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May 08, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-05-08

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SATURDAY, MAY 8, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

k 'PLAYWRITES AT FAULT':
Gish SeeSlp in American Theater

'U' Television Sets Model
As Educational Method

Generation in conjunction with the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society Initia-
Inter-Arts Union, will present a poetry tion Dinner, May 12, 6:30 p.m., Michi-
reading at 2:30 p.m. in the Michigan gan Union Ballroom. Dr. Reuben L.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

By PHYLLIS LIPSKY
"We've got all kinds of talent,
more than we can use, but our
theater is just sick."
Lillian Gish, who opens here on
Monday in the leading role of
"Trip to Bountiful," the first play
in the 1954 Drama Season, was
commenting on the current Ameri-
can Theatrical scene.
* * *
CITING THE lack of playwrites
as "the weakness of our national
theater," Miss Gish said, "It must
be very difficult to write a play.
It must be the most difficult thing
in the world-otherwise we would
be getting more good ones."
+ Characterizing herself as "a
beligerant American, who claims
the whole country with tremen-
dous pride," the noted actress
pointed to what she felt was be-
hind the weaknesses of the
American theater.
"We culturally don't feel the
need for intellectual and emotional
stimulus," she said.
The Ohio born actress, who
made her stage debut when she
was five years old in a little town
called Rising Sun, Ohio, termed
herself "an actress of necessity."
"ACTING IS A very personal
kind of business," she declared.
The actress must learn to control
her voice-there are over 200 mus-
cles in the throat of which the
average person uses only four, she
said.
She must learn to keep her
body flexible, which requires
knowledge of "every kind of
thing" from fencing to modern
dancing and ballet, she ex-
plained.
"Like any other job, I've had to
earn my living at it,, but always
thought something else was bet-
ter." Her other ambitions, she con-
Investigations
To Be Viewed
The Rights and Responsibilities
of Congressional Investigating
Committees will be the topic under
discussion at a meeting at 3 p.m.
tomorrow in the Hillel Founda-
tion Chapel, 1429 Hill Street.
Sponsored by the Green Feather
Group, Young Democrats and Stu-
dents for Democratic Action, the
public meeting will include speak-
ers Henry Owens, Democratic can-
didate for Congress and member
of the faculty of Michigan State
Normal College, and Charles Lock-
wood, attorney for Milo Radulo-
vich.
SAFEGUARD I
Carry your cas
TRA VE1ER
" CON\
® SAFE
o PRAC
Inquire
ANN AUD

Main and H
State Street at
1108 South
Whitmore La
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-Daily-Betsy Smith
LILLIAN GISH: "I'M AN ACTRESS OF NECESSITY."

fessed, were to teach kindergarten
and to be a librarian "where no
one would bother me and I could
read all the books."
Miss Gish described her current
role in "Trip to Bountiful" as that
Auto Institute
To Meet Here
The University will play host to
the Institute for Teachers of Au-
to Mechanics today with a pro-
gram starting at 9 a.m. in the Un-
ion.
Sponsored by the Department of
Vocational Education and Practi-
cal Arts, in cooperation with the
Department of Mechanical and In-
dustrial Engineering and the 'U'
Extension Service, the program
will start with an address by Stan-
ley Roe of the Automobile Manu-
facturers Association of Detroit in
the morning.
A panel discussion by the mem-
bers of the Automotive Industry's
Vocational Education Conference
will be focused on "Services of the
Automotive Industry's Vocational
Education Conference."
A symposium will also be held
discussing "How the Automotive
Industry and Education Can Work
Together." Members of this panel
include L. A. Mitchell, of the Gen-
eral Motors Corporation in Detroit,
Carl T. Doman, of the Ford Divi-
sion of the Ford Motor Company,
and Phillip Hopkins of the Chrys-
ler Corporation.

of "a farm woman from Texas hav-
ing great spiritual trouble."
* * *
THE DRAMA Season's opening
presentation, now in rehearsal at
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theater,
comes to Ann Arbor after a suc-
cessful Broadway run, which critics
described as the greatest personal
triumph of the actress' career.
"It's a kind of passionate play,"
she said, a study in three sets of
.values, represented by Miss Gish,
who plays the mother, Kim
Stanly as the daughter-in-law,
and the son played by John Con-
well.
The play, written by Horton
Foote, was originally presented as
a television condensation. It met
with such favorable audience re-
action that it was placed before
New York theater goers in its orig-
inal form, as a full length, three-
act production.
The star of "Bountiful," who has
been an actress all her life on
stages all over Europe as well as
in the United States, is also cred-
ited with an extensive screen ca-
reer.
HER STAGE career, which be-
gan in a play called "In a Little
Red School House," (it also had a
second title "In Convict Stripes")
was temporarily terminated at the
age of eleven years "when I grew
awkward."
She then turned to the med-
ium of silent films, where pho-
tography was poor and heroines
had to have very young faces.
"Old hags of eighteen," she said,
"were playing character roles."
"When I was in films," Miss Gish
declared, "we played to the world."
Without the aid of sound, actors
had "to talk with their bodies"
using what she called elemental
gestures. "We had to go to animals
to learn gestures," she said since
characteristic western movements
might not be understood in other
parts of the world.
Movies coming out of Hollywood
today are not of the same caliber,
Miss Gish feels, as some of the
early films.
"I saw a movie the other day,"
she said, "and with all the people
in it I came away remembering a
beautiful refrigerator in a lovely
kitchen." It had an all star cast,
she said, "Capable people who were
never asked to act."

