100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

u

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1..954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 4,1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Finalists Announced
For Swimming Meet

Panel Will Discuss Immigration

Cynthia Camp, manager of the
intramural swimming tournament,
has announced the finalists for
the meet to be held at 8:15 p.m.
today.
Those qualifying for the 25 yard
free 'style are Emily Harding, Al-
phi Phi; Linda Miller, Kappa Al-
pha Theta; Peggy Moreland, Alpha
Phi; Susan Shipp, Stockwell; Pat
Barnes, Prescott and Beth Mihle-
thaler, Hobbs. The winning time
in,the preliminaries was 14.0 sec-
onds.
For the 25 yard backstroke,
Shirley Abbott, Phyllis Abbott and
Sally Fernamberg will represent
Alpha Phi. Linda Miller, Kappa
Alpha Theta; Jan Northway, Kap-
pa Kappa Gamma and Robin Piatt,
Collegiate Sorosis, will also com-
pete. The record set in the previous
meet was 17.4 seconds.
25 Yard Breast Stroke
Participating in the 25 yard
4 breast stroke will be Janice Tink-
Flag Kit Sale
Fraternity and sorority pled-
ges, in cooperation with the
Junior Chamber of Commerce,
are canvassing homes in Ann
Arbor today selling Flag Kits.
Working through Junior Pan-
hellenic Association and, Junior
Inter-Fraternity Council, each
pledge is devoting one night to
' the project.
The pledges will be driven to
the areas by JCC members.
Money collected will help fi-
nance an Ann Arbor swimming
pool.

ham, Kleinstuck; Betty Cole, Cou-
zens; Ellen Lauppe, Gamma Phi
Beta; Sue Shipp, Stockwell; Min-
na Weisenfeld, Mosher and Mary
Gronberg, Kappa Alpha Theta.
Out to beat the 31.0 seconds
preliminary record in the 50 yard
free style will be Emily Harding,
Alpha Phi; Minna Weisenfeld,
Mosher; Nancy Brinker, Collegiate
Sorosis; Mary Ann- Dawn, Mosh-
er; B. J. Muir, Chi Omega and Jan
Northway, Kappa Kappa Gamma.
Sue Shipp, Stockwell; Minna
Weisenfeld, Mary Ann Dawn, Mo-
sher; Gerry Van Duesen, Betsy,
Barbour; Claire Shepard,, Couzens
and Nancy Brinkler, Collegiate So-
rosis will compete to better the
preliminary record of 39.6 seconds
in the 50 yard back stroke.
50 Yard Breast Stroke
Winning time in the 50 yard
breast strobe was 43.2 seconds.
Participants for this event will be
Ellen Laupee, Gamma Phi Beta;
Trish Dow, Kappa Alpha Theta;
Janice Tinkham, Kleinstuck; Mary
Clagett, Tyler and Connie Butler,
Betsy Barbour.
Those houses participating in
the 100 yard free style relay, rec-
ord time 1.03 seconds, will be Al-
pha Phi, Kappa Alpha Theta,
Martha Cook, Collegiate Sorosis,
Chi Omega and Hobbs House.
Finalists in the diving event will
be Ann Stuart, Tyler; Jean Crock-
er, Newberry; Sally Fernamberg,
Alpha Phi; Grace Moore, Stock-
well; Shirley Eckwall, Newberry
and Cindy Camp, Couzens.
Michifish will also perform at
this time.

Immigration problems facing for-
eign students will be the topic of a
panel discussion at 8 p.m. tomor-
row at the Rackham Amphitheater.
Panel participants will be Mr.
Edward J. Duggan, Deputy Dis-
trict Director; Mr. Horace E. Wi-
ley, Chief of Inspection and Exami-
nation Branch, and Mrs. Lucile
Salyers, Chief of the Non-Immi-
grant Student Section.
These speakers represent the De-

troit Office of the U.S. Immigration
and Naturalization Service.
Those who are interested in dis-
cussing immigration and natural-
ization problems are welcome. It
is hoped that this discussion will
bring about a better understanding
between the foreign students and
immigration officials.
The program is sponsored by
the International Center and ISA.

