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May 20, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE F1E

THRSAY MY 0, 194TEIIC IGA AL AE7

I I II Igr1r

Bluebook Bal

I

To Be Given
On Saturday
Annual Union Dance
Will Feature Music
By Paul McDonough
That "blue" feeling that comes
to students facing final exams will
be' dispelled temporarily by the
Union's semi-annual Bluebook
Y Ball, which will be 'held from 9
p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday in the
Union Ballroom.
The dance, which is becoming
an end-of-the-semester tradition,
will feature the music of Paul Mc-
Donough and his Orchestra to
"soothe" exam-worried students.
Bluebooks will provide the cen-
tral theme for decorations at the
ball. A large one will be set up in
the center of the ballroom for
couples to autograph. Smaller rep-
licas of bluebooks will cover the
walls, while a false ceiling of blue
and white will add a colorful touch
to the scene.
In the hallway outside the ball-
room there will be large blacle-
boards equipped with chalk and
erasers.
Heresambitious students will be
able to work out a last-minute
formula or just plain doodle as the
case may be.
Miniature bluebooks will be used
as programs and will provide space
for couples to rate each other with
the letter grade of their choice.
Tickets for the dance are priced
at $1.50 per couple and may be
1 purchased at the main desk of the
Union before the dance.
General chairman of the Blue-
book Ball is Harvey Rutstein. Aid-
ing him are Ron Ritzler, entertain-
ment; Don Seltz, programs, and
Paul Mundinger, publicity.
WORK AND FUN:

-Daily-Dean Morton
BLUEBOOK BLUES-Matilda McCarthy dreams pensively of the
Bluebook Ball, the Union's semi-annual dance, to be presented
from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday. The ball is held to calm those
final exam jitters students are experiencing.
Campus Religious Groups
To Hold Banquets,_Picnics
r.______________________________

Panhel Ball
Heads Told
Association Reveals
Next Year's Chairmen
Panhellenic Association has
named Peggy Hubbard of Alpha
Chi Omega as general chairman of!
the next annual Panhellenic Ball.
Assisting her will be Cynthia
Krans, assistant general chairman;
Alpha Xi Delta; Mary Cross, pub-
licity chairman, Delta Gamma;
Dorothy McElroy, assistant pub-
licity chairman, Alpha Delta Pi;
Jane Kohr, decorations chairman,1
Delta Delta Delta and Dorothy
Ham, assistant decorations chair-
man, Alpha Omicron Pi.
Other chairmen include Ruth
Cohen, programs and patrons
chairman, Collegiate Sororis; B. J.
Thompson, ticket chairman, Kap-
pa Kappa Gamma, and Sally Mil-
ler, assistant ticket chairman, Del-
ta Gamma.
The Panhel Ball is an annual
dance dating back many years on
campus. In the years before 1945,
Panhel Ball was sponsored jointly
by both Panhellenic and Assembly.
Because of the difficulty in holding
the large dance together they de-
cided to separate their dances in
1946.
"Open Sesame," the 1946 Panhel
Ball, was held in the Fall. In 1947
a grecian theme was used, com-
plete with pillars and the Parthe-
non. The name was "Elysian Eve"
and Stan Kenton supplied the mu-
sic for the dance, which was held
in the IM Building.
QUALITY SERVICE
AT MODERATE COSTS
Radios
Phonographs
Television
The TV Studio
1317 South University
1
TELEVISION NIGHTLY
Stop Here for
LUNCH
Genuine Italian
SPAGHETTI
with
Salad, Rolls, and Coffee 75c
"Give your taste a treat"
at
LA CASA
Phone NO 8-8916
122 W. Washington

Variety

lars

Banquets and picnics honoringv
graduating seniors and returning
alumni will highlight the weekend
festivities of the religious groups
on campus.
Saturday evening at the Con-
gregational Church the Congrega-
tional and Disciples Guild will hold
its annual reunion banquet for
present Guilders and for 50 alumni
members returning from five

Exhib it

Resorts Provide Positions
For Students in Summer

states. Messages will be read from
alumni throughout the world.
The program for the evening
will include a talent show, after
which a worship service and in-
stallation of officers will take place
in the sanctuary.
The Canterbury Club of the
Episcopal Church will present Rev.
Wilbur Schutze speaking on "Sex
and Christianity" at 7:30 p.m. to-
morrow at Canterbury House.
BANQUET PLANNED
Tomorrow, members of the Wes-
leyan Guild of the Methodist
Church will hold their Senior Ban-
quet followed by a play produced
by the drama workshop of the
Guild.
The Lutheran Student Associa-
tion and Gamma Delta, the Luth-
eran Student Association of the
University Lutheran Chapel, will
hold their respective banquets hon-
oring seniors on Sunday.
On the agenda of the Roger
Williams Guild of the Baptist
Church for this weekend is the
annual Installation Banquet at
6:15 p.m. tomorrow and the pic-
nic honoring graduating seniors at
6 p.m. Sunday.
Reservations must be in today
for the Hillel bridge tournament.
Contact Sue Altschul, 483 Jordan,
for reservations.
The Newman Club will hold its
weekly open house from 9 p.m. to
midnight tomorrow at the Father
Richard Center.

A wide variety of representative
fields marks the student works
now on view at the annual School
of Architecture and Design exhi-
bition in the Museum of Art,
Alumni Hall.
Ranging from elementary to
the more advanced technical
works, the show is divided into
many sections in the fields related
to architecture and design.
* * *
THE ART WORKS begin with
basic design and drawing and ad-
vance to life drawing and oil
painting in order around the gal-
lery.
Scattered throughout the
room are assorted statues and
sculptures of both conservative
and modern types. Included in
the exhibit are four examples
of modern, simple furniture:
two chairs, a coffee table and
a floor lamp.
In the architectural half of the
show are views as to visual fund-
amentals in two and three dimen-
sions; spatial dynamics through
transparency, reflection, pattern,
value, and color; and a variety of
designs for the house of the fu-
ture.
Prints for landscaping, city
planning, and structural designs
adorn the walls of the exhibition
rooms, with some examples, in
miniature, of these ideas-in-print.
Model backgrounds usually show
elevation, structural observation
and perspective.
* * *
FEATURED here are models of
a proposed plan for the town of
Whitmore and a model of a pro-
posed Fairgrounds youth center.
The exhibit will remain at the
museum until May 26. Alumni
Hall is open from 9 a.m.. to 5 p.m.
weekdays and from 2 to 5 p.m.
Sundays.
DAI LY
PHOTO
FEATU RE
Story by
HARRY STRAUSS
Pictures by
DICK GASKILL

PROPOSED DESIGN OF DOWNTOWN WHITMORE-A BIRD'S EYE VIEW

By MARLENE KELAVOS
Always a popular venture,
throngs of college students will be
headed for resort jobs this sum-
mer.,,
Many students contemplating
such positions for the first time
may be interested in obtaining a
general picture outlined by those
k who have held these jobs in the
past.
Waitress work offers the most
opportunities for coeds. Mary Jean
Monkoski found such a job in a
~hotel at Yellowstone National
Park which provided one of her
most enjoyable summers.
After hours she took full ad-
vantage of all the West had to
offer-swimming, picnicking, hik-
ing and often short trips to nearby
Sun Valley, Idaho, the Grand Te-
tons and Big Horn Mountains.
JOB INCLUDES BONUS
The work totaled about six hours
a day, with one day off a week.
Besides tips, the salary amounted
to $75 a month. A bonus was given
at the end of the season to stu-
dents who remained from the mid-,
dle of June to Labor Day.
Guest privileges of a hotel in
Eagle's Mere, Pepnsylvania were
enjoyed by Betty Lu Morgan, who
worked there as a switchboard op-
erator. Horse back riding, use of
a private lake, dancing and a sum-
mer theater were offered to em-
ployees.
Miss Morgan said the clientele
was comprised largely of Wash-
ington dignitaries. Employees who
were mostly from Eastern schools

received $30 a month in addition
to room and board.
Anne Marie Reichart found an
interestinghand convenient job
right in her own home town of
South Haven, Mich. She was em-
ployed as a children's recreational'
director for a local resort. Fond of'
children, she found the job of or-
ganizing hikes, game and beach
outings very enjoyable, to say
nothing of the $50 a week pay
check.
COEDS AT MACKINAW
University students were well
represented on Mackinaw Island.
Shirley Sikkenga, Beverly Kennon,
and Helen Matekel working as
waitresses found time for sand,
sun and surf, during off hours.
Their salaries amounted to $25 a
week, plus board and tips.
Don Kenny put his musical tal-
ents to work, as a member of a
trio, playing at one of the Mack-
inaw night spots. s
Bob Hoffman worked as a bus
boy at a resort in Estes Park,
Colorado. Paid an hourly wage of
$1.25 an hour, he also received his
room and board. There was time
for dances, beach parties, and
swimming at this spot in the heart
of the Rocky Mts.
Saybrook, Conn. on Long Island
Sound was the place Jay Grant
chose to work one summer, also as
a bus boy. Receiving $23 wages
plus room and board and tips, he
found it a "great" summer spot.

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CAMP COUNSELORS - There
will be a cook-out for the Camp
Counselors Club at 5 p.m. today.
Members are asked to meet at the
WAB and to call Sue Prakken at
NO 3-4400.
SOFTBALL-The winner of the
softball game between Kappa Al-
pha Theta and Betsy Barbour will
play the winner of the game be-
tween Palmer and Martha Cook
I at 5 p.m. today on Palmer Field.
* * *
ASSEMBLY TEA - Assembly
Association will hold a tea honor-
ing all incoming house officers of
independent houses on campus
from 3 to 5 p.m. tomorrow at
Stockwell Hall.
It's time to order
GRADUATION
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