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October 15, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-15

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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THE MICIGANT L 9T

FICID~AY, OCTOBER 15,-1954

-Daily-Dean Morton
JAMES COCO, DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER ACTOR
Coco Compares Experience
On Stage, Film,_Television

Court Rules
Against Bias
In Milford,
WILMINGTON, Del. (N) - Dela-
ware Thursday paved the legal
way for the re-admission of ten
Negro students to the formerly all-
white Milford, Del., High School.
Vice Chancellor William Marvel
ruled that the ten Negroes "have
a clear legal right" to attend the
Milford school, pending a final de-
cision by the Delawage Court of
Chancery in a case filed by the
National Assn. for the Advance-
ment of Colored People on behalf
of the ten children and their par-
ents.
There was no immediate reac-
tion to the vice chancellor's ruling
by the National Assn. for the Ad-
vancement of White People, or the
organization's president, Bryant
Bowles.
Louis L. Redding, attorney for
the NAACP, said in Wilmington it
would probably be the middle of
next week before the children re-
turn to the school.
He explained that the defendants
in, the case -- the Milford School
Board, the school superintendent
and the high school principal-have
until Tuesday noon to file argu-
ments or exceptions to the ruling
with the chancery.
If none are filed the chancery
then would issue an order, effec-
tive immediately which would
clear the way for the school to
readmit the pupils.
Mayor Edward C. Evans of Mil-
ford said he understands the school
board witl meet Friday to de-
cide whether to file exceptions to
the order. One source close to the
school board said he didn't think
they would.
Marvel did not specify in his or-
der when the students should re-
turn to class.
The NAACP suit was heard in'
Court of Chancery at Georgetown,
Del., last Tuesday. During the
hearing, State Atty. Gen. H. Albert
Young appeared "as a friend of
the court" and made a dramatic
appeal for readmission of the ten
Negroes.
In his ruling today, Marvel said:
"I hold that the plaintiffs have
constitutional rights to a non-seg-
regated education vested on their
admission to Milford High School,
rights that the defendants con-
cede but which they wish to with-
hold for the present. I find the
plaintiffs' legal rights clear and
convincing."

Italian String Musicians
To Appear Today at Hill

,I

By PHYLLIS LIPSKY
There is a "tremendous differ-
ence" in acting before a television
camera, for a film, or in front of
a live audience, "according to
James Coco, who has had exper-
ience in all three.
Coco, who prefers the stage,
feels that television acting is "just
like auditioning for a part." You
are always aware of the cameras
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and the time limit, he said, and
never give a full performance.
"I don't like it, I don't think
anyone likes it." But it pays well,
he pointed out.
Before joining the professional
acting staff of the Dramatic Arts
Center, Coco played in stock com-
panies all over the country, and
his most recent film is "It Should
Happen To You."
Filming Procedure
Describing filming procedure
the young actor said, "They give
you a script, say they're going to
shoot a film in 20 minutes, and
tell you to go off in a corner and
learn the part." When you see the
film, he added, "You are amazed
at the continuity of the thing."
Acting on a stage, on the other
hand, he described as a "wonder-
ful feeling." The actor can feel his
audience, Coco explained. "You
know when you've lost them and
then its your job to get them
back."
Coco had his first experience
with arena style theater, which
the Dramatic Arts Center is using,
in St. Petersburg, Fla. last year.
It is more difficult than acting in
a proscenium theater he said and
"I was a little afraid of it at
first."
Will Play Petkoff
Speaking of his role as Paul
Petkoff, the father in Bernard
Shaw's "Arms and the Man"
which opens Thursday at the Cen-
ter, Coco called him "comfortable,
genial and sort of a clown."
Coco's first job was with a sum-
mer stock company in Warwick,
N.Y. "I bluffed my way into it,"
he says.
The young actor came to the
job with almost no background in
the theater, but "I'd heard ex-
perience was the best teacher," he
said and "I claimed I had done
all sorts of things."
Three years later Coco was the
winner of the Barter Theater
Award and he was later selected
to study at Actors Studio in New
York under Eliza Kazan.

The Societa Corelli, 14 string
players from Rome, Italy, will
make its Ann Arbor debut at 8:30
p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
Its program will include the
"Concerto Grosso" by Corelli,
"Sarabanda, Giga and Badinerie"
by Corelli, "Sonata A Quattro" by
Rossini and "Concerto Grosso
L'Estro Armonico" by Vivaldi.
Chaos Feared
In Indochina
WASHINGTON (M)-A report by
a member of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee yesterday
said the situation in Indochina
has seriously deteriorated and in
South Viet Nam there is danger
it "could give way to complete in-
ternal chaos."
The report, made by Sen. Mans-
field (D-Mont) to the full com-
mittee, urged immediate suspen-
sion of U.S. aid "preliminary to a
complete reappraisal of our pres-
ent policies" if the tottering South
Viet-Nam government should fall.
Sen. Mansfield, who returned
last week from a two-month study
mission to Indochina, also recom-
mended that the Senate study
losses of U.S. military equipment
and other aid in Viet Nam, Laos
and Cambodia. He said expendi-
tures there since 1950 have exceed-
ed $2,600,000,000.
Hesaid according to best avail-
able estimates "some 25 per cent
of American economic aid went
into areas which are now held by
the Communists, an unwitting
gift . "
Under the Geneva cease fire
agreement of last summer, the
state of Viet Nam was divided into
two zones, with Communists con-
trolling the North zone and non-
Communists controlling the South,
pending a general election in
1956.
TV To Feature
Sports, Music
General chairman Joseph H.
Detwieler and volunteer worker
Mrs. Walter Bailey of the 1955 Ann
Arbor Community Chest Drive will
appear on DATELINE ANN AR-
BOR over WPAG-TV at 6:45 p.m.
today.
The Junior Hockey League will
be featured on "Sports Parade"
at 8 p.m. Ronald Roberts, assist-
ant director of the league will dis-
cuss the organization and objects
of the Hockey League, and Mar-
ian Chervat, manager of Michifish,
will speak on the university's syn-
chronized swimming club.
Music and magic will be pre-
sented on "Studio Sampler" at 7:30
p.m. today on the station, featur-
ing Ed Banghart, '55, singing folk
songs, accompanying himself on
the guitar. Also appearing will be
Charles Reynolds, Grad., with
tricks that have earned him the
reputation of being a first-rate
amateur magician.
High Schools Here
For Debate Clinic
The eighth annual debate clinic
will be held by the speech depart-
ment tomorrow at Rackham to ac-
quaint high school students with
debating techniques.
More than 40 high schools will
be represented, with 300 to 500 stu-
dents expected to attend. Included
in the meeting will be a demonstra-
tion debate by the University de-
bate squad. University faculty
members will discuss the "free
trade" debate question to be used
in this year's high school contests.

Tickets for the performance are
available at the University Musi-
cal Society in Burton Tower and
after 7 p.m. at the Hill Auditorium
box office. Prices are $3, $2.50,
$2 and $1.50.
The group is named after Arc-
angelo Corelli, a composer who
flourished at the beginning of the
18th century. Two of his works,
"La Folia" and the "Christmas
Concerto" are still part of the
standard orchestral repertoire.
Skilled both as a violinist and
as a composer, Corelli was invit-
ed to Rome by Pietro Cardinal Ot-
toboni, who remained his patron
for many years.
It was in Rome that Corelli es-
tablished his international reputa-
tion, long enjoying the homage of
the city. When he died in 1713 he
was- buried in the Pantheon.
As a composer Corelli added new
concepts to the art of music. Pre-
vious to his time, those who wrote
for orchestra thought in terms of
simple voice parts. Corelli recog-
nized the individual qualities of
the different instruments and al-
ways took them into account when
writing his concerti and suites.
The Societa Corelli has achieved
a noted reputation for its concert
performances.
The group will embark on their
second transcontinental tour this
season under sponsorship of the
Italian government.
Police To Hold
Bihe Auction
Abandoned bicycles about to be
auctioned by Ann Arbor police may
be claimed by their rightful own-
ers if proof of ownership is pre-
sented to the police before tomor-
row, Sgt. Howard Remnant said
yesterday.
The bicycles will be placed on
public auction at 10 a.m. tomor-
row in the parking lot next to City
Hall. Forty-four bikes of all makes,
including several hybrids, will be
auctioned.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday).
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1954
Vol. LXV, No. 21
Notices
Faculty, College of Engineering: There
will be a meeting of the Faculty of
this College on Mon., Oct. 18, 4:15
p.m. Room 348 West Engineering Build-
ing.
Choral Union Members are reminded
to pick up their courtesy passes admit-
ting to the concert by the Societa Cor-
elli, on the day of the concert Fri.,
Oct. 15, between 9:30 and 11:30 a.m.
and 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., at the offices of
the University Musical Society in Bur-
ton Tower.
Late permission for women students
who attended the program, "Jazz at
the Philharmonic" on Wed., Oct. 13,
will be no later than 12:40 p.m.
PERSONAL INTERVIEWS FOR
WEEK OF OCT. 18.
Representatives from the following
companies will conduct personal inter-
views on the campus at Engineering:
Mon., Oct 18
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
IJNES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 verage words to aline.
Classifiled deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00& -M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Kappa Delta sorority pin at
football stadium. Call NO 2-5631 or
return to 1620 Cambridge Road. )18A
LOST: ANDERSON PATHOLOGY BOOK
on campus. Call Ted Harrison, NO
3-0676. )15A
FOR SALE
1954 PLYMOUTH Convertible, black
Continental tire, all accessories, like
new. Cost in May, $3150. Sell for
$2075. NO 3-1184, between 6 and 7.
)83B
1945 PLYMOUTH SEDAN, good body,
motor and tires, $215. Call Jim Mul-
laney, NO 2-5695. )79B
ATTENTION FRATERNITIES: Folding
8-man Poker Table, felt covered, ex-
cellent condition, $25. Phone NO
3-2862. )80B
1947 OLDS, 2 door sedan, R&H, Hydra-
matic. A steal at $195. Call NO 3-3500.
)81B
LEAVING U of M, must sell '53 Morris
Miner, excellent condition, 38 mpg.
$700 or offer. NO 3-2791. )82B
ATTENTION GLEE CLUB MEMBERS.
Size 40 tails, good shape, $30. Phone
NO 2-9016. )77B
Cars Priced for the
Student's Pocket Book
1941 OLDSMOBILE SEDAN, ra-
dio and heater, $75.
1946 PONTIAC, 4 door, radio
and heater, $95.
1941 DE SOTO, 2 door, good
runner, $75.
1948 NASH CANVERTIBLE, $145.
1946 HUDSON SEDAN, $95.
1937 CHEVROLET, 2 door, $45.
1947 PLYMOUTH Convertible,
$195.
1951 HENRY J, $295.
1951 STUDEBAKER, $545.
Used Car Lots:
503 E. Huron, NO 2-3261
East Ann Arbor, corner of Packard
and Platt, NO 2-0171
Both lots open evenings till 9:00
)78B
1946 CHEVROLET CLUB COUPE, new
overhaul, good rubber, radio and heat-
er. The big lot across from the car
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Wash-
ington. NO 2-4588. )76B

331 S. 4th Ave.

NO 2-5523
) 84B

N Y ^
R 3
xs .'
MIL

1949 PLYMOUTH Convertible, Radio,
Heater, runs perfect, good top. The
'big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )64B
1949 FORD, 2 door Sedan. Radio, heat-
er, and overdrive. Price $365. Fitz-
gerald-Jordan. 607 Detroit. Phone NO
8-8141. )69B
1949 STUDEBAKER, 4 door, maroon,
radio, heater, over-drive, real clean
car. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales. 222
W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )65B
1949 FORD Custom Made radio, heater,
good rubber, real clean. See Smitty,
the big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )61B
XMAS CARDS from $1.95 up. Represent-
ing National Detroit. 10% and 15%
discounts. Contact Bob McCarty, 301
Michigan House, W.Q., Mail only. )91
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Kodak reflex camera with f 3.5
lens, including case $65..
Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 South
University. )11B
1932 FORD MODEL B, 4 door, new rub-
ber tires, heater and radio. The big
lot across from the car port. Huron
Motor Sales. 22 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )5OB
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
STANDARD PICA typewriter. Good con-
dition. Reasonable, 830 S. Main. )21B

