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October 06, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6,1954

Police Start
Crackdown
On Vehicles
Ann Arbor's police department
is now beginning a crack-down on
cars parked in one location for
more than 48 hours and on bicycles
operating without lights during the
night.
Under a city ordinance, Lt. Har-
rison Schlupe of the police depart-
ment said yesterday, cars parked
more than 48 hours can be towed
away and impounded at the own-
er's expense. Automobiles parked
that long are automatically consid-
ered to have been abandoned.
However, the lieutenant asserted,
cars will be towed away only if
they aren't moved. If a car is driv-
en to another spot within 48 hours,
no police ticket will be given, Lt.
Schlupe said.
"Streets Aren't Parking Lot"
"Ann Arbor streets are not a
parking lot," he continued. "Too
many students are driving cars to
campus on Monday and leaving
them parked in one spot until Fri-
day."
All-out enforcement of the city's
bicycle ordinance, passed originally
in 1937, will begin next week. Since
University classes began this fall,
Lt. Schlupe pointed out, two or
three serious accidents involving
bicycle riders have occurred.
At present many bicycle riders
are breaking sections of the mo-
tor.vehicle code to which they must
conform. Probably the most com-
mon offense is riding a bicycle aft-
er dark without a light at its front
which can be seen from 300 feet
away and either a red light or re-
flector in the rear of the bicycle
capable of being seen from a dis-
tance of 200 feet.
Must Observe Signs
In accordance with the motor ve-
hicle code, bicycle riders must ob-
serve stop signs and red lights,
along with driving on the right side
of the road. Lt. Schlupe also said
that when a bicycle approaches a
pedestrian, the pedestrian has the
right of way. This rule has been
violated frequently around the Uni-
versity campus, he added.
Pointing out other often-neglected
sections of the ordinance, the po-
liceman went on to say that bi-
cycles may never be driven more
than two abreast and must stay in
single file when cars approach.
Before making turns, the bicycle
rider must give a hand signal and
must obey all traffic signals and
warnings. He should also use a bell,
horn or similar warning signals
when necessary and when in traf-
fic, must give cars at least one-
half of the main traveled portion of
the street in which to pass the
rider.
Lt. Schlupe mentioned that more
than 40 abandoned bicycles will be
auctioned Oct. 16 at City Hall.
Spring Weekend
Petitions for the Spring Week-
end chairmanship should be turn-
ed in at the Union Student offices
before Friday, according to Tom
Leopold, '55, Union President.
Information on the petitions
may be obtained from Leopold
from 3 to 5 p.m. daily in the stu-
dent offices.

Foreign Students Enrolled
Number More Than 1,000

T oELRU( flwo

James M. Davis, director of the
Iternational .Center, reported that
foreign student enrollment at the
University has topped the thousand
mark for the first time with a to-
tal of 1,089, an increase of 129 over
last year's mark.
Seventy countries are represent-
ed by the record group showing an
addition of two countries, Para-
guay and the Union of South Africa.
A study of regional distribution
reveals that each region has in-
creased its number of students.
Enrollment from the Far East is
up 54 with a total of 364. Students
from the British Commonwealth of
Nations number 261, an increase of
46. Fourteen more students come
from Europe and Africa bringing
the regional total to 198. Latin
America with a representation of
138 shows an increase of 13 over
last year's total while enrollment
from the Near East rose by 14 to
142.
Have 10 or More
Countries with ten or more stu-
dents are Canada with 203, India

with 74, China with 66, the Philip-
pines with 62 and Turkey with 48.
Iraq has a representation of 40,
Japan of 38, Venezuela and Thai-
land, 36 each, Columbia and Ger-
many, 32 each, and Great Britain
tand North Ireland 27.
Korea's enrollment is 22, Israel,
17, and Burma, 16, while Pakis-
tan's student representation totals
14, Egypt's, 11, and Greece, Neth-
erlands and Norway total ten each.
Ninety-eight students have come
from behind the Iron Curtain this
year with an increase of 19 over
last year. They are now in the
process of gaining United States
Citizenship.
Canada Shows Greatest Increase
Greatest increase of enrollment
is that of Canada which has
stepped from 172 to 203, while the
most marked loss is China which
dropped from 80 to 66.
"However," Davis pointed out,
"although the number of Chinese
students is decreasing, it is sig-
nificant to note that there were
20 new students from free China
this fall. "

