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November 24, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-24

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rAG1 TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1954

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMDER 24, 1954

LEBANON-SIZED TVA:
Peter Describes U.S. Aid in Program

By MARGE PIERCY
"A Lebanon-sized TVA" is the
way Hollis Peter describes the
main project of Point Four pro-
gram he headed in that country.
Peter, ;now assistant director of
the Foundation for Research on
Human Behavior, served as head
of the technical assistance pro-
gram to Lebanon from the winter
of 1951 to the winter of 1953. Prior
to that, he directed the field mis-
sion which set up the project in
cooperation with the national gov-
ernment there.
Development of the Litani River,
largest in Lebanon, was Peter's
bigest problem. While Lebanon has
the highest standard of living in
the Near East, Peter said, it is still
low by our standards.
Irrigation, power, water supply,
sewage and drainage had to be
considered in the project, which
aimed at finding a workable plan
for the five-dam system, to be fi-
nanced and built by the Lebanese
themselves.
Herd of Cattle
American engineers in the pro-
gram numbered between 40 and
50, while several hundred Lebanese
worked with them. Other facets of
the Point Four assistance included
bringing in a herd of pedigreed
livestock from Holland to improve
local cattle, setting up a national
health laboratory and a Lebanese-
American grade school.
Because of innovations in the
curriculum, the school met oppo-
sition from religious factions. "Le-
banon is theoretically a Christian
Plan Now for
Executive Career
in RETAILING,
Unique one-year course leads
you to Master's degree. Indi-
vidualized training for those
COLLEGE GRADUATES who
desire top-paying positions,
have average or better aca-
demic records, broad educa-
tional backgrounds. Training
in nationally known retail or-
ganizations with pay (covers
tuition, books, fees). Scholar-
shipC. Coed. Graduates placed.
Next class begins Sept. 6,1955.
Applications ac-
cepted now. Write
for Bulletin C.

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
HOLLIS PETER, FORMER HEAD OF POINT FOUR IN LEBANON

country," Peter explained, "but
there are almost as many Moslems
as Marinites (the name of the na-
tional church). Government jobs
are allocated on the basis of reli-
gion. For example, the President is
traditionally a Marinite and the
Prime Minister, a Mohamedan."
Peter named the attitude of the
Lebanese toward their government
as one of his major problems.
"They've been accustomed to poor
government until quite recently
and lack confidence."
Trained Personnel Needed
Discussing the aims of the pro-
gram, Peter stressed increasing the
number of trained personnel in
the country and developing con-
fidence in their own potentialities.
The Lebanese are very interested
in American help and treat Amer-
icans very well. "Their friendli-
ness and respect are diminishing
however," Peter pointed out, "be-
cause of what they feel to be our
favoritism toward Israel."
I RENT-A-CAR I

SCHOOL OF
RETAILING
UNIVERSITY OF
PITTSBURGH
Pittsburgh 13, Pa.

L.ICENsIM
Nye

Standard Rates
Include:
Gas and oil
and Insurance
Phone
NO 3-4156
NO 8-9757
Motor Sales
Inc.

Although he was born in Nan-
king, China, where his parents
were medical missionaries, the job
was Peter's first professional as-
signment overseas.
Worked on Marshall Plan
While in the State Department,
Peter worked with the office of
Intelligence Research and was act-
ing director of the program plan-
ning and advisory staff of the
'echnical Cooperation Administra-
tion. After World War II, he
served with the International Food
Allocation group and worked on
the development of the Marshall
Plan.
While working with Point Four,
he met Samuel P. Hayes, present
head of the Foundation for Re-
search on Human Behavior, which
Peter joined after leaving the gov-
ernment.
Antioch Plans
New Review
Prof. Nolan Miller and Prof.
Judson Jerome, members of Anti-
och College English department,
will edit a new annual review of
college writing.
Contributions to the new review,
which will be published in 1955,
will be limited to present students
at North American colleges, or
those who have attended during
the past three years and must be
previously unpublished material,
except on campus.
"Campus Writing Today," as the
review will be called, will publish
stories, poem, portions of novels,
short plays, sketches, essays and
articles, which must be recom-
mended by a member of the teach-
ing faculty. Deadline for the first
issue is May 1, 1955.
Our STUDENT SUPPLY
department is designed
for your shopping pleasure
Buy in the modern way
Self Selection
Shop and Save at
. .FOLLETTS
State St. at N. University

