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November 24, 1954 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-24

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MMEMENR

WEDNJSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE HE

Meads To Captain ichigan Football Tean

'in

'55

V

leers MacFarland, Rendall Switch Lines
As Wolverine Hockey Season Draws Near

'Number 76' Is Key Figure in 'M' Line;
Baer Honored as 'Most Valuable Player'

r:

. By PHIL DOUGLIS
Michigan hockey coach Vic Hey-
liger made another move yesterday
to strengthen his latest Wolverine
ice squad by combining youth with
experience.
Heyliger moved veteran captain
Bill MacFarland into the center
slot of his rookie line, between
wingers Gerry Karpinka a n d
George Dunningan, and at the
same time inserted rookie center
Tommy Rendall between veterans
Neil Buchanan and Jay Goold in
his other line.
The move came as Michigan's
icers looked forward to itsglast
weekend of rest, for the rugged 23
game schedule gets under way a
week from Friday, as McGill Uni-
versity invades the Coliseum for a
two game exhibition series.
No Quantity, Much Quality
Heyliger is both optimistic and
pessimistic about the coming sea-
son. "What we lack in quantity, we
sure have in quality" said the gen-
ial coach. This fact is borne out by
the presence of only 11 men on the
varsity squad, now that winger
Yves Herbert is out of the lineup,
at least for awhile.
Hebert suffered a concussion last
week in practice, and is still in
University Hospital. This leaves
Michigan with only six forwards,
three defensemen and two goalies
-period. Heyliger is dreading us-
ing such a thin team in the rarified
atmosphere of Colorado, where the
Wolverines open the Western Hock-
ey League season over Christmas
Vacation.
On the other hand, two things
seem to be in favor of the Wolver-
ines, who will be bidding for their
eighth successive trip to the NCAA
playoffs in Colorado Springs next
March.
Keep Your Eye on These
The first factor is quality. Heylig-
er has some of the finest players
- in years on his squad. MaeFar-
land is a cinch for All-American
honors if he repeats his spectacu-1

,

lar performance of last season.
Rookie goalie Lorne Howes is
called by many observers the fin-
est goaltending prospect in colle-
giate hockey today.hRookie center
Tommy Rendall has especially
pleased Heyliger-for he has shown
magnificent speed, stickhandling,
playmaking, and shooting during
the pre-season drills.
Another element which will work
to Michigan's advantage is addi-
tional help which will arrive at
mid-semester. At this time, Bu-
chanan's twin brother, Mike, be-
comes eligible, and this huge
blonde speedster will add much
needed depth and luster to the
Maize and Blue attack. Also a dis-
tinct possibility is that Telly Mas-
carin, now ineligible for scholas-
tic reasons, will be able to play
There will be a 'M' Club
meeting next Tuesday, Nov. 30,
at 7:30 p.m. in Yost Field
House. Annual picture will be
taken so please bring 'M' sweat-
ers.
--Andy Kaul
come next February, when Michi-
gan heads into the stretch run.
These two men, along with a heal-
thy Hebert, could give Michigan
three solid lines, and could make
the Wolverines a definite contend-
er.
Heyliger pointed out even an-
other factor which may make
Michigan's task a bit easier, the
better balance in the Western
Hockey League. For the first time
in years, every team in the league
is very strong-strong enough to

gain a playoff berth by finishing
first or second.
Gophers Growl
Up at Minneapolis, John Mariuc-
ci's Gophers are on the warpath
again . . . with John Mayasich,
Ken Yackel, and John Mattson
heading the returnees. Over at
Grand Forks, the Nodaks of North
Dakota are beating the war-drums,
as Spike Shultz and Ben Cherski
add veteran strength to "Fido"
Purpurs' dangerous squad. In
Houghton, Michigan, M i c h i g a n
Tech's Huskies have a "real ball
club" for the first time in years,
according to Heyliger.
Michigan State, with Weldy Ol-
sen, John Mayes, Ed Schiller and
other stars returning, will be bet-
ter than last year, when they gave
the Wolverines fits. Heyliger also
points a wary finger at the Colo-
rado teams. Both Denver and Col-
orado College have tough and vet-
eran teams-good enough to take
all the bunting.
How then, can Michigan expect
to benefit from all this competi-
tion? Heyliger points out, that this
year as never before, these other
teams will be "cutting their own
throats" in a "dog-eat-dog" race,
and no team will get 'fat" at the
cost of the league's weak sisters.
Michigan, while losing its share,
may not lose any more than most
other teams, and thus be in thick
of the race all the way.
This is the way the race shapes
up to Heyliger, who has led Michi-
gan hockey teams to the most'
glorious era in its history. Can he
do it again? We can only wait and
see.

