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May 20, 1954 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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PACF .IW'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 1954"I

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JACK OF ALL TRADES:
'Nemo' Becomes Campus Byword

By JOEL BERGER
Through activities ranging from
the Union Opera and Senior Board
to an assortment of honoraries,
the nickname "Nemo" has become
a byword on campus.
Known primarily for his work
with the Opera, Howard N. Ne-
merovski, '54E, possessor of the
nickname, said that his first con-
tact with activities came "when I
polled all of one-sixth of the votes
in an election for the engineering
school sophomore class president."
This didn't worry him too much,
however, as the office was abol-
ished shortly afterwards.
* * *
THAT YEAR "Nemo" began a
two-year stretch on the Engineer-
ing Honor Council. "The honpr
system is one of the things for
which the engineering school can
be justly proud," he commented.
"Working on the council was
one of the best things which ever
happened to me," he now thinks.
"It made me aware of other facets
of University life."
Along with Pete Lardner, '54E,
Jack Ehlers, '54E and Dick Man-
chee, '54E, Nemerovski founded the
Engineering - Steering Committee
and worked on it during his sopho-
more and junior years.
-"This organization was needed
because there wasn't enough com-
Munication between engineering
students and faculty," he said. The
committee in now incorporatedc
into the Engineering Council.
* * *
NOW BEGINNING his second
year as a Union vice-president, thex
Mimes member wrote the last twot
scripts for the Union Opera-"Noc
Cover Charge" in 1952 and "Upa
'N' Atom" in 1953.
These scripts started one of
his main complaints with thec
world, the Michigamua membert
said. "I've become known onc
campus mainly for my work with1
the Opera. However,,some of my
other activities take up a lot of

Bicycles
Ann Arbor police will hold a
bicycle auction at 10 a.m. Sat-
urday in the parking lot next
to City Hall on S. Fifth and
Huron.
Police explained yesterday
that any student whose lost bi-
cycle has been recovered by the
department may claim it by
presenting identification to
prove it is his. Bicycles may be
claimed any day prior to the
auction.
IBlakely Gives
Last Lecture
"In the latter part of the twen-
tieth century we have made an
outstanding success in one re-
spect-the broadening of equality
of opportunity, but we have de-
teriorated, especially recently, in
the protection against abuses of
powers," said Robert J. Blakely in
yesterday's talk on "Mass Com-
munications and the Dignity of
the Individual."
Delivering the last in the series
of lectures sponsored by the journ-
alism department on "The Press
and Civil Liberties in Crises,"
Blakely, Manager of Central Re-
gionaltOffice of the Fund for Adult
Education, went on to warn against
making the mistake of relying on
the past in our interpretations of
civil liberties.

Kresge
'Open

Medical

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vow

for Re:
University President Harlan H.
Hatcher presided over the dedi-
cation of the Kresge Medical Re-
search Building Saturday.
The building was constructed
with funds from a three million
dollar grant from the Kresge
Foundation, the largest grant ever
given by the foundation and the
largest ever received by the Uni-
versity '.Medical School.
* * *
DESIGNED with three purposes
In mind, the building will provide:
facilities for r'esearch in problems
related to medicine, will give tal-
ented men and women training in
research, and will bring medical
theory and medical practice to-
gether.
Research will be carried on
by the medical school faculty
and research projects will be
chosen by them. Treatment of
selected hospital patients will be
given in the building. There will
be a close relationship between
the investigations and research
and the treatment of human di-
sease in the hospital.
The 128 laboratories in the five
level building have been arranged
with flexibility in anticipation of-
future changes in medical science.
In order to meet the needs of sev-

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
HOWARD NEMEROVSKI
. * . man of many activities

my time and have been just as
valuable a contribution to the
campus."
One of these other activities,
Senior Board, is termed a growing
organization now evolving from a
service organization into a rep e-
sentative body by Nemerovski.
"The Board has considered
many serious problems including
the recent student speaking team
discrimination controversy," the
Board vice-chairman said.
NEMEROVSKI at present is the
only fraternity member of the In-
ter-House Council's Operation In-
quiry. The Zeta Beta Tau member
has found this committee's work
"very interesting and beneficial."
"Personally," he continued,