Tie-in Seen
WithSugar,
Tooth Decay
By TAMMY MORRISON
Removal of sugar from the diet
would end the problem of teeth
decay, Prof. Robert G. Kesel told
the American Dental Association
recently.
Prof. Kesel, head of the Depart-
ment of Materia Medica and Ther-
apeutics at the University of Il-
linois College of Dentistry, said
many studies of diet have con-
firmed the relation between sugar
consumption and decay activity,
Prof. Philip Jay of the Univers-
ity dental school said that sugar
would have no effect if it weren't
for the action of acid-producing
bacteria upon it. The bacteria
work on the sugar, manufactur-
ing acid which eats into teeth.
Opinions Differ
Opinion is divided over the de-
cay-reducing properties of fluor-
ine. Prof. A. P. Black, chairman of
the University of Florida, chem-
istry department, predicted that
within 10 years fluoridation of wa-
ter will be as routine as chlorina-
tion.
He said flourides are added to
water in 1,020 cities with a com-
bined population of more than 21,-
500,000. Fluoridation studies con-
ducted in Brantford, Oit., show-
ed 59 per cent reduction in tooth
decay; Grand Rapids, 70 per cent;
Newburg, N.Y., 69 per cent and
Evanston, Ill., 73 per cent.
Some groups in favor of fluori-
dation are the American Dental
Association, American Medical As-
sociation, United States Public
Health Service, American Acad-
emy of Pediatrics and the Ameri-
can Public Health Association.
Some individual citizens, includ-
ing a few physicians, are opposed
to fluoridating water.
Pro and Con Given
In two recent addresses to the
Eastern Dental Club and the
Grosse Point Physicians Club, Drs.
George L. Waldbott, J. Roy Doty
and Chester Tossy gave arguments
for and against fluoridation.
Dr. Waldbott stated that com-
munity health is endangered when
there is one part fluorine per mil-
lion parts water. According to Dr.
Doty, it would be impossible for
fluorine at that concentration to
have a toxic effect. He went on
to say that in communities where
drinking water naturally has more
than five parts per million, no
harmful effects have been traced.
"Some Should Not Hinder Many"
Another argument against fluor-
idation is that people with kidney
disease should drink nonfluorinat-
ed water. In reply to this, Dr. Doty
stated that if a doctor feels that
his patient should not have fluor-
inated water, he should put him
on flourine free water. He went on
to say that millions of people
should not be denied fluorinated
water because of a few people.
Fluorine is said to cause mot-
tling. Dr. Tossy agreed that this is
so, but also said that a distinction
should be made between the mild
mottling which might occur when
there is one part per million of
fluorine and the noticeable mot-
tling which occurs when the con-
centration of fluorine is much
higher.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building beforer2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday). Notice of
lectures, concerts, and organization
meetings cannot be published of tener
than twice.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1954
Vol. LXV, No. 56
Notices
Late permission for women students
who attended the Leonard Warren Con-
cert Sun., Nov. 21, will be no later than
11:08 p.m.
General Library and all Divisional Li-
braries will beaclosed Nov. 25 (Thanks-
giving Day) and Nov. 27. No Sun. Serv-
ice Nov. 28. The General' Library will
be open Wed., Nov. 24 and Fri., Nov.
26, 8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. All service units
within the building will be open on
their regular schedules. Divisional li-
braries will be closed Wed. eveningand
will be open their regular schedules
Fri., Nov. 26.
The National Research Council of
Canada announces Postdoctoral Fellow-
ships for 1955-56. Applicants should
not be more than 35 years of age and
should possess a Ph.D. degree from a
recognized. university, or expect to ob-
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING.
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Pedigree male Collie, in vicinity
of girls' Dormitories, answers to name
of OX. Call Theta Chi Fraternity
NO 2-3236. )45A
LOST-Lady Elgin yellow gold wrist
watch with expansion band last Sat-
urday, November 13. Lost between
Pen Club Special Train and Section
44 of Stadium. Sentimental value.
Reward. H. H. Coll, 1535 Pontiac Road,
SE.. Grand Rapids. )44A
LOST-Pair of Fur Lined leather gloves
Tuesday in Mason Hall. Call NO
2-2646. )46A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
1947 PLYMOUTH four door sedan, radio
and heater. The big lot across from
the downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)104B
THREE CHOICES--1951 Chevrolets. Ra-
dios, heaters, power glide. All four
doors. The big car lot scross from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)135B

r

MICHIGAN UNION DINING ROOM
Thanksgiving Day Menu - November 25, 1954
Hours: 12:30 to 3:00 P.M.

11

Fresh Gulf Shrimp Cocktail
Chilled Tomato Juice
Cream of Mushroom Soup aux Croutons

Baked Half Grapefruit
Fruit Cocktail
Consumme Royal
Mixed Olives

Iced Celery Hearts

Radishes

I

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-78 RPM Record Collection,
Popular and Jazz, also Walnut Esty
parlor organ, excellent condition $60.
Call NO 2-8262 after 6 p.m. )146B
1950 CHEVROLET two door, radio and
heater, Low mileage, one owner, very
nice. The big lot across from the
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)151B
1950 MERCURY CLUB COUPE, radio
heater and overdrive. Dark green
finish, beautiful condition. The big
lot across from the downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )150B
1952 NASH RAMBLER station wagon,
Radio and heater, low mileage and
very sharp. The big lot across from
the downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)149B
STANDARD Underwood Typewriter.
Good Condition $30.00. Call)NO
2-7937. )152B
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS-Large pleasant
sleeping room-twin beds, next to
tle bath. Call after 4:00 p.m. Mrs.
Harold Andrus, NO 8-7493. Clip and
save for future use. )20D
PERSONAL
SPECIAL RATES for students and for
Christmas on many mags. Student
Periodical. NO 2-3061. )38F
HELP WANTED
SALESMEN WANTED for home-im-
provement department Building
Specialties & Equipment Co., 4571
Washtenaw Rd., Ypsi. Call for ap-
pointment, Phone NO 2-3120. )20H

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020 Wool
soxs washed also. )81
R. A. MADDY--VIOLIN MAKER. Fine 4
instruments, Accessories. Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)101
RADIO-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University, Phone NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )481
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALITY
NO 2-7787
for 2x3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20

IFIESr~i

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FRIED DEEP SEA SCALLOPS on Toast with Tartar Sauce
BAKED SUGAR CURED HAM, Cider Sauce
ROAST ALMA DUCKLING, Apple Dressing, Orange Marmalade
ROAST TOM TURKEY, Chestnut Dressing, Cranberry Sauce
ROAST PRIME RIB OF BEEF, au jus
BROILED NEW YORK SIRLOIN STEAK, Maitre DeHotel
Buttered Green Peas or Brussels Sprouts or Mashed Hubbard Squash
Candied Sweet or Cream Whipped or French Fried Potatoes
Orange and Grapefruit Salad, French Dressing
Iceberg Lettuce Salad, Thousand Island Dressing

Hot Rolls
Milk

Rye Krisp
Tea

Coffee
Plum Pudding
Strawberry Parfait

Buttermilk

Pumpkin Pie with Whipped Cream
Hot Fudge Sundae

Pineapple Sherbet or DevilMint Ice Cream
Camembert Cheese, Toasted Crackers

STARTING THANKSGIVING DAY
Debbie Reynolds Dick Powell
IN
"SUSAN SLEPT HERE"

IA

ENDING
THURSDAY

[STRTEJ

Shows Daily
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.MA.

. A
It's now possible in new Velvet-ees shoes with Air-
Cushion Innersoles. Designed to give you day long
comfort. Choose from the largest variety ofrdress.
sport. work shoes for men, women, you ever saw I
For FREE demonstration drop me a card today.
JOHN OMAR DILLON
901 Packard Rd.

WUERTH
Coming-
Thursday and Friday
CONTINUOUS SHOWS
FROM 1:30 P.M.

I

--whatever
your major,
you can go on

A

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Wonderful! Wonderful!
THE STAR CLEANERS
AND LAUNDRY
1213 S. University
Get all of your clothes cleaner
Faster than any other!

I
pd(

STARTING FRIDAY
FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF CINEMASCOPE
MARLON BRANDO in "DESIREE"

i

I

WAYNE GOES WEST!!
jOHN WAYN'E .
DAL zvIwSADDXE
RA iNEE ADBN
GEORGE "GABBY" HAYES
and
LORETTA YOUNG
WILLIAM HOLDEN
RBERT MITCHUM
and .i
, s~x
Coming
Saturday-Sunday

Thursday
thru Sunday

ORPHEUM

Fri. 6:30
Sat.-Sun. 1:30
65C

Starting THURSDAY at 1:30 P.M.

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