DAILY OFFICIAL~BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an t
official publication of the University3
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 35531
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be.1
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday).1
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1954 1
Vol. LXV, No. 14
Notices
Freshman Testing Program: Make-up1
sessions for Freshmen who missed any
of the Aptitude tests given during Ori-
entation Week will be held on Tues.,1
Oct. 5 and Thurs., Oct. 7. Please reportF
to Room 130, Business Administration
promptly at 7:00 p.m. For further infor-
mation call ext. 2297.
University Directory. All additions
and corrections for office and home ad-
dresses must be reported by Mon., Oc-
tober 11. For further information, call
Florence Boyd, 1523 Administration
Bldg., Extension 2152.
Staff members who wish to join Blue
Cross-Blue Shield hospitalization -plans,
or those who wish to change the cov-
erage on their present plans, will have
an opportunity to do so from Oct. 11
through Oct. 22, at the Personnel Of-r
fice, Room 3012, Administration Build-
ing. New applications and changes will
become effective Dec. 5, with the first
payroll deductions on Nov. 30.
Persons not already enrolled, who do
not join during this period, will not
have another opportunity to do so un-
til April, 1955. New staff members,
however, are accepted for membership
at any time during the first 3 days of
employment.
Late permission for women students
who attended the Roberta Peters con-
cert on Mon., Oct. 4 will be no later
than 11:20 p.m.
An open invitation is extended to all
Resident Directors to attend I-Hop.
Tickets are still available for League
dance classes, Mon., Tues., or Wed.
Hostesses apply at Undergrad Office.
PERSONAL INTERVIEWS-WEEK OF
OCT. 11-
Representatives from the following
companies will conduct personal inter-
views on the campus at Engineering:
Mon., Oct. 11
Rome Air Development Center, Rome,
New York-All degree levels in Electrical
Engr., and B.S. & M.S. in Engr. Math
and Physics, Chem. Engr. if interested
for Graund-Based Electronic Research
and Development.
Detroit Arsenal, Centerline, Mich.
B.S. In Chem., Elect., Mech., & Metal.
Engr. for Research and Development.
Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., Akron,
Ohio-B.S. & M.S. In Mech., Elec., Ind.,
Chem., & Metal. Engr. and Chemistry
and Bus. Ad. graduates for 1955 College
Technical Group.
United States Gypsum Co., River
Rouge 18, Mich. -B.S. in Chem., Elect.,
Mech., & Ind. Engr. for Production
Supervision and Plant Engineering.
Tues., Oct. 12
National Advisory Comm. for Aero-
nautics, Cleveland, Ohio - All degree
levels in Aero., Chem., Elect., Mech.,
Metal Engr. and Engr. Mechanics, Engr.
Math., and Engr. Physics for Research,
Development, Design, & Operations.
Wed., Oct. 13
California Oil Co. (Standard Oil Co.