By DAVE GREY
G. Edgar Meads, this year's
starting right guard, is the new
captain-elect of the 1955 Michigan
football team.
In a squad meeting held yester-
day afternoon, the Oxford, Michi-
gan, junior was selected by his
teammates to succeed this/!year's
captain, Ted Cachey; and, in the
words of Coach Bennie Ooster-
baan, "to follow in the line of all
great Michigan leaders."
Fred Baer was selected as the
"most valuable player."
Oosterbaan commented on
Meads by saying, "Besides being
an excellent player, he is also a
fine leader and a fine citizen."
Meads has performed consistently'
all season and ranks as one of the
most improved ballplayers on the
team.
Originally a tackle in his sopho-
more year, Meads was shifted this
fall to the guard position by Line
Coach Jack Blott, and has started
ever since.
Tipping the scales at 200 pounds,
the 6-foot, 20-year old lineman's

full name is actually George Edgar
Meads, but he retains only the ini-
tial of his first name. To Michigan
football fans, however, he's recog-
nized as "number 76."
As a letterwinner on the 1953.
Varsity, Meads saw limited action
at the tackle slot, playing 26 min-

ness in recovering a Northwestern
fumble 'to set-up the only score of
the game played at Evanston on
October 16.
After Northwestern had started
to move at the end of the first half
only to be stopped by the Wolver-
ine defense, Meads brought the
big break of the game by pouncing
on a Northwestern fumble on the
second play of the second quarter.
Michigan took over the ball on the
Wildcat 24-yard line, and eight
plays later, Danny Cline scored,
Kramer added the extra point and
Michigan had a 7-0 margin that
was to be the final score.
The other award was -bestowed
upon senior fullback Fred Baer,
who was selected as the "most
valuable player."
Forced to take a back seat to
Dick Balzhiser and Bob Hurley
last season, Baer finally had a
chance to come into his own this
year. The 5-foot 11-inch, blond sen-
ior became a key man in the Maize
and Blue offense by picking up the
needed short yardage all season
long. Baer was particularly out-
standing in the 14-13 upset of Iowa.
During the season, Baer aver-
aged about four yards per carry,
gaining 372 net yards rushing in
seven Big Ten games to rank
sixth in the conference.
A final announcement named Cap
Grathwohl, '56, as next year's sen-
ior manager.

VIC'HEYLIGER
... twelve men and a prayer

Varsity Cagers Smash
Freshman Team, 92-49

By JACK HORWITZ
Michigan's varsity basketball
squad romped over a defenseless
freshman team, 92-49, before ap-
proximately three hundred fans in
Yost Field House last night.
Coach Bill Perigo, starting the
same lineup that he used most of
last season, was pleased by the
fine work of sophomore Jim Shear-
on, who came into the game mid-
way in the first half and immedi-
ately took the spotlight.
Shearon, sharing the guard du
ties with Don Eaddy and Jim Bar-

I-M Scores

MICHIGAN FOURTEENTH:
OSU Ranked Tops in Nation by AP

ron, missed only one shot as he
tallied 12 points. His defensive
work was excellent, according to
Perigo, and he showed a lot of
drive.
Barron, the game leading scorer
with 25 points, also displayed much
of the defensive work he showed
Wolverine cage fans last season.
After the Varsity cagers opened
up a 12 point lead, Perigo sent
Shearon and Ron Kramer into the
game. Kramer, who is reported to
be one of the finest rebounders inI
this area, has practiced for only
two days and tired very fast. He
has just started practicing after
finishing a great year at end on
the Wolverine gridiron squad.
Perigo used two other sopho-
mores in the game who have shown
great promise. Milt Lingle and
Bob Sharland entered the game in
the first half but saw only limited
action.
Captain Paul Groffsky, with 10
points, showed the only rebounding
strength, scoring several off the
backboards. Eaddy, with 12 points,
displayed a good set shot.
For the freshmen, Bil Rorabach'
tallied 19 points before he fouled

