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October 02, 1954 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-02

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2,1954

TIIE MICHIGAN DAILY'

PAGE TEMLFV

SATURDAY. OCTOBER 2.1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TRUE?

Gomez, Rhodes, Mays

Lead Giants to
World Series

Third
[ictory

(Continued from Page 1)
pinch hitter Dave Pope on hard
grounders to second baseman Da-
vey Williams.
Giant fans would have a tough
time, singling out a hero for this
workmanlike Job. There were
many. Gomez allowed only four
hits in 7 1-3 innings. Wilhelm gave
up none. Rhodes did it again as a
pinch hitter and Mays, hitless in
the first two games, broke out
with three singles to send his av-
erage to .300.
Indian Bobbles Hurt
Mike Garcia, the Big Bear of
the Cleveland staff, simply didn't
have enough to offset his wildness,
an error by George Strickland and
his own fielding boner in the third.
Al Lopez paraded Art Houtte-
man, Ray Narleski and Don Mossi
to the hill in a vain attempt to
stem the tide. Actually the dam-
age had been done before Garcia
bowed out at the end of three,
trailing 4-0.
The last "four straight" series

WILLIE MAYS
. . starts hitting

Third Giant Step

NEW YORK
AB R7
Lockman, 1b ...4 1
Dark, ss ...... 4 0
Mueller, rf ... 5 2
Mays, of....... 5 1
Thompson, 3b . 3 2
Irvin, If ....... 1 0
a-Rhodes, if .. 3 0
Williams, 2b .. 2 0
Westrum, c ... 4 0
Gomez, p ..... 4 0
Wilhelm ...... 0 0

(N)
HO
113
1 2
2 0
3 2
1 0
0 0
1 3
0 2
1 4
0 1
0 0

A
0
2
0
0
3
0
0
5
0
2
0

E
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Totals ......35 6 102712 1
CLEVELAND (A)

AB
Smith, if ..... 3
Avild 2b ...... 2
Doby, cf ...... 4
Wertz, 1b ..... 4
Majeski, 3b ... 4
Philley, rf......3
Strickland, ss . 3
f-Pope........1
Hegan, a .... 2
d-Glynn ...... 1
Naragon, c .... 0
Garcia, p ..... 0
b-Lemon ......1
Houtteman, p . 0
c-Regalado ... 1
Narleski, p .... 0
e-Mitchell .... 1
Mossi, p ...... 0

R'
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

H
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
4
2
6
2
1
3
0
8
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

A'
0
1
0
1
1
0
4
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

was in 1950 when the Yanks
blitzed the Philadelphia Phillies.
The Giants did it once in 1922
against the Yanks although that
set also included a tie game.
Lockman Singles First Pitch
Whitey Lockman _.slammed Gar-
cia's first pitch to right field for
a single to open the game. After
Al Dark struck out, the Indians
had their first bit of fielding trou-
ble.
Mueller hit a hopper to Bobby
Avila who forced Lockman with a
peg to George Strickland. Trying
for the double play, Strickland's
poor throw got away from Wertz.
It was scored as an error for the
shortstop, letting Mueller go all the
way to second.
Mays scored Muener pronto with
his first hit, a single to right that
Dave Philley let bounce off his
glove and chest. If he had fielded
it cleanly he might have had a play
on Mueller at home.
Dark Singles
Once again the Giants went after
the first ball in the third. Dark
lofted a single into short center
field that Doby couldn't reach and
Mueller slapped a hit-and-run sin-
gle through the shortstop hole va-
cated by Strickland who was mov-
ing toward second.
Dark was trapped and run down
on Mays' tap but he delayed the
killing long enough to let Mueller
reach third and Mays get to sec-
ond. Lopez' strategy called for an
intentional pass to Thompson.
Then off the bench came Mr.
Rhodes, that row - boned slugger
from the Alabama farm country.
He drove Garcia's first offering
to right and Mueller and Mays

scored. It was the third straight
time Rhodes had batted for Monte
Irvin and the third time he con-
nected.
Bad Throw By Garcia
With Thompson on third base,
the squeeze was on and Williams
bunted to the mound. Garcia had
no chance to get Thompson but he
could have had Williams at first.
He hesitated, undecided whether to
throw to Wertz or Avila covering
the bag. When he made up his
mind his throw was poor. The
crowd groaned.
It was so bad that when Garcia
did field Wes Westrum's easy tap
to the box and threw him out, the
crowd cheered in derision.
Whitey Lockman hit Garcia's first
pitch for a single, but Mueller
forced him at second. Trying to
double Mueller, shortstop George
Strickland made a wild throw to
first that got past Vic Wertz and
Mueller got to second base on the
error.
Giants Load Bases
Setting the stage for Rhodes'
third straight pinch hit, Al Dark
opened the Giants' third with a
single and raced to third when
Mueller drilled a hit through the
shortstop hole on a hit-and-run
play. Dark was run down on Mays'
bounder to third, but the runners
moved .up and Thompson was
passed to fill the bases.
That was when Manager Leo
Durocher decided to call on his
ace on the bench for the third
time and Rhodes responded with
a single on the first pitch. The
shaken Indians yielded another run
in that inning when the Giants
tried a squeeze play and Davey
Williams' bunt not only scored
Thompson, but Davey reached first
as Garcia hesitated after fielding
the ball, then threw high to first
for an error.
Art Houtteman replaced Gar-
cia at the start of the fourth. New
York got to him for a run in the
fifth on Thompson's double, an in-
tentional pass to Rhodes, a force-
out and Wes Westrum's single.
Mays Gets RBI
The sixth Giant run was scored
in the sixth off Ray Narleski, who
took over in that inning. A walk
to Lockman, Al Dark's sacrifice
and Mays' single did the trick.

Wings Meet
All-Stars in
Puck Clash
DETROIT (M)-The hockey season
arrives tonight when the champion
Red Wings clash with the Nation-
al Hockey League all-stars in
Olympia Stadium.
The all-star team is composed
of the top players from the other
five teams in the NHL. Heading the
imposing list is a five-man con-
tingent from the Montreal Cana-
diens.
The Red Wings, who won the
NHL title and Stanley Cup cham-
pionship last season, will present
two new faces-Coach Jimmy Skin-
ner and Right Winger Don Poile.
Skinner became coach of the Red
Wings when Tommy Ivan moved.
on to Chicago, where he was named
general manager of the Black
Hawks. Poile is the younger broth-
er of Bud Poile, a former player
in the NHL and currently a coach
for the Red Wings' farm in Edmon-
ton.
There have been seven previous
all-star gamem. In 1950, the Red
Wings piled up an impressive 7-1
victory. That was the only time the
all-star team was beaten.
Veterans Play
Only two players have played in
all seven all-star games - Left
Winger Ted Lindsay of the Red
Wings and Maurice (Rocket) Rich-
ard, explosive right winger of the
Montreal Canadiens.
Other Canadiens on the team are
Defenseman Doug Harvey and For-
wards Jean Beliveau, Bernie Geof-
frion and Kenny Mosdell.
The all-star team, coached by
King Clancy of Toronto, will have
two goalies-Harry Lumley of Tot-
onto and Al Rollins of Chicago.
Lumley won the Vezina trophy last
year for allowing the fewest goals,
while Rollins was named the "Most
Valuable Player" in the league,
even though he played with a last
place team.
Lumley and Rollins are expected
to play 30 minutes apiece.
The rest of the all star team:
Defense-Tim Horton (Toron-
to), Bill Gadsby (Chicago), Gus
Mortson (Chicago), Harry How-
ell (New York), Warren God-
frey (Boston).
Forwards-Ted Kennedy (Tor-
onto), Paul Ronty (New York),
Ed La Prade (New York), Ed
Sandford (New York), Sid Smith
(Toronto), Doug Mohns (Boston)
and Fleming Mackell (Boston).
The Red Wings will rely on their
potent first' line of Gordie Howe,
Lindsay and Alex Delvecchio for
most of their offensive strength.
Delvecchio will play center.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASS!IIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-GLASSES, black plastic frames
in leather case. Call NO 3-1195. )9A
FOR SALE
1941 CHEVROLET, 2 door, radio and
heater, new rubber tires, one owner.
The big lot across from the car
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. - )51B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Kodak reflex camera with f 3.5
lens, including case $65.
Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 South
University. )11B
1932 FORD MODEL B, 4 door, new rub-
ber tires, heater and radio. The big
lot across from the car port. Huron
Motor Sales. 22 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )50B
GRAD STUDENT WISHES to sell 1948
Hudson, 4 door, radio and heater,
good mechanical condition. $200. Call
HI 9-7363 after 6 p.m. )48B
For the Bestes
See Herb Estes
1946 Dodge, 4 door, nice con-
dition.................$295
1947aFord, 4 door, radio and
heater ................. $295
1949 Chevrolet Station Wagon.
.$595
1948 Nash, 4 door ,nice shape.
...........................$295
Every used car backed by a 6-months
warranty. Oil change and grease
job with every purchase. Open
evenings.

FOR SALE

1948 PLYMOUTH CLUB COUPE. Green.
Real clean car. See Smitty. Huron
Motor Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )13B
STANDARD PICA typewriter. Good con-
dition. Reasonable, 830 S. Main. )21B
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-School year; furnished two
bedroom home. 8629 Pleasant Drive,
Winans Lake,' Brighton. Phone week-
ends, Academy 9-3377. Other times,
Lincoln 3-1634, Royal Oak, Mich. )80
GRAD STUDENT wants room-mate:
Basement apt., private entrance,
share $65 rent. See Ray Kramer, 610
E. Ann, 6-7 p.m. )7C
CAMPUS APT. for four men. Furnish-
ed two bedroom apt. $140. Inquire
518 E. William. NO 3-8454. )3C
ROOMS FOR RENT
GRADUATE WOMAN wanted to share
apartment with two other women.
Call NO 3-1416 after 6 p.m. )7D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now at the Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State St.) Ph. NO 3-8454. )3D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now. Student Room
Bureau. No fee charged. NO 3-8454. )4D
HELP WANTED
DIRECT SALESMEN
Michigan's largest manufacturer of
waterconditioning equipment is
establishing a factory branch in the
Ann Arbor area. Three men are re-
quired at present excellent earnings
and advancement opportunities for
men with the following qualifica-
tions: (1 Must be above average in-
telligence with good moral character;
2) Must be 24 years old, prefer mar-
ried man with responsibilities; 3)
Must be able to manage himself with
respect to time and work, University
students will be considered if suffi-
cient time can be devoted to make
it practical. The company will pro-
vide the necessary training. Men will
be trained at the Flint, Jackson, or
Lansing branches. Call NO 8-6007 for
appointment. )4H
ROOM AND BOARD
HOME COOKING for men. Well bal-
anced meals. Rebates. 1319 Hill St.
Call NO 2-6422. )4E

'ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD -MEN IN Southeast campus
area. Try us for the best home-cooked
meals in town! All three, meals or
any combination. Liberal board cred-
it arrangement. Breakfast 30c, lunch
60c, dinner $1.20, Sunday dinner $1.25.
1617 Washtenaw, for info call NO
3-5806, ask for house manager. )3E
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Spec-'
ialize in winter cottons and blouses.
)8I
RAD I O-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service -- Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
11 blocks east of East Eng. )481
DR. KENNETH N. WESTERMAN, re-
search member of the National As-
sociation of Teacher's of Singing,
author of "Emergent Voice," class
and private lessons in singing and
speaking. Studio, 715 Granger. Phone
NO 8-6584. )31

TON IGHT
WEST POINT WHIRL
Featuring
RED JOHNSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
9-12 P.M. $1.50 Per Couple
in the UNION BALLROOM

STUDENTS! CONTINUE YOUR PIANO
study at college under experienced
teachers. Practice facilities avail-
able. THE ROBERT IJUMM STUDIOS
Phone NO 2-3541. I2
DO YOU WANT a new dress made, al-
terations, or hems. turned up? Call
NO 3-0783. )2I
MISCELLANEOUS
WE'RE STAYING OPEN today to handle
your mag business. Order your %
price subscriptions to Time, Life,
Newsweek, etc. now. Student Per-
iodical, NO 2-3061; days, eves. Pay
later.- -)7L
PLAN NOW FOR SUMMER '55.-Eur-
ope, $399, 30-day, 4,500-mile by pri-
vate car. One year free travel in-
surance. Everv 5th tour member gets
free land tour worth $250. Write
TEMPLEMAN TOURS, 337 W. Mason,
Jackson, Michigan. )5G
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS-Have you a skirt you
would like shortened? Other altera-
tions. Call NO 2-2678. A. Grazes. )IN

BUSINESS SERVICES

503 E. Huron

NO 2-3261

Herb Estes,

Inc.
)45B

Totals ......30 2 42710 2

TO LEAD BENGALS:
Harris Signs One-Year
Pact To Manage Tigers

New York (N)
Cle eland (A)

103 011 000-6
000 000 110-2

1954 CHEVROLET, USED, very low mile-
age. Call George, NO 2-7293. )43B
THOR WASHER, semi-automatic, good
condition, $55. Call after 5:30 p.m.
NO 2-5703. )44B
MUST SELL-Two Hollywood beds, Sim-
mons box spring and mattresses, two
years old, good condition. 1013 Arbon-
dale, Atp. 2, NO 2-4661. )37B
1947 DODGE SEDAN, radio, heater,
sharp condition. Only $275. Fitzger-
ald-Jordan. 607 Detroit. Phone NO
8-8141. )41B
LANGUAGE COURSES, half price. Lin-
gua-phone, German; Holt LP, Ger-
man; Holt LP French. $25 each. NO
}3-3945. )35B
1951 KAISER four door. Blue, radio,
heater, hydromatic, new tires, the big
lot across from downtown carport.
Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Washing-
ton. NO 2-4588. )31B
1947 DODGE CLUB COUPE, radio,
heater, new rubber tires. The big lot
across from down to ,fn cisrport. Huron
Motor Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )34B
1951 CHEVROLET two door, radio and
heater. Beige color, one owner, real
clean. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales. 222
W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )32B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B

ORPHEUM
TODAY and SUNDAY
A POIGNANT TENDER
ROMANCE!

Daily
Classifieds
Bring
Quick
Results

Roiicki-il
Rowdy,!
Irresistible!
It's I
t' Everybody's
Choice!
a Q~k L u~~
Choice'

.

Top Off Your Evenings
at the
MILK MAID DRIVE-IN
RESTAURANT
Open 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
3730 Washtenaw Near Pittsfield Village
ORDERS TO GO - NO 8-7146

! '

' !

First All-Campus Dance
TOMMY AQUINO Orchestra
Ann Arbor ALLEYCATS
At the League Ballroom
October 9th 9-1
$2.50 per Couple
Favors by Faberge'
1001 Nights

DETROIT (R - Quiet, easy-going
Bucky Harris Friday was given
the delicate task of guiding the
Detroit Tigers' "youth movement."
Harris-often called the "ball-
player's manager" because of his
mild-mannered ways-was named
manager of the Tigers for 1955.
He accepted a one-year contract
to succeed Fred Hutchinson, who
resigned Thursday after turning
down a similar offer.
In Majors 27 Years
The 58-year-old Harris, who has
been a big league manager 27
years, was fired as manager of
the Washington Senators last week.
He had managed the Tigers from
1929 to 1933, never finishing higher
than fifth place.
"Harris was my first choice be-
cause of his ability to handle young
players," said Walter Briggs Jr.,
president of the Tigers.
"That was the main considera-
tion."
Harris agreed to terms in a long
distance phone call from Washing-
ton.
Accent on Youth
With a strong accent on youth,
the Tigers have risen from the
black depths of 1952, when the
team finished in last place for the
first and only time in history.
Today thru Sunday

Under Hutchinson, the Tigers
climbed to sixthiplace last year
and fifth place this year
Harris has managed Washington
three times. He led the Senators
to the American League pennant
in his first two years in 1924-25.
Led Yanks to Flag
Harris' other peak year was
1947, when he led the New York
Yankees to the pennant and a vic-
tory in the World Series. But when
he finished a close third the fol-
lowing year, he was fired.
A native of Port Jervis, N.Y.,
Harris also managed the Boston
Red Sox (1934) and Philadelphia
Phillies (1943) for a year apiece.

-AXE
RADIO DISPATCHED
VETERAN'S CAB
N0 2-4477

1946 HUDSON four door, radio an
heater. $100. 1946 Chrysler, radi
heater, fluid drive. $1.50. Fitzgeral
Jordan. 607 Detroit. NO 8-8141. )17

B " AHIUS GORING
*OHiN BAMLY CUM tMANNHEIM
t+ iw.dhrh~llt iSI~~t ~ u10 ...,Q~
}1txd (Orf h i~ttt R~ flAgtt Y1C

EXTRAY
"FUDGET'S
BUDGET" Shows
Ne ... 'A. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
SNew U.P.A. Matinees 50c
Cartoon Eves. & Sun. 75e

k.
C

FRNKSIATA -n CLFEDMICNOC'

CARTOON - NEWS

FRANK SINATRA in
"SUDDENLY"

ALFRED HITCHCOCKS
"REAR WINDOW"

I

U

24 Hours Service

We Go Anywhere

YOUR BEST BET-CALL A YET

ROBERTA PETERS
Metropolitan Opera Star
MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 8:30 P.M.
Hill Auditorium

I

kd a a4 T ERR I ! '

I

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Liii

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1

BLAZING EXCITEMENT
AND ADVENTURE!
The year s most
thrilling romance
with 3 great stars!

M-G-M presents
MEN -
O'FTH'iz
FIGHTING
VAN JOHNSON

Cinemr SL quild
"THE DESERT FOX"
JAMES MASON
CronIC HARDWICKF

TICKETS for
Either Concert
$1.50 - $2.00
$2.50 - $3.00
ON SALE AT
Burton Tower
University Musical
Society

.

He knew what she was NOW

I / : >;

I

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- - ------- -

amm

* ir s' a ~ -

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