of Calif.), Perth Amboy, New Jersey-
B.S. & M.S. in Chem. Engr. and others
interested for Process Development and
Technical Services.
Columbia Gas Systems Service Corp.,
Ohio Fuel Gas Co., Columbus, Ohio-
B.S. in Civil, Elect., Ind., & Mech.
Engr. for Engineering and Planning of
Production, Transmission, & Distribu-
tion of Natural Gas.
Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Co.,
Minneapolis, Minn.-B.S. Incd. Engr.
and all degree levels in Aero., Engr.
Mechanics, Mechanical and Engr.
Physics. B.S. for Design Test, Produc-
tion Engr. and Sales. M.S. & Ph. D. for
Design, Developient and Research.
Chance Vought Aircraft, Inc., Dal-
las, Texas-B.S. and advanced degrees
In Aero., Civil, Elect., Mech. Engr., and
advanced degrees only in Math. and
Physics for Research, Design, Develop-
ment of Military Aircraft.
Thurs., Oct. 14
Chance Vought Aircraft, Inc., Dallas,
Texas-See above-here only in a.m. on
Oct. 14.
The Shelby Salesbook Co., Shelby,
Ohio--B.S., in Mech. or Ind. Engr. or
other program interested, military ob-
ligation fulfilled, 26 years old or less
for Plant Engineering.
Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.-Al degree levels in all
fields of Engr., Chem., Physics, and
math, for Engr., Chem., Physics, &
Math, positions.
Fri., Oct. 15
Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.-See above.
Celanese Corp. of America, Summit,
New Jersey-All degree levels in Chem.
Engr., and Engr. Physics for Research.
Students who wish to make appoint-
ments for interviews with any of the
above companies should contact the
Engineering Placement Office, ext. 2182,
room 248 W. Engr.
Lectures
University Lecture: "The Clinical Im-
portance of Sodium in the Contraction
of Cardiac and Smooth Muscle." By
R. J. S. McDowall, M.R.C.P., F.R.S.M.,
President of the Physiological Section
of the British Association for the Ad-
vancement of Science, Professor of
Physiology and Dean of the Faculty
of Medicine, Kings College, University
of London. Racham Amphitheatre,
Fri., Oct. 8, 4:15 p.m. The public is in-
vited to attend.
American Chemical Society Lecture.
Thurs., Oct. 7, 1954, 8:00 p.m. in Room
1300 Chemistry. Professor Hans Schmid
of the University of Zurich, Switzer-
land, will speak on "Chemistry of Some
Natural Products f r o m Tropical
Plants."
K. C. Tiffany, Vice-President in
charge of Finances of the Burroughs
Adding Machine Company, will speak
on "Finances In The Modern Corpora-
tion." The talk will take place in Rm.
140, Business Administration Bldg.Tat
7:30 p.m. on Thurs., Oct. 7. Mr. Tif-
fany will be the first speaker of a
year round program sponsored by Del-
ta Sigma Pi. The public is cordially
invited.
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: White gold Bulova watch, black
band, in Health Service. Call NO
2-2591. )10A
FOR SALE
1951 ANGLIA, one owner, very good1
condition, new heater, up to 35 M.P.G.,
parts available locally, reasoable, NO
2-5128. )57B
For the Bestes
See Herb Estes
1941 Oldsmobile Sedan ...... $75
1947 Plymouth Convertible .. $245
1946 Dodge two door........$175
1947 Chevrolet four door station
wagon. Really in excellente
shape.....................$345
1947 Ford four door sedan. Very
good mechanically....... $245
Every used car backed by a 6
months warranty. Oil change
and grease job with every pur-
chase. Open Evenings. 503 E.
Huron. NO 2-3261.
Herb Estes, Inc.
)55B
$120 ARTILLERY BINOCULARS. Price
$50. Good for football games. Phone
NO 2-0544. )56B
1947 PLYMOUTH 4 door, radio and
heater. $100. Fitzgerald-Jordan. 607,
Detroit. Phone NO 8-8141. )54B
XMAS CARDS from $1.95 up. Represent-
ing National Detroit. 10% and 15%
discounts. Contact Bob McCarty, 301
Michigan House, W.Q., Mail only. )91
VAGABOND 34 ft. modern completely
furnished mobile home. Near bus lines
and stores. Call NO 2-9221 after 4
p.m. )52B
1941 CHEVROLET, 2 door, radio and
heater, new rubber tires, one owner.
The big lot across from *the car
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )51B
1953 NASHUA 23-foot trailer, aluminum,
modern. See evenings or weekends,
2397 Textile Road. )53B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Kodak reflex camera with f 3.5
lens, including case $65.
Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 South
University. )11B

FOR SALE
1932 FORD MODEL B, 4 door, new rub-
ber tires, heater and radio. The big
lot across from the car port. Huron
'Motor Sales. 22 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )50B
1954 CHEVROLET, USED, very low mile-
age. Call George, NO 2-7293. )43B
MUST SELL-Two Hollywood beds, Sim-
mons box spring and mattresses, two
years old, good condition. 1013 Arbon-
dale, Atp. 2, NO 2-4661. )37B
1951 KAISER four door. Blue, radio,
heater, hydromatic, new tires, the big
lot across from downtown carport.
Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Washing-
ton. NO 2-4588. )31B
1947 DODGE CLUB COUPE, radio,
heater, new rubber Stires. The big lot
across from down to %n carport. Huron
Motor Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )34B
1951 CHEVROLET two door, radio and
heater, Beige color, one owner, real
clean. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales. 222
W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )32B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
1948 PLYMOUTH CLUB COUPE. Green.
Real clean car. See Smitty. Huron
Motor Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )13B
STANDARD PICA typewriter. Good con-
dition. Reasonable, 830 S. Main. )21B
FOR RENT
CAMPUS APT, for four men. Furnish-
ed two bedroom apt. $140. Inquire
518 E. William. NO 3-8454. )3C
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now at the ('ampus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. Willt (near
State St.) Ph. NO 3-8454. )3D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now. Student Room
Bureau. No fee charged. NO 3-8454. )4D
ROOM AND BOARD
HOME COOKING for men. Well bal-
anced meals. Rebates. 1319 Hill St.
Call NO 2-6422. )48
HELP WANTED
IDEAL SALES POSITION for married
sorority graduate. Operate local fra-
ternity jewelry store. State refer-
ences in letter to Burr, Patterson
and Auld, 2301 16th Street, Detroit,
or call Tashmoo 5-7200. )6H
TWO STUDENTS for telephone sur-
vey work, between the ages of 20
and 25, four hours every week night.
Cali Miss Westin at NO 3-4143, Wed-
nesday between 3 and 6 p.m. )5H
PERSONAL
ANYONE FOR A PARTY? See tomor-
row's paper and join the fun! )8F
ATTENTION: All former Stephens
Susies contact Diamond, Jackman,
587 Jordan. )15F

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Spec-
ialize in winter cottons and blouses.
)8I
RAD I O-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1% blocks east of East Eng. )481
DR. KENNETH N. WESTERMAN, re-
search member of the National As-
sociation of Teacher's of Singing,
author of "Emergent Voice," class
and private lessons in singing and
speaing. Studio, 715 Granger. Phone
NO 8-6584. )3I
STUDENTS I CONTINUE YOUR PIANO
study at college under experienced
teachers. Practice facilities avail-
able. THE ROBERT DUMM STUDIOS.
Phone NO 2-3541. 11
DO YOU WANT a new dress made, al-
terations, or hems turned .up? Call
NO 3-0783. )2I
MISCELLANEOUS
FACULTY-STAFF
Ladies Home Journal..........
........$3.50 (16 mos.) (reg. $4.25)
Life.............$4 (reg. $6.75 yr.)
Newsweek ...... $4.50 (reg. $6.00 yr.)
Sat. Eve. Post .... $5.00 (reg. $6.00 yr.)
Time ............ $4.75 (reg. $6.00 yr.)
Time...............$10.00 '(3 yrs.)
Phone Student Periodical NO 2-3061.
)8L
PLAN NOW FOR SUMMER '55.-Eur-
ope, $399, 30-day, 4,500-mile by pri-
vate car. One year free travel in-
surance. Everv 5th tour memnber gets
free land tour worth $250. Write
TEMPLEMAN TOURS, 337 W. Mason.
Jackson, Michigan. )50

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POETRY- FICTION -ART- DRAMA- ESSAY
Deadline for November Issue: October 12

t

STONE AGE MAN
Beyond the Last Frontier . . . hidden from modern civilization
by the mountain ranges on the Pacific island of New Guinea,
Only on the FILM LECTURE platform can the exciting pag-
eantry of primitive man be shown to the public so realistically.
A documentary COLOR MOTION PICTURE produced after
six years of daring adventure by the noted interpreter of
primitive life, COLONEL ARNOLD M. MAAHS, Sociologist,
author, lecturer, and film producer who will be here IN
PERSON to tell of his fascinating jungle experiences on
Sunday, October 10 at 3:00, Pattengill Auditorium
105 South State Street
Single admission $1.00 on afternoon of performance, Pattengill Ticket Booth.
SEASON TICKETS for six outstanding film-lecture programs only $4.00.
On sale at Wahr's Bookstores and Ann Arbor Public Evening School.
Don't Miss This Superb Opening Performance!
Sponsored by Ann Arbor Public Schools, Beta Sigma Phi Sorority,
Exchange Club, and Institute for Regional Exploration.

A

--------

!T

THREE THOUSAND MEMBERSHIPS NEEDED...
To Assure Ann Arbor of a Successful Resident Professional Theatre

I

ENDING TODAY
"Mr. Laughton plays the windy and
bibulous curmudgeon right down to
the ground." ,.Crowther,
New York Times
--O

11

"The Dramatic Arts Center is a non-profit organization of civic minded citizens which
seeks to encourage Ann Arbor and the surrounding community in interest and parti-
cipation in the arts. A major portion of the program is the attempt to establish a
resident professional theatre. Ann Arbor is fortunate in the scope and variety of
cultural advantages which it provides. But the requirements of the community as
well as the large student population are not being fully met. Your support is needed
NOW to assure success."r
--1954-55 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Clan Crawford
Eugene Power

Otis Hardy
Damon Wood

Warner Rice
Richard Boys

DRAMATIC ARTS
CENTER
ARENA THEATRE -- MASONIC TEMPLE
1954-55 PLAYBILL
"ARMS AND THE MAN"
by George Bernard Shaw -
October 21 to, November 14
"THE LONDON MERCHANT" or
"GEORGE BARNWELL"
by George Lillo
November 18 to December 12
"THE MOON IN THE
YELLOW RIVER"
by Denis Johnston
December 31 to January 20
"CALIGULA"
by Albert Camus
January 27 to February 20

Mrs. Jessie Coller Mrs. Burnette Staebler Richard Wilt
David Reed
- - ......... ..................... .-
THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER INCORPORATED
Box 179, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Masonic Temple, 327 S. 4th Ave.
Phone NO 2-5915

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