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

1

By The Associated Press
Ohio State, ruler of the Big Ten,
heads The Associated Press week-
ly football poll Tuesday for the
second straight week.
If the Buckeyes can remain No.
1 in the final poll next week, they'll
become the mythical national

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champions for the second time
since the AP rankings were in-
augurated in 1936.
Michigan slipped to 14th slot in
the poll.
This week's semifinal p o 11
showed Ohio State the No. 1 team
on the ballots of 115 of the 250
sports writers and broadcasters
participating.
On the basis of 10 points for
first, nine for second and on down,
Ohio State rolled up 2,259 points,
Called Off
Faculty Family Night will not
be held this week, due to the
Thanksgiving holiday. The next
one is set for Dec. 11.
just 97 more than for UCLA, cham-
pions of the Pacific Coast Confer-
ence. UCLA received 85 first place
votes and 2,162 points. A week ago
the Bucks topped the Uclans by
the slim margin of only 7 points.
A third major undefeated and un-
tied team, Oklahoma, drew the
No. 3 spot with 31 first place bal-
lots and 1,953 points.

The leading teams with first
place votes and won-lost records
in parentheses:
1. Ohio State 115 (9-0) ... .2,259
2. UCLA 85 (910) ..........2,162
3. Oklahoma 31 ((9-0) ......1,953
4. Notre Dame 4 (7-1) .... .1,569
5. Army (7-1) ...........1,296
6. Navy 2 (6-2) ............ 914
7. Mississippi 6 (8-1) ....... 873
8. Wisconsin (7-2)..........507
9. Baylor (7-2) ............ 332
10. Maryland (6-2-1) ......... 317
11. Miami (Fla.) 2 (7-1)...... 310
12. West Virginia 3 (7-1) .... 238
13. Arkansas 2 (7-2).........196
14. Michigan (6-3)..........173,
15. Auburn (6-3) ...........1421
16. Virginia Tech (7-0-1) ..... 109
17. Southern California (8-2). 94
18. Kentucky (7-3) ......... 55
19. Penn State (7-1) ........38
20. tie Duke (6-2-1)..........35
and Minnesota (7-2) .. 35'

LAST NIGHT'S SCORES
VOLLEYBALL
Social Fraternity
Psi Upsilon 3, Alpha Delta Phi 3
Phi Kappa Sigma 4, Alpha Phi Alpha
2
Sigma Alpha Mu defeated Delta Sig-
ma Phi (forfeit)
Sigma Alpha Epsilon defeated Pi
Lambda Phi (forfeit)
Professional Fraternity
Phi Alpha Delta 3, Psi Omega 3
Phi Chi 6, Alpha Rho Chi 0
Nu Sigma Nu 6, Alpha Kappa Psi 0
Delta Theta Phi 6, Alpha Kappa Kap-
pa 0
Law Club defeated Phi Delta Epsi-
lon (forfeit)
Faculty
Business Administration 6, Engineer-
ing Mechanics 0
Willow Run Research 5, Air Science 1
Psychology B' 6, Cooley 'A' 0
Museum 5, Public Health 1
HANDBALL
Social Fraternity
Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, Tau Kappa Ep-
silon 0
Sigma Chi 2, Theta Xi 1
Sigma Nu 2, Alpha Epsilon Pi 1
Sigma Alpha Mu 3, Kappa Sigma 0
Alpha Tau Omega defeated Tau Delta
Phi (forfeit)
Phi DeltaCTheta 3, Delta Tan Delta 0
Lambda Chi Alpha 2, Sigma Alpha
Epsilon 1
MONDAY NIGHT'S SCORES
VOLLEYBALL
Residence Halls
Scott 6, Hayden 0
Taylor 6, Hinsdale 0
Lloyd 3, Reeves 3
Huber defeated Strauss (forfeit)
Michigan 4, Anderson 2
Adams 6, Allen-Rumsey 0
Greene 3, Kelsey 3
Independent -
Hawaiians 5, Nakamura 1
Simple Seven 4, Evans Scholars 2
Latvians 6, Foresters 0
Cardinals 4, Roger Williams 2
HANDBALL
Phi Alpha Kappa 3, Alpha Omega 0
Tau Epsilon Rho defeated Psi Omega
(forfeit)
Phi Delta Phi 2, Alpha 'Chi Sigma 1
Gomberg 3, Lloyd 0

out late in the game.
Strack sorely missed
Tillison, who did not
game.

