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October 02, 1954 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-02

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_.'PAGE FOVS

THE MICMGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1954 .

FAGE FOUR THE 1~flCIIIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2,1954
S S _______________________________________________ S

LIAISON AGENCY:
School Services Bureau
Aids Resident Students

By DAVID LEVY
Whether they know it or not, ap-
proximately 12,000 University. stu-
dents graduated from Michigan
secondary schools have been aided
by the Bureau of School Services.
Functioning as a liaison agency
between the University and their
schools, this organization serves
state residents in various areas.
School Programs
Eighty per cent of the Universi-
ty's Audio-Visual Education Cen-
ter's films are for schools. The Bu-
reau of Psychological . Services
sponsors the Michigan School Test-
ing Program. The Library Exten-
sion Service offers consultation for
school libraries. The Speech De-
partment leads a Forensic Pro-
gram which facilitates debate and
spring speech activities.
The Department of Journalism
works in the Consultant Service
For School Publications assisting
schools with their publication prob-
lems, in high school journalism
courses, and in public relations.
Yearly Conferences
The Bureau holds several inter-
est clinics yearly for high school
students. Cheerleader's clinics and
conferences for citzenship leaders
serve as initial visits to Ann Arbor
for many.
The program .of accrediting sec-
ondary schools, a project begun in
1871, is controlled by the Bureau.
For the 1953-54 'school year there
were 642 schools accredited, rep-
resenting the largest number of ac-
credited schools during the pro-
gram's eighty-two years.
Show To Begin
With Reception
Opening the L. H. Scott exhibit
of art objects from Iron Curtain
countries, a reception will-be held
at 8 p.m. today in the West Gal-
lery of the Rackham Bldg.
Scott, art editor of Gargoyle,
gathered the articles by writing to
the countries or their embassies.
The exhibit will be open to the
public every evening from 8 to 10
p.m. until Oct. 10.
SL Cinema Guild
"The Desert Fox," based on the
experiences of German Field Mar-
shall Erwin Rommel and starring
James Mason, Cedric Hardwicke,
and Jessica Tandy, will be shown
by the Student Legislature Cinema
Guild today at 7 and 9 p.m. and
tomorrow at 8 p.m. in Architec-
ture Aud.
Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

Approximately 80 schools were
refused accreditation. All schools
dropped from the accredited list
were given a year's advance warn-
ing before being placed on the ten-
tative list.
The establishment of the Bureau
was authorized by the Board of
Regents in May, 1948. It replaced
the Bureau of Co-operation with
Educational Institutions which had
been operating since 1932.
The new Bureau was organized
as a channel through which the
University could co-ordinate serv-
ices rendered to schools through
University agencies. Mr. James A.
Lewis, Vice-President for Student
Affairs, as Director, is the Bu-
reau's administrative supervisor.
Met Sops-rano
Starts Series
Roberta Peters, Metropolitan
Opera coloratura soprano, will op-
en this season's Choral Union Ser-
ies at 8:30 p.m. Monday in Hill
Auditorium.
Currently in her fifth season at
the Met, she has appeared in num-
erous operas including "Don Gio-
vanni, "Cosi Fan Tutte," "Gianni
Schicchi" and "Rigoletto."
It was as Zerlina in "Don Gio-
vanni" that Miss Peters made her
debut on a moment's notice in
Nov. 1950, being rushed in as a
last-minute replacement for an
indisposed prima donna.
Her program Monday tvill in-
clude works by Bach, Scarlatti,
Strauss, Debussy, Chausson and
Barber.
Tickets priced at $3.00, $2.50,
$2.00 and $1.50 are still available
at the University Musical Society
offices in Burton Tower.

1Beethoven's
String Cycle
In Concert
Tomorrow's performance of the
Stanley Quartet in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall will constitute a "first"
for this area's music lovers.
It will be the first Michigan
concert in .hich Beethoven's
Complete String Quartet Cycle
will be performed. The Sunday af-
ternoon concerts, scheduled at
3:30 p.m. in Rackham Lecture
Hall, are planned for Oct. 17, Nov.
7 and 21, Dec. 12 and Jan. 9.
"These works represent one of
the most monumental contribu-
tions in the history of music," ac-
cording to the Quartet's first vi-
olinist, Prof. Gilbert Ross of the
Music School.
"Their qualities with odd move-
ments and changes of pace have
made them problematic works for
many generations," Prof. Ross
commented.
The cycle will not be played in
chronological order. The indivi-
dual concerts will represent a
quartet from each of the three
periods of Beethoven's creative
career.
Five Years Existence
In the five years of its existence,
the Stanley Quartet has presented
44 public . concerts in Rackham
Lecture Hall and over forty in
other Michigan communities.
This year's performances of the
Beethoven Cycle will also be per-
formed in Detroit under the aus-
pices of the Detroit Extension
Center on the Friday before each
Ann Arbor concert.
Members of the Quartet are:
Gilbert Ross and Emil Raab, vi-
olinists; Oliver Edel, cellist; and
Robert Courte, viola.
The Quartet has played many
concerts at the Library of Con-
gress in Washington, D.C., in Cle-
veland and Charleston, and at
many Eastern and Midwestern
colleges and universities.

Competition?
CORVALLIS, Ore. (MP-Paul
X. Knoll, professor of speech at
Oregon State College, reported
that his wife has enrolled as a
student in his class in argu-
mentation,
Crucial Issue
Of Unification
Left Unsolved
(Continued from Page1)
make Germany a military power.
Then an uncontrollable and remil-
itarized Germany might launch an
attack on the Soviet in an attempt
to regain East Germany, thereby
plunging the world into war.
This, Prof. Wit said, is the basic
fear behind the French position.
This also returns the problem to
the question of German unifica-
tion. As Prof. Efimenco noted, al-
though the London conference
should result in a compromise al-
lowing Germany to rearm under
some system of controls, "the Ger-
man question would be only half-
solved. The problem of German re-
unification would not be solved,
which is the more pressing issue
in the minds of the West Ger-
mans."
Of course, German rearmament
would mean that Germany is re-
gaining a strong position in Europe,
he said, and "imply that Germany
would be in a stronger position to
negotiate with Moscow on East
Germany."
The question of German unifica-
tion, however, depends consider-
ably on Moscow's position and how
far West Germany would be willing
to compromise, he added.

Awards Go
To Students
Virginia Voss, '54, and Richard
Balzhiser, '55E, were awarded ci-
tations of honor at ,yesterday's
banquet meeting of the Advisory
Chairmen to the Development
Councif'
Balzhiser and Miss Voss served
as student members to the Devel-
opmnent Council last year, The
two student members for the cur-
rent school year have not yet been
appointed.
The Student Legislature Cabi-
net has recommended Eugene
Hartwig, '55, and Ruth Rossner,
'55, with Lucy Landers, '55, as al-
ternative to the student positions.
Next step is for the recommenda-
tions to be passed on by the Stu-
dent Affairs Committee and ap-
proved by President Harlan H.
Hatcher.
Advisory Chairmen, appointedI
in alumni centers throughout the
country, will continue their first
annual conference today and to-
morrow. The Board of Directors,
presided over by Earl H. Cress,
will meet today.
Miehi gamua
The Daily wishes to correct a
misstatement which appeared in
yesterday's paper in an account of
the origins and history of Michi-
gamua.
Founded in 1902, Michigamua,
all-campus men's honorary, has
honored with membership each
year's leaders in activities and
athletics.
It has never been a drinking so-
ciety and was not threatened with
extinction during the 1920's.

4

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THIRTY-TWO AVAILABLE:
Diamond Fortune Provides
Funds for Rhodes Scholars

. By MARGE PIERCY
It was fifty years ago that the
first American Rhodes scholars
arrived in Oxford, benefactors of a
South African diamond magnate.
Established by Cecil Rhodes in
his will, the scholarships are paid
out of the fortune the energetic
Rhodes made in a half century of
turbulent finances. Sent to Natal
for his health as a young man,
Rhodes mined a.fortune in the dia-
mond fields, and had Rhodesia
named after him after he became
Prime Minister of Cape Colony.
Active Career
In an energetic career, he tried
to overthrow the South African Re-
public, was beseiged in the Boer
War and sent the railway and tele-
graph through Africa.
"The last thing I want is abook-
worm," Rhodes said in setting up
his four point basis of selection for
candidates. Eliminating all racial,
religious, or political qualifica-
tions, students are chosen for schol-
arship, character, moral force and
leadership and physical vigor as
exhibited in sports.

Thirty-two of the scholarships.
more than half, go each year to'
American students. This heavy rep-
resentation was due to Rhodes' be-
lief- that the future of the United
States and Britain lay in greater
cooperation. He dreamed of "the
union of the English-speaking peo-
ples throughout the world."
Scholarship Eligibility
In order to be eligible for appli-,
cation, a candidate must be an un-
married male citizen who will be
between 19 and 25 on October 1,
1955, with at least five years' resi-
dence. He has to have completed
at least his sophomore year when:
he makes his application and re-
ceive official endorsement from his
university.
A candidate who has had active
service can deduct that time from
his age in order to qualify. The
scholarship is awarded for two
years with a possible third year,
and there are no restrictions on
the course of study.
Information and applications can
be obtained from Prof. Clark Hop-
kins, of the classical art and ar-
cheology department at Rm. 2011
Angell Hall. A meeting will be held
for candidate" at 4:15 p.m. Thurs-
day in Rm. 2013 Angell Hall. Ap-
plications should be returned be-
fore October 15.

Army c an
Navy Grey
Forest Green
ALL SIZESf
or we will alter T T 5-1
to fit at LABE-
no extra cost.

11

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FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Sunday Morning Service
Oct. 3-Unreality
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday: Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday
evenings from 7 to 9 p.m. and Sunday after-
noons from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M., Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00-1:30 P.M.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHUIRCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga andGeorge Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Eduard Sue, University
Pastors
9:15 A.M.-Breakfast Discussion, Gospel of Mark
9:15 and 11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship: "World
Wide Communion
6:45 P.M.-Guild Meeting: "Toward a Place
Among Peers" in a series "The Shaking of the
Foundations." Rev. Charles Lebdr will be the
speaker.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
Father McPhillip
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12:00
Daily-7:00 - 8:00 - 9:00
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall'
11:00 A.M.-Sundays. Visitors welcome.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Asst. Student Counselor
Sunday-
9:45-Roger Williams Class-Guild House. Study
of Glatans
11:00--Church Worship. Sermon Topic-"Christ-
ian Love"
6:45-Roger Williams Guild Meeting. "Christ-
ian's Responsibility in a University" given by
a student panel.
Wednesday-
4:30 - 5:30-"Midweek Chat" in Guild House
Thursday-
7:00 A.M-Morning Worship of "Yoke Fe-
lowsh ip"
Friday-
Guild will meet at the church to attend pep rally
together then return to Guild House for rec-
reation and refreshment.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45-"Can You Do Without .. .?" Dr. Parr will
deliver the sermon.
7:00 P.M.-Student Guild will meet in the May-
flower Room. Mr. Melvin Marcus, Grad stu-
dent and authority on the United Nations, will
present "You and the United Nations."
EVANGELICAL UNITED BRETHREN
CHURCH
Broadway at Plymouth Rd.
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship

7:30 P.M.--Evening Service
R. L. Lewis, Minister, Phone NO 3-4061
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph. NO 8-7421

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship: "Why Am I
Here?" Dr. Abbey, preaching.
9:30 A.M.-Student Seminar, Topic: "Major
Methodist Beliefs."
10:30 A.M.-Student Seminar, Topic: "Great
Ideas of the Bible,"
5:30-Supper and Fellowship
6:45-Worship and Program. Dr. Kenneth Jone
will speak on "Individual Christian Committ
ment."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open
daily.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday, 4:30 to 6: OPEN HOUSE after the game.
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Two Worship Op-
portunities, with the pastor preaching on "An
Inheritance Incorruptible."
(Communion in both services)
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper. Program at 7:00, showing of
30 minute sound-color religious movie, "Voice
of the Deep."
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:00 A.M.-Matins Service
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study of the Parables
11:00 A.M.-Worship Service
7:00 P.M.-Speaker-Mr. James Keisler, U-M
Instructor, "Why Do We Have Creeds?"
Tuesday-7:15-8:15 P.M.-Discussion Series led
by Dr. George Mendenhall, Dept. of Near East
Studies-"From the Bible to Our Day."
THE FIRST UNITARIAN
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Bailey, Advisor to Students
Mrs. Fay A. Kincaid, Director of Religious
Education
Miss Betsy Gidley, Organist
10 A.M.-Untiarian Adult Group-"Humanist
Thought To-day."
11 A.M.-Services with Sermon: Part I of "The
Meaning of Candor" by Rev. Edward H. Red-
man.
7:30 P.M-Unitarian Student Group meets at
the church with transport from Lne Hall-
"Why We Become Unitarians."
7:30 P.M.-Unitarian Youth Fellowship meets
at home of Mr. and Mrs. Bailey, 1111 White
St. Mr. Dewitt Baldwin, speaker. Transport
from Michigan League Main Desk.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone NO 2-1121
Wi. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00-Sunday School
11:00-Mr. Michael Guido
6:00-Student Guild
7:30-Mr. Michael Guido
Wednesday 7:30-Prayer Meeting
These are the concluding meetings with the Guidos.
Don't miss them.
We extend a cordial welcome.
FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Corner Lawrence and Thayer
Phone NO 3-2139
Rev. Herbert Nation, Minister
Phone NO 2-5361 -'
9:45 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship. Sermon: "Will a
Man Love God?"
7:00 P.M.-Young People's Meeting
7:45 P.M.-Evangelistic Service. R. L. Webster,
speaker.
Wednesday, 7:45 P.M.-Prayer Meeting
A hearty welcome is extended to all students.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45-Morning Worship. Sermon: "The Begin-
ning of the End."
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.-Church School

1

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MICHIGAN UNION
DINING ROOM
SATURDAY
Breakfast. ..... .7:30 A.M. - 9:30 P.M.
Lunch. .......... 1.:30 A.M. - 1:30 P.M.
Dinner. ... ...... .5:30 P.M. - 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY
Breakfast..... .8:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.
Dinner. ....... .12:30 A.M. - 2:30 P.M.

ANN ARBOR CLOTHING'
113 SOUTH MAIN
- ~ ~ 1~ - --- -- --- -

Il

IS.

11

V R IIN
AT WHOLESALE
Locally Grown by U. of M. Employe
Yews, Arborvitae, etc. both spreading and upright

11

Junipers,

l'

!iI

*

T # r it r yt

TH AANN ARBOR BANK
offers you a plan to
BANK BY MAlt
Be sure to inquire about this plan:
SAVE TIME and MONEY

11

I1

See Michael Lee and Samples at 1422 Washington Hts.
NO 8-8574
-_ _ _ _ _ _ - -_- -
-~G S ---
sEsC 7 kskS
Ii II8

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