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first
of two articles on the mass communi-
cations medium of television.)
By ALICE SEITZMAN
Pioneer in the growing move-
ment to serve the educational
needs of adults through a new and
powerful medium of mass com-
munication, the University has set
a pattern from which a number of
other colleges have drawn, guided
by their demands and facilities.
Television broadcasting began
here in November of 1950, when
WWJ-TV extended an offer of
time on the air and production fa-
cilities to be used for a one-hour
program. The newly-formed Tele-
vision Office presented its first
"telecourse" designed for people
other than college students who
were interested in continuing their
education.
* * *
DURING ITS three years of
telecasting, the University has pro-
duced series on such widely var-
ied topics as photography, a study
of political parties and the solar
system.
Instructors are chosen from
the University's faculty with an
eye for showmanship and tele-
vision stage presence as well as
knowledge of their fields and
ability to teach. An average of
40 props is used on each pro-
gram, ranging from billiard balls
to 12-foot fir trees.
Often their invention requires
some ingenuity. Once the Televi-
sion Office had the task of demon-
strating the critical mass needed
for an atomic explosion. The solu-
tion came in the form of powder-
ed sugar, blown through holes in
a box cover by hand bellows.
VU'Instructors
Write Creed
For Teachers
Hoping for nation-wide distri-
bution, three University English
professors have formulated a "Mi-
chigan Teachers' Creed."
The professors, Warner G. Rice,
A. K. Stevens and Bennett Weaver,
state in a headnote to the creed
that every good teacher will peri-
odically examine the principles on
which he is acting. They further
explain that one of the best ways
for a teacher to determine his
principles is to state them in 'such
a way as to point up contemporary
issues in education."
* * *.
CONSISTING OF ten major
points, the creed begins by defining
a teacher as "a guide who knows
the trails and leads travelers to a
sure destination." It continues by
explaining that the character of
the teacher is of utmost import-
ance, and that education must help
students to "distinguish between
right and wrong."
An important part of the do-
cument is the statement that the
instructor must triumph "over
popular dogmas which insist
that morals are a matter of sta-
tistics, that environment domi-
nates will, that the normal is
preferable to the excellent, and
that self-interest is man's master
motive."
On the assumption that the
"permanent" is of greater impor-
tance than the "changing," the
professors say that the teacher
"must help individuals to find and
to adopt these values which are
lasting."
The final point in the creed
states that "great validities" are
most easily found "in masterpieces
of literature" whcih are "the crys-
talized experience of the most sen-
sitive, reflective and observant
minds."
The creed will be carried by the
May 8 edition of "The Michigan

Alumnus." I

Viewers may enroll with the Uni-
versity Extension Service in order
to receive supplementary material
for each lesson. At the end of the
course an examination is sent to
registrants. Those who take it re-
ceive Certificates of Participation.
IT WAS found through ques-
tionnaires that as many men as
women watch the programs. In-
cluded in the registrants have been
a pinsetter in a bowling alley, and
a mortician who registered in the
human biology course "to help him
in his business."
When th Sunday TV hour was
first launched, the program was
broken down into two telecours-
es and a "teletour" or visit to
some portion of the campus. La-
ter the teletour was made into
a separate program entitled
"Michigan Report" broadcast
each Saturday over WWJ-TV.
Students receive training in tele-
vision techniques by participating
in a series of non-commercial pro-
grams originating from University
studios and telecast over WPAG-
TV. The shows include two or
three hours of varied bills a week
including adult education, chil-
ren's shows, sports, music and dra-
ma.
Michigan High
School Choirs
To Sing Today
Over 1,000 high school music
students will take part in the Class
A Festival Chorus program today
to be highlighted by a public con-
cert free of charge at 3:30 p.m. in
Hill Auditorium.
Sponsored by the Michigan State
Vocal Association, the program will
open with the Festival Choir sing-
ing three numbers: "Let All The
Nations Praise The Lord" by Leis-
ring, "We Have No Other Guide"
by Schvedof and "Our God Is A
Rock" by Davis.
* * *
THE UNIVERSITY Bach Choir
of 179 voices directed by Maynard
Klein will then sing "Neue Liebes-
lieder," Op. 65 by Brahms. Fol-
lowing this, the Festival Choir will
sing: "Wondrous Cool, Thou
Woodland Quiet" by Brahms, "Rise
Up, My Love" by Healey Willan,
"Song of the Brook" (girls' voices)
and "Charlottown" by Bryan.
Concluding the program, the
Bach Choir will join with the
Massed Festival Choir for the
singing of the "Crucifixus" from
Bach's "B Minor Mass."
Co-chairmen of the event are
Geneva Nelson, music education
prof., and Donald C. Richardson,
instructor in music education.
Prof. Nelson said that the pur-
pose of the festival "is to give
high school students the enjoy-
ment of singing in a massed group
under an inspiring director and al-
so to give them an opportunity to
hear an outstanding choral
group."
The festival choirs participating
in today's program are: Ann Ar-
bor High School, Dearborn High
School, Christian High School in
Grand Rapids, Hamtramck High
.School, and high schools in Jack-
son, Kalamazoo, Lapeer, Midland,
Muskegon, Muskegon Heights, Wa-
terford Township, Pontiac, Port
Huron and Wyandotte.
A similar festival for Class B
schools is being held today at Mi-
chigan State College, and another
for Class C and D schools at Cen-
tral Michigan College of Educa-
tion at Mt. Pleasant.
Africa has 20 per cent of the

world's land surface, but producesI
only 5 per cent of its food.

(Continued from Page 4)
Michigan School Vocal Association
Concert, 3:30 Saturday afternoon, May
8, in Hill Auditorium. Featured will be
Class A High School Festival Choirs
from surrounding communities and the
University Bach Choir. Maynard Klein,
Conductor of University Choirs, will
lead the festival choirs in two groups
of English songs, and the Bach Choir
in Brahms' Neue Liebeslieder, Op. 65,
and Bach's Mass in B Minor. The con-
cert will be open to the general public
without charge. Theyaudience will sit
in the first balcony, since the first
floor has been reserved for the fourteen
high school choirs participating.
Events Today
Inter-Arts Festival: Program of Dra-
ma and Dance, 8 p.m., Barbour Dance
Studio. Inter-Arts Union will present
two one-act plays: "Higher and Higher
Down," by Renee Kluger, and "A Cock-
tail Quadrille," by Gayle Greene; "The
composition.by Robin Squier and Don-
Legend of John Henry," a modern dance
aid Harris. Open to the public without
charge.
Students Arts Festival. As a part of
the Sixth Annual Student Arts Festival,

Union. Exact room number will be
posted on bulletin board in lobby. The
public Is invited.
Sigma Delta Pi. Members of Sigma
Delta Pi, Spanish Honor Society, are
urged to attend the initiation which
will take place at 7:30 p.m., Sat., May
8, West Conference Room, Rackham
Building.
African Union will present a Cultural
Program on Sat., May 8, at 8 p.m .in the
Rackham Assembly Hall. The program
will feature African art, music, and na-
tive dances, followed by social dancing.
All are welcome.
Hillel Foundation. Petitions tre now
available for positions in Hillel Student
Government at the Secretary's Office
between 9:30 and 5 p.m. The deadline
is Tues., May 11, at 4 p.m.
Congregational-Disciples Guild: 9
a.m., CLEAN-UP DAY at Guild House;
Lunch provided, a p.m., Graduate-Pro-
fessional Group at Guild House.
U. of M. Sailing Club members will
be driving to Base Line Lake this week-
end at 1 and 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, and
at 9:15 a.m. and 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
on Sunday. Cars will leave promptly at
these times from the side door of the
Union.
Coming Events
Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society Business
Meeting for members, Mon., May 10, 4
p.m., 517 Administration Building
(basement).

Kahn will speak on "Tissue-cell De-
fense Strategy." Make reservations with
secretary (J. M. Jimenez) before Tues-
day noon. Telephones; Office 3-0215,
Res., 3-5508.
Undergraduate Mathematics Club,
Mon., May 10, at 8 p.m., in Room 3-A,
Union, Nominations for next year's of-
ficers will be held. Prof. N. H. Kuiper,
visiting professor from the University
of Wagenungen, Netherlands, will speak
on "Triangles."
The Inter-Arts Union will present a
program of chamber music by student
composers Sunday, 8 p.m., Henderson
Room, League. Works by Reginald Hall,
Edward Chudacoff, Fred Fox, Bruce
Wise, and Gordon Sherwood will be
performed. Open to the public without
charge.
Hillel Foundation. Independence Day
Dance to be held Sun., May 9, at Hillel.
Public Meeting-"The Rights and Res-
ponsibilities of Congressional Investi-
gating Committees" HEAR: Prof. Henry
Owens, Democratic candidate for Con-
gress; Abe Zwerdling, Detroit Attorney;
Charles Lockwood, Attorney for Milo
Radulovich; Dave Kornbluh, outspoken
campus liberal. The speakers will pre-
sent historical, moral, ethical and legal
aspects of Congressional Investigations.
The meeting is sponsored by the Green
Feather Group, Young Democrats and
Students for Democratic Action. Place:
Chapel of Hillel, 1429 Hill St. near Wash-
tenaw. Time: 3 p.m., Sun., May 9. Ad-
mission free.