Coach Dave
center Pete
play in the

Final statistics released yester-
day by the Western Conference
revealed that Michigan rated first
defensively in the Big Ten, while
Ohio State ranked first offen-
sively.
Final ratings were based on a
computation of opponent's points,
Yardage, and first downs. Ohio
State actually boasted the best
"point figures" by scoring 182 and
giving up only 55. Michigan scored
118 and gave up 61 for averages of
16.9 and 8.7 per game.
Michigan halfback Danny Cline
ended up in sixth place in he Big
Ten in total offense, gaining a
total of 520 yards in seven games.
'en Dawson, sensational Purdue
sophomore, was the leader with a
net of 924 yards gained via his
passing.
Cline .also rated third in both
kickoff and punt return yardage,
and ninth in the Conference in
passing.
Kramer Rolls
Sophomore left end Ron Kram-
er led the Big Ten in punting with
an average of 41.4, while also plac-
ing fourth in pass receiving with
a total of 202 yards gained on 17
passes. Kramer also came in sixth
in total scoring with 31 points.
Earl Smith of Iowa was first with
48 points made on eight touch-
downs.
Kramer and tackle Art Walker
also received further laurels yes-
terday when they were named to

the United Press All-Big Ten fire
team, selected by the coaches.
The final Wolverine to gai
league recognition for the 195
season was senior fullback Fre
Baer, who placed sixth in rushini
All football secondary award
winners please report as soon
as possible to equipment room
in Yost Field House to be meas-
ured for sweaters.
-Henry Hateh
Iowa's Eddie Vincent rated firs
with a total of 566 yards averag
ing 6.9 yards per carry.
FINAL BIG TEN STANDiNGS

G. EDGAR MEADS
... grid leader
utes. A good deal of this time was
gained in last fall's Pennsylvania
game, which Michigan won, 24-14.
Helped Whip Wildcats
Although Meads' work all this
year has been strong, Michigan
football followers will probably re-
member most, his defensive alert-

M' First in Big Ten Defense;
Kramer Wins Punting Crown

s1

SPORTS
PHIL DOUGLIS
Night Editor

Ohio State.......7
MICHIGAN ....... 5
Wisconsin ........ 5
Minnesota ........ 4
Iowa..-........ 4
Purdue .... 3
Indiana..........2
Michigan State ... 1
Northwestern,.....1
Illinois ........... 0

0
2
2
2
3
4
5
5
6

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1.001
.714
.714
.667
.571
.510
.333
.167
.167
.000

Illinois............0 6
0 .000

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(and the pancakes)
"He's cute," said one coed to another.
"Umm, hmm, but he's crazy," replied Coed Two.
"Crazy how?" asked the first.
"Well, for one thing, look how he dresses. He has a whole
wardrobe of those perfectly stunning Van Heusen
Vanahue shirts .,. you know the beautiful colored ones
with the wonderful collar styles, those short ones and
button-downs and spreads and everything?"
"He must be loaded," commented No. 1. "He's really
cute."
"Silly. You don't have to be rich to own Vanahue Shirts.
They may look like custom shirts, but they oabv cost $3.95.,;
"So what's so crazy?"
"Look at him," replied No. 2. He's got on that lovely
green Vanahue with a blue suit.'
"I don't care. He's cute."
"But he could wear almost any of his othersa: the pink,
the yellow, the blue, or even the vintage. It's only
because he's nuts."
Shortly thereafter, our No. 1 girl met the freshman in
question at the drug store. With astonishing tact, she
said: "My girl friend thinks you're nuts."
"So does my room-mate," he replied sadly;
"Why?"
"Just because I like pancakes."
"I love pancakes," she answered.
"You do? Well, gee, come over to the fraternity house.
I've got trunks of 'em."
"You're cute," she sAid.
MORAL: Women are nuts.

on pt
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Read and Use
Daily Classifieds
111-___________________________________________

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