Seniors and Graduate Students

pln, HI M

ww i+ Iv v{ f- 11 1I~i19I IV
£1 J54 L .1 .. LLALIO.NJAjQA

-Daily-Dean Morton

--Dan Kutt

WOMEN IN WHITE-At left, a group of future doctors has the fundamentals of physiology ex-

WAA Notces
FIELD HOCKEY CLUB "- The
Field Hockey Club will meet at 5
p.m. today in the WAB. All mem-
bers are asked to attend, regard-
less of the weather to organize
teams for tomorrow's game.
* * *
SPEED SWIMMING CLUB-The
Speed Swimming Club will meet l
at 5:10 p.m. today. Regular train-
ing will begin at this time.
SKATING CLUB-There will be
a meeting of the Skating Club at
7:30 p.m. today in the WAB base-
ment. Movies of Olympic figure
skating will be shown.
* * *
CO-REC NIGHT-There will be a
Co-rec Night from 7 to 10:30 p.m.
tomorrow in the IM Building. All
facilities will be available.
. . .
TENNIS CLUB-The Tennis Club
will hold no more meetings this
year, but will resume them again
in the Spring.
* * * ,
BADMINTON CLUB - The Co-
recreational Badminton Club will
hold its organizational meeting at
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 9.

plained to them by an instructor while at right two women medical students "burn the midnight
oil" as they study for an impending examination in anatomy.
Years See 'Hen Medics' Advance

Fountain Pens
Greeting Cards
Stationery
Office Supplies
Typewriters
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Files
f ss

C3
soma
0
emma
Q
90400
0
-"."

ETHICS-
BY GOD OR MAN
LECTURE:
Monday, November 8
DEAN LISTON POPE
8:30 P.M.
Angell Hall, Aud. A
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

By ELAINE EDMONDS
Times have changed in the 84
years since women were first ad-
mitted to the University's school
of medicine.
Back ih 1870 when the admit-
tance of women to the medical
school was being considered, the
medical school faculty went on
record as saying "the medical co-
education of the sexes is at best
an experiment of doubtful utility
and one not calculated to increase
the dignity of man nor the modes-
ty of woman."
This attitude is a far cry from
that existing today among the f a-
culty and administration
According to Assistant Dean
Wayne L. Whitaker, men and wo-
men applicants are judged on the
same basis. The close correlation
between the percentage of women
applicants which is about 5% and
the percentage of women in med
school which is over 4% bears out
this fact.
The grades of women compare
favorably with those of men. The
two top positions in the graduat-
ing class of 1954 were held by wo-
men.
Women medical students at the
University seem to feel that mar-
riage and a career do mix. Out of
a total of 38 women it the school,
eight are married. Of these eight,
four have children.
Although no study has been
made to determine what type of
practice women graduates go in-
to, the women med students voice
preferences ranging from general
practice to obstetrics, genocology
and psychiatry.

An important part of the life of
many female medical students re-
volves around a big house with a
friendly atmosphere which faces
Phelps Park. This is the h6me of
Alpha Epsilon Iota, the women's
medical sorority.
When the future aoctors gather
around the supper table each eve-
ning the topics of conversation
range from cases and clinical work
to dates and the antics of the
house's two pet parakeets.
According to the women the
backbone of the house is "Mrs.
Mike," Mrs. Audrey Michaels, who
has been there for 18 years. Be-
sides being the "best cook on cam-
pus," Mrs. Mike is always ready to

lend a friendly ear or a helping
hand.
Michigan was one of the first
medical schools to admit women.
Until 1881 the instruction given
the sexes was separate. Each pro-
fessor after giving his lecture to
the male students repeated the
same lecture in a smaller room to
the female students.
When the men and the "hen
medics," as the women students
were called at that time, began at-
tending classes together in the old
medical building amphitheatres
the faculty found it desirable to
bar off the section .to the left of
the lecturer by a broad red band
extending from the pit to the top
row of seats.