"I feel that an increase in the
number of coeducational living
units would be beneficial, but not
as an inroad into the present
house pWan.

iilding
isearch
eral research projects which are
now under way, special laborator-
ies have been built.
A sound proof laboratory has
been constructed to be used in
investigating speech and hearing
problems. Actually a room within
% room, with a foundation inde-
pendent of the building, this room
is also shielded electrostatically.
* * *
OTHER SPECIAL laboratories
and rooms are the shielded elec-
troencephalography laboratories,
walk-in cold rooms, incubator
rooms, and an isotope laboratory.
The Kresge Building also con-
tains laboratories for the Insti-
tute of Industrial Research
which was established at the
University in 1951 through large
grants from industry.
Air conditioned animal units
have been constructed on the top
level of the building, with a special
kitchen built to prepare the food
for the laboratory animals. Cages
will be washed and sterilized by
a huge cage washing unit.
Research will be in the areas of
physiological acoustics, dermatol-
ogy, toxicology, intestinal diseas-
es, hypertension, cancer, and sur-
gery.
CONSTRUCTION of the build-
ing was begun in 1951, and in
1953, Dr. Merle Lawrence moved
into his physiological acoustics
laboratory.
The Kresge Medical Research
Building is part of the long range
plan for the expansion of the Uni-
versity medical center, which in-
cludes the present Out-Patient.
Clinic and the Women's Hospital.
The first unit of the Children's
Hospital has been started.
Future plans call for an educa-
tional building for instruction in
the basic sciences and a medical
library.
Continued research will be ft-
nanced from grants obtained from
public and private sources. Work
on the various problems will be
reviewed periodically in order to
best utilize laboratory space.
When the laboratories are In
full operation annual research
expenditures will be approxi-
mately $750,000.
From the beginning of the Medi-
cal School, faculty members have
been encouraged to pursue re-
search projects. As the University
has expanded space has become
limited. The Kresge building sup-
plies much needed space for re-
search. Its facilities have been de
signed for this purpose only.

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1

Blakely cited mass communica-
"the oldest honorary on campus, ton d a meanscofire-
Nemerovski is pinned to Jacque- storing individual communications.
line Schif, '54. former presidet
of Alpha Epsilon Phi and formerĀ°
secretary of League interviewing.
"We'll be married sometime in the It
future, although we haven't set;(!
the date yet," he said.
"In the meantime, I have law presents summer
school to look forward to," he formals with
added. "STAIN SHY'
Today, Nemerovski-engineering
senior class president, member of sa.. the miracle
stain resistant
engineering honoraries Vulcans fabric finish!
and Triangles and master of cere- 26.95
monies of Gulantics during the
past two years-sincerely believes
that "my class of 'campus leaders' (
is one of the best to ever come here. MrW L D ~
"Its caliber of people and per- Se Street on the Campus
sonalities may never be equalled," _

KRESGE BUILDING COMPLETES ANOTHER PHASE OF
UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER EXPANSION

I.

Students Choose Officers
In Many CampusElections

..

At a meeting yesterday, thev
Graduate Student Council elected
the following officers: president,
Carl Zimmerman, Grad.; vice-
president, Homer Cooper, Grad.;
and treasurer, John Lovell, Grad.
Other officers will be elected in
September.
The group also moved to recom-
mend to the graduate school that
photographs should not be re-
quired on graduate applications.
The Council approved tht new
constitution of the organization
unanimously.

1

I.

McCreight, '56BAd, and vice-presi-
dent, Cice Coleman, '55.
Out-going President Stan Levy,
'55, was presented with a gold ga-
vel at the meeting of old and new
council members.
NATURAL RESOURCES SCHOOL
Members of the School of Natur-
al Resources recently elected the
following Forester's Club officers:
Mike Myers, '55, president; William
McElfresh, '55, vice-president; Pete
Black, '56, secretary; Rupert Cut-
ler, '55, treasurer; and Jack Cody,
grad., program chairman.
Appointments to the staff of the
1955 Michigan Forester, the natur-
al resources school yearbook, in-
clude Rupert Cutler, editor-in-
chief; Al Weisz, '56, business man-
ager, and Chuck Kelsey, '56, and.
Jim Ward, '55, photographers.

.. .....

I

ENGINEERING HONOR
COUNCIL
Recent elections of the Engineer-
ing Honor Council named -Anne
Campbell, '55E president and Dav-
id Fleisher, '56E, vice-president of
the group.
Newly chosen to fill vacancies in
the nine-member engineering col-
lege judiciary body were Miss
Campbell, Robert Richardson, '55E,
Roger Andersen, '56E and Robert
Ilgenfritz, '56E. New members will
serve for one year on the council.
TAU BETA PI
Roger Maugh, '55E, was elected
president of Tau Beta Pi at a
meeting held last night in the
Union. Others elected were Jere
Brophy, '55E, vice-president; Bill
Weber, '55E, recording secretary;
Lewis Burnham, '55E, correspond-
ing secretary; and Thomas Prop-
son, '55E, cataloguer.
Tau Beta Pi is the national scho-
lastic honor society of the College
of Engineering.
EAST QUAD COUNCIL
East Quad Council met last night
to install its new president, Ron
Objectors State
Warfare Beliefs
Conscientious objectors can ap-
peal for non-participation in any
form of warfare if they are sin-
cere in their objection and can
prove that their normal beliefs
are against warfare.
Reverend Eugene A. Ransom,
Harold S. Gray and Fred Hutch-
ins were panel speakers last night
at a meeting sponsored by the
took place in the First Methodist
Fellowship of Reconciliation

(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)
Open Letter to the Campus
WE BELIEVE this country belongs to all its citizens, and
its welfare depends upon the productivity of, the taxes
paid by, the military services rendered by, ALL its citizens.
We therefore believe that all its citizens should have equal
opportunity to enjoy all its benefits. We believe those prac-
tices (e.g. discrimination in employment and service because
of race, creed, or color) that deprive some of our citizens of
this opportunity, are undesirable. To eliminate some of
these practices in Ann Arbor, the University of Michigan
Chapter of the N.A.A.C.P. is initiating the sticker campaign
that was approved by a referendum in the 1953 fall elec-
tion of the Student Legislature. The purpose of the cam-
paign is to translate into action those practices which logic,
our philosophy, and our Constitution tell us are right. We
will distribute to those merchants who do not use dis-
criminatory practices in hiring or service, a sticker bearing
the slogan "Fair Play the Wolverine Way." This sticker is
not designed to encourage the non-discriminating mer-
chant to brag, but to encourage the discriminating business-
man to copy the fair merchant's ways. This campaign is based
on the belief that most of the students believe in equal
rights and on the belief that in a free enterprise, economy
the "consumer is King." The students, by using their patron-
age, can make all businessmen in the community adopt fair
practices.
(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)

ONE OF THE TYPICAL LABORATORY SET UPS

L.

Student Supplies
TYPEWRITERS
REPAIRED
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
Fountain Pens repaired by
a factory trained man.
Webster-Chicago
Tape Recorders
314 S. State Ph. NO 8-7177
Open Saturday 'til 5 P.M.

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1/ - 6 ' I;

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-Lecl

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Chicago College of
OPTOMETRY
(Fully Accredited)
Excellent opportunities for
qualified men and women.
Doctor of Optometry degree in
three years for students enter-
ing with sixty or more semester
credits in specified Liberal Arts
courses.

If you are flanring one, we sin-
cerely. will enjoy helping you in
working out the details of your
Printed ineeds.
We offer tasteful, beautiful wed-
ding invitations and announce-rents,
prin ted, cm bossed, or en graved and

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ANIMALS ARE USED IN EXPERIMENTS

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CAGE WASHING MACHINE IN WHICH CAGES ARE WASHED
AND STERILIZED

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DAILY'
PHOTO
FEATURE
Photographs by

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