FOR SALE
BENZ MOTORS
TIP-TOP CHOICE USED CARS
1949 PACKARD, two door, $295.
1949 NASH, 2 door, $295.
1948 PLYMOUTH, 4door, radio
and heater, $395.
Open evenings till 8:00 P.M.

FOR RENT
CAMPUS APT. for four men. Furnish-
ed two bedroom apt. $140. Inquire
518 E. William. NO 3-8454. )30
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now. Student Room
Bureau, No fee charged. NO 3-8454. )4D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve roonms now at the Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State St.) Ph. NO 3-8454. )3D
HELP WANTED
WANTED--Girl or Boy to help with
light housework and care of child-
ren, in exchange for room and meals.
No week-end help required, Call NO .r
3-3404. )10H
WANTED-Male Student, preferably
graduate, with mornings free, as shop
helper. Edward's Letter Shop. )9H
WANTED: Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Morning hours, very good sal-
ary. Route open in UY. Terrace and
Hospital area. Call NO 2-3241.
STUDENTS WIVES wanted for part
time work either mornings or after-
noons. Apply in person, Goldman
Brothers Cleaners, 214,S. State St. )7H
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Spec-
ialize in winter cottons and blouses,
wool soxs washed also. )8I
RAD IO-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service -- Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University, Phone NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )48I
MISCELLANEOUS
MAGS-at 8c; Life, New Yorker, US
News & World Report. At Bc-Time,
Newsweek. Phone Student Periodical,
ENO 2-3061, days, eves. )11L,

t

Vr
"9

-CAMPUS-
211 S. State
NO 8-9013
-DOWNTOWN--
MUSIC SHOPS 205 E. Liberty
NO 2-0675
for the Finest in Recorded Music

----
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FROM hf-G-M tN FIERY COLOR BY ,
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Human Relations
Group To Convene
The third annual Michigan Col-
lege Conference on Human Rela-
tions will be held Lct. 29 through
31 at St. Mary's Lake Camp, Bat-
tle Creek.
Organized to discuss campus and
community human relations prob-
lems, the conference will explore
ways of living together without
religious or racial bigotry and plan
activities which promote improved
human relations in the campus
community.
Michigan will sponsor a delega-
tion of ten faculty and students.
Doris Harpole of Lane Hall is or-
ganizing the team.

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Classifieds
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union little club

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Cinemna SL quild

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------

Starting
TODAY..i

CinemaScope Prices
Matinees 65c
Ees, and Sun. 9.
Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

CAPTAIN HORATIO I
HORNBLOWER
(Technicolor)
GREGORY PECK
VIRGINIA MAYO
Tonight 7:00 and 9:00
THE GHOST
AND MRS. MUIR
REX HARRISON
GENE TIERNEY

TRYOUTS for.
"Lady's Not For Burning"
FALL PRODUCTION
STUDENT PLAYERS
IN THE LEAGUE
Sunday, 2:30 P.M. Mon., Tues., Wed., 7:30 P.M.

(

JAMES
STEWART
-ALFRED
14ITCHCOCK'S
REAR
WINDOW
COLOR B Y
TECHNIco.Lo]
to-storring

I

Today thru
Sunday

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~HE UM Fri. 6::30
65c

Oh, That Wonderful Noel Coward!
"A jaunty spree 'Done with sophistication and
in impudent exactitude I" -Herald Tribune
humor!"-W
Te/es-un:* "Shot through with compassion
and humor... funny and trench-
ant-typical Noel Coward 1"
;r. -N.Y. Times

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