with a promising future.
- Positions available for:
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
METALLURGISTS
PHYSICISTS
Some of our best known products:
RADAR " GUIDED MISSILES s RECEIVING TUBES
UNDER-WATER SOUND EQUIPMENT " KLYSTRONS i MAGNETRONS
CATHODE RAY and SPECIAL PURPOSE TUBES
TRANSISTORS s DIGITAL COMPUTERS s ULTRASONIC EQUIPMEN:
CONTROL MECHANISMS w COMMUNICATIONS and TV EQUIPMENT
Encouragement (including financial assistance)
is given for University Graduate Study.
excellence in 'eedftonics
Raytheon Manufacturing Company
Waltham, Massachusetts
(/n the sburban Boston rea)
Consult your College Placement Office for further
information, literature and appointment.
Campus interviews on:

Big Ten Union Conference
Hears Talk byProfessor

P,

MORRILL'S
314 S. State Ph. NO 8-7177
Open Saturday 'til 5 P.M.

k

By ROBERTA CORWIN
Contributions, detractions, and
dangers of activities to higher
learning were discussed by Prof.
Harry J. Fuller, of the University
of Illinois Botany department, at a
recent Big Ten Union Conference in
Urbana, Illinois.
Robert Blossey, Richard Pinker-
ton and Harvey Rutstein, repre-
senting the Union, and Nan Schill-
er and Nancy Wright, of the
League heard Prof. Fuller tell the
delegates that working with oth-
ers, training to be efficient, gain-
ing perspectives and training in

leadership are the main contribu-
tions of these activities.
Speaking of the possible detrac-
tions, Prof. Fuller said that if fac-
ulties are not regulated and bal-
anced, they can cause havoc with
one's academic average.
The purpose of activities should
be the students' pleasure in work-
ing on projects, and should not be
professional, Prof. Fuller stressed.
He explained that professional fac-
ulty directors have to have win-
ning teams, growth, and real pro-
ductions, and in doing this, they
lose sight of the fun element in
activities.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER

5

Whirling Skirt for Dress-Up

{

Rustly taffeta in a great
sweep . . . springled with
a pattern of cut velvet . .
girdled by wide velvet.
The petticoat is a production
in itself-permanently
crisp nylon net. Beige and
rose in Misses sizes.
Casual shop.

I

S acony
gives worsted jersey
youngs.
intentions, ,25

YOU AND PAIRABLES-
A PERFECT PAIR...
Plan all your autumn activities
around new Pendleton "Pairables"
. . . separates perfectly coordinated
by color! You'll pair these
rich virgin woolens into costumes
for town, country, week-ending,
campus and every casual hour.
Choose from our complete "Pairables"
color palette, this versatile "49'er"
jacket $19.95; willowy new
Pendleton skirts, $14.95.

I

MAIN AT Li ERTy ANN A no
Only the finest quality at prices that are fair

Uf

I

I

' 1
," rt... :.: ,, ..:" *r ': : "!"
r .* V t :*. g ... * "" r and see our wide selection.
:. K,:- ".... : Imprts - Religious - M odern
, s: ",,Tall Cards Boxed Assortments

seein ,&CHARM
S. r,

i

11

A softly sculptured pure wool worsted jersey with the simple,
prettily straight-forward approach that catches your audience
(male, particularly) completely off-guard. Expensive touch: the
rib-knit insert in yoke and on pockets. New back interest: extra
skirt fullness and back-buttoning bodice. Choose from dark, dis-
creet colors and brilliant uninhibited ones. Proportioned sizes.
"It's a wonderful buy!"

/ '

II

It

I

_ i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan