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October 15, 1954 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1954-10-15

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FRmAF,. OCTOBER 15, 1954

T--U-- MCSIGAN DAILY

PAGE THR19

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1954 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THRI

v

ELIMINATION PROPOSED:
Bias Clauses Discussed at Colorado

(4

By HARRY STRAUSS

v'

A University of Colorado Regent
has proposed a motion to 'end all
fraternity and sorority discrimina-
tion there by 1960.
The motion, which will be acted
upon next week in Boulder, Colo.,
has already raised protests from
students, social organizations and
regent members alike.
Plan Outlined
Basis of the plan as formulated
by Regent Vance Austin is that:
"No new organization with. char-
ter p r o v i s io n s discriminating
against candidates because of race,
creed or color shall be approved
by this University."
Any existing organizations, the
resolution continues, who have
such provisions can remain in good
standing only if they make a "de-
termined effort . . . to secare
amendments to their respective
constitutions."
Under this provision, the organi-
zation may eliminate restrictions
gradually as long as they are com-
pletely eliminated by 1960.
Deadline
"No such organization which has
in its national or local constitution
or pledge instructions a discrim-
inatory clause, shall be approved
by the University after July 1960."
The last part of the resolution's
text states that this action in no
way abridges an organization's
"freedom to select individual mem-
bers on their own individual mer-
its."
President Ward Darley -has set
up a student-faculty committee on
Student Organizations and Social
Life to investigate - present "pos-
sible discrimination," according to
the Colorado Daily.
Opposition Head
Following Austin's motion most
of the other regent's members
voiced their approval of the idea.
One regent, in complete opposi-
Center Sponsors
Dance Program
The International Center will
sponsor classes in social and Latin
American dancing to be taught by
students from South America and
lessons in numerous foreign lan-
guages.
An organizational meeting for
the dance classes is scheduled at
7:30 p.m. Monday at the Interna-
tional Center. Time of the classes
and other details will be discuss-
ed.
Students interested in learning
a foreign language may contact
the International Center for ar-
ranging instruction.

tion stated that "no authority has
a right to interfere with a group
which should be allowed to choose
its own social contacts."
Fraternity and sorority reaction
was mixed. Some refused to com-
ment while others merely stated
that they did or did not have- re-
strictive clauses in their constitu-
tions. A few of the 16 sororities
and 24 fraternities agreed that
while the idea for discrimination
removal was good it should be
done slowly by the organizations
themselves.
A student's letter that appeared
in the Colorado Daily, in opposing
the move, noted that an attempt of
an Amherst College fraternity to
have a Negro student in the house
had "very unhappy consequences
for all those concerned."
'U' Similarity
Plans similar to this one have
been put into effect by several

schools, the University of Wiscon-
s i n a n d Columbia University
among them.
A not very different situation
exists here at the University since
19,49. At that time the Administra-
tion handed down a ruling prohib-
iting new organizations, or reacti-
vated groups, which choose mem-
bers on a basis of race, color or
creed.
Since that time, the Interfrater-
nity Council has attempted follow-
ing a policy of assisting any fra-
ternity trying to abolish its consti-
tutional restrictive clauses.
Since the 1949 ruling, many fra-
ternities have attempted to go to
their national meetings and see
about removing these clauses.
During the last summer, two fra-
ternities dropped such clauses from
their constitutions, while others are
expected to bring the matter up in
future national meetings.

Six Stations Use Kinescopes
Of 'U- Educational Programs

By CAROL NORTH
One cf the nation's first adult-
level education programs on tele-
vision has been launched by the
University.
Although plans for a means of
broadcasting directly from Ann Ar-
bor are being made, the programs
are now being carried over com-
mercial stations.
The new means of education is
estimated to reach over a million
viewers. Shows are carried on six
stations, almost throughout the
lower half of Michigan.
Programs on Kinescope
Stations in Detroit, Lansing,
Grand Rapids, Cadillac, Ann Ar-
bor and Kalamazoo now receive
the kinescopes made in the Uni-
versity television studio. Accord-
ing to Program Production Man-
ager Hazen Schumacher, this is
more effective than the former
method of driving into Detroit to
produce live shows.
In the past four years, viewers
interested in registering for the
courses given on TV received sup-
plementary material and a certifi-
cate stating their participation.
This, however, did not entitle
them to University credit. The
practice has been discontinued this
year.
The first series to be offered this
year will be "The Teen Ager: A
Study of Adolescent Behavior," at
1 p.m. Sunday. Taught by Prof.
William C. Morse of the psycholo-
gy department, the lectures will
deal with dating habits, personal

and social adjustments, families
and adolescence.
Prof. James H. Zumberge of the
geology department will instruct
the following course on "Our
Changing Earth: The eGology of
Michigan." Opening with an in-
troduction to the elements and
compounds that make up the crust
.of the earth, the lectures will de-
scribe the formation of the Great
Lakes and Michigan's geological
history.
Last in the fall series is "Plan-
ning Your Financial Future." It
is organized and coordinated by
the School of Business Adminis-
tration in cooperation with the
banks and trust companies of De-
troit. The course is. planned to give
viewers 'practical aid in solving
problems of budgets, investments,
home ownership, taxes and wills.
Scientific Papers
'To lie Presented
Twenty scientific papers in the
field of clinical medicine will be
presented tomorrow at the region-
al meeting of the American Feder-
ation for Clinical Research in the
School of Public Health Building.
The organization is composed of
young doctors who work in clini-
cal and experimental medicine.
More than 50 physicians will read
papers in various fields including
arteriosclerosis, diabetes and per-
nicious anemia.

Interviews
Those interested in being in-
terviewed for chairman of the
Academic Freedom Sub-Com-
mitte of the Culture and Edu-
cation Committee of Student
Legislature may contact Joan
Bryan, '56, at NO 2-2591 or at
the Student Legislature office
in the Union before Tuesday,
Oct. 19.
Satiric Team
To Broad-cast
Tuesday nights at 10 p.m. "Bud-
dha and Harv," a new weekly se-
ries of satiric nonsensisms, will
come over the air- via WCBN, the
Campus Broadcasting Network.
Originating from the radio stu-
dios of South Quadrangle, the
show, handled 'by Chicago-area
freshmen Bob Birnbaum and Har-
vey Bailey, will present interviews,
discussions, playlets, and "zany"
recordings.
The "Harlan Katcher Record-of-
the-Week," "Letters from Listen-
ers," "Sports Incinerated," and a
weekly "Official Buddha and Harv
Contest" will be included among
many special features. Listeners
who wish to discuss problems' of
school-life may call into the station..
The person who first identifies
the Mystery Word, according to
Bailey "a common everyday
household word like 'Parthenon'
or 'xanthrophyll" will win a valu-
able prize such as a life-size pic-
ture of the Waterman Gym drink-
ing fountain or a pair of Bermuda
shorts once worn in the Adminis-
tration Building."
Alpha Phi Omega
Plans Blood Drive
The local chapter of Alpha Phi
Omega, national service fraterni-
ty is awaiting approval by the Stu-
dent Affairs Committee before pro-
ceeding on its proposed blood
drive.
SAC does not meet until Octo-
ber 26. Sherwin Sokolov, '56, pres-
ident of the local chapter said "un-
til that time we can make no defi-
nite plans about the drive."
Engineering Group
The Michigan Regional Confer-
ence of the American Foundry-
man's Society, sponsored by the
chemical and metallurgical engi-
neering and production* engineer-
ing departments, ends its annual
conference today with two sessions
at 9:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. in Rackham
Building.

EAST LANSING, (P)-Cancer of
the lung can be cured, a Grand1
Rapids surgeon told the Leader-
ship Training Conference for Amer-1
ican Cancer Society Volunteers yes-
terday at Michigan State College.
The speaker was Dr. Richard
H. Meade of Grand Rapids, vice'
president of the American Associ-
ation of Thoracic Surgery.
"Every man over 40 should have
chest X-rays every six months and
others at less frequent intervals,"
Dr. Meade said.
"When lung cancer is found as
the result of a routine chest X-ray,
and before symptoms develop, the

patient has about a 75 per cent
chance of being cured," he re-
ported.
Dr. Clifford D. Benson of Detroit,
associate professor of surgery at
Wayne University Medical School,
said that cancer today kills more
children from three to 15 years
than any other disease.
"It cannot be emphasized too
much that cancer in children is
not always fatal," he said.

CAN BE CURED:
Surgeon Talks on Cancer

TA-XI
RADIO DISPATCHED
VETERAN'S CAB
NO 2-4477

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