioned, put it, "a change
on a piece of paper doesn't mean
a change will automatically follow
in the hearts of men."~
Most sorority members agreed.
One junior affiliate explained, "it's
every group's right to choose its
own members, and no provision in
a constitution is going to stop a
sorority from pledging somebody
it really wants, or from excluding
anyone it doesn't.
Some sorority members said
their failure to take in minority
group members resulted not from
bias clauses but from "pressure
from the alumnae."
In general, however, affiliates
claimed they're satisfied with ex-
isting processes of selecting new
members.

SAC Adopts
'Participation'
Unanimously
(Continued from Page 1)
The action was based on an SL
recommendation passed at their
Oct. 27 meeting.
Under the new ruling a group
may apply for SAC recognition
with only 20 members instead of
the previously required 30. All oth-
er requirements for recognition re-
main in effefct.
Recognizes Common Sense Party
SAC also approved the activities
calendar for the spring semester
and granted recognition to the new-
ly formed Common Sense Party.
eDnying a request for recogni-
tion by Taumen, newly formed so-
cial club which hopes eventually,
to affiliate with Tau Epsilon fra-
ternity, SAC indicated that it would
be glad to reconsider the request
at a subsequent date. Reconsidera-
tion will be subject to receipt of
the stated opinion of the Interfra-
ternity Council, the endorsement
of the Tau Epsilon Phi national of-
fice and other pertinent informa-
tion.
SAC extended recognition to the
newly formed European Club or-
ganized by European students to
discuss and stimulate interest in
European culture.

Prof. Super
Writes Life
Of Landor
Prof. Robert H. Super of the Eng-
lish department has written what
is called lthe first comprehensive
biography" of England's Walter
Savage Landor.
The non-fiction work will be pub-
lished by the New York University
Press Tuesday. Prof. Super is in
Europe this semester on a sabbat-
ical leave.
Works For 15 Years
Working on the project for 15
years, he had gained access to
Landor collections in England It-
aly, Scotland, Wales and America,
to gain much material previously
unknown or unavailable.
The biography is also a mirror
of English literary life in the first
half of the 19th Century as atten-
tion is given not only to criticisms
of Landor's verse and prose but to
his relationships with his contem-
poraries.
Articles on Poets
Prof. Super has also written ar-
ticles on other poets of the same
century, including Browning and
Arnold.
He holds baccalaureate degrees
from both Oxford and Princeton
Universities and a doctorate from
the latter. He joined the faculty
here in 1947 after teaching at
Princeton and Michigan State Nor-
mal College.
Last summer he was the Freder-
ick Ives Carpenter Visiting Profes-
sor of English at the University of
Chicago.
.messiah' Tickets
Handel's "Messiah" will be pre-
sented on Dec. 4 and 5 in Hill Audi-
torium, with four soloists and the
University Musical Society Choral
Union and Orchestra, conducted by
Lester McCoy.
Alise Lungerhausen, D e t r o i t
harpischordist will also appear.
Luncine Amara, Lillian Crookasi-
an, Donald Gramm and Charles
Curtis will be soloists.
Tickets for both performances,
priced at 50 and 75 cents are on
sale at the office of the University
Musical Society in Burton Tower.

1% 215 East Liberty
NO 3-1319
OPEN MONDAY AND FRIDAY

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JEWELRY - CERAMICS - TRICKS
GREETING CARDS - MINIATURES - TOYS
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Vanf DyKe's

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SAFEGUARD YOUR MONEY
Carry your cash by means 'of
T1 RAVELER1 &Sl CH EQUES
" CONVENIENT
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Inquire NOW at
THE ANN ARBOR BANK
Main and Huron Streets
State Street at Nickels Arcade
1108 South University
Packard at Brockman
WHITMORE LAKE, MICHIGAN

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DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER

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'THE MOON IN THE YELLLOW RIVER'

by DENIS JOHNSTON
2 5 Thursday, Dec. 2

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IOTTLED UNDER AVTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY &Y
ANN ARBOR COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
331 S. Ashley St. -- Ann Arbor, Michigan
"CoterI s registered trade-mark. @ 1953, The Coca-Cola Comrony

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Thursday, Nov.2
Friday, Nov. 26
Saturday, Nov. 2
Sunday, Nov. 28

7

CURTAIN
8:15 P.M.

Friday, Dec. 3
Saturday, Dec. 4
Sunday, Dec. 5

GENERAL ADMISSION $1.65

Please Make Advance Reservations
Phone Box Office NO 2-5915

Masonic Temple
327 S. Fourth Ave.

f

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Choice of'
Celery and Olives Cranberry Sauce
French Onion Soup
ROAST NATIVE TURKEY
Gravy Corn Bread Stuffing
Buttered Onions Broccoli Asparagus
d Potato Cranberry Sauce Grape Jam

10I

Giblet(
Squash B
Mashed and Baked

Engineering
representatives of
PRATT &. WHITNEY
?* c
A RCRAFT
will be on the campus
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29
f In r x IO
to interview'
AERONAUTICAL METALLURGICAL ?
ELECTRICAL MECHANICAL
PHYSICS

{

Fresh Garden Cider
Rolls
- Apple Pie Pumpkin Pie M
Vermont Cheddar Cheese

ince Pie

Coffee
$2.75
CHILDREN'S PORTIONS $1.75

Milk

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