R41,

r

4- * * * *

*

YOUR MONEY
h by means of
S CHEQUES
VENIENT
;T ICA L

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FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45-"Faces Through the Mist," Dr. Parr will
deliver the sermon
7:00 P.M.-Student Guild in the Mayflower
Room, for a desert meeting with the Interna-
tional Students. The program will be a panel
discussion.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone NO 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00-Sunday School
11 :00-"Tempted-But Not Overcome
6:00-Student Guild
7:30-"The Forgiveness of Sin"
Wed. 7:30-Prayer Meeting
We extend a friendly welcome to you. Come and
hear the Word of God.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays: 7:30 P.M., Bible Study.
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays: 1:00-1:30 P.M.
THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY in Ann Arbor
presents Series of Introductory Talks on Theosophy
every Wednesday at 8 P.M.
Place: 736 So. State St., Telephone NO 2-6295
Public is cordially invited.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.: Morning Service.
7:00 P.M.: Evening Service.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-11:00 A.M.-Worship at the Center
NOTE: Because of the Retreat at Camp Birkett
there will be no Bible Class or Sunday even-
ing meeting at the Center.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45-Morning Worship. Sermon: "The Touch
of his Hand"
Nursery for children during service
9:45 A.M.-Church School
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M.-Dessert meeting at the Congregational
Church; International Student Panel: "Educa-
tion,"
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod'
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Services, with the
pastor preaching on "A Christian Looks at
Marriage." (Communion in 9:30 service).
Sunday at 3:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Outing and Picnic Supper at Dexter-
Huron Park. Meet at the Center at 3.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Pastor and
Student Counselor

9:45 A.M.-The Student Class begins a study
of the Psalms.
11:45 A.M.-Morning Worship Service. Rev.
Loucks speaks on "An Emblem of Heaven It-
self."
6:45 P.M.-Roger Williams Guild. A Mother's
Day program with Mrs. C. A. Harris speak-
ing on "What a Mother Wants From Her
Children."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
CharlesBMitchell, Assistant Minister
Donna B. Lokker, Program Assistant
William S. Baker, Minister to Students
9:15 A.M.-Vocation Seminars: A Christian In
Medicine, Dr. Henderson; in business, Mr.
McCracken; in education, Prof. Wendrich
9:15 and 11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship: Dr.
Kuizenga preaching
6:45 P.M.-Dr. and Mrs. Kuizenga and Dr.
and Mrs. Baker will lead a discussion on
Christian Marriage and Family Life.
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00-Adult Group-Prof. Kenneth Boulding on:
"Problems of Academic Freedom"
11:00-Service of Worship: Sermon: "In Praise
of Women."
7:30 P.M.-Unitarian Student Group Discussion
on "Facts Forum"
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Dr. Robert H. Whitaker, Chaplain for
Student Foundation
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis, Social Director

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
Identical Services at 9:00 and 10:45 A.M. ...
"Christianity in Family Living," Dr. Abbey
preaching.
5:30 P.M.-Fellowship Supper
7:00 P.M.-Christian Student Foundation from
Michigan State College will present "A Sleep of
Prisoners" in the Sanctuary of the church.
Public is invited, no charge.

NOW at

11

OR BANK

uron Streets
Nickels Arcade
University
ke, Michigan

I
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Hillel
Petitions are available until
Tuesday, May 11, for positions
in the Hillel Student Govern-
ment. Positions include Reli-
gious, Cultural, Social, Publi-
city, Publication, and Special
Events committee chairmen.
Petitions may be picked up
from Mrs. Shipman at the Hil-
lel Foundation.

I

THE CHRISTIAN STUDENT FOUNDATION
of Michigan State College
presents

7:00 A.M.:
9:00 A.M.:
10:00 A.M.:
House.

Holy Communion.
Holy Communion.
Student Breakfast, Canterbury

,: r * *

A SLEEP OF PRISONERS

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III

'HE OPENING OF
iunday, May 9th

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11:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Sermon.
During the Week: Wed and Thurs. Holy Com-
munion 7:00 A.M.; Student Breakfast at Can.
terbury House. Fri. 12:10 P.M. Holy Com.
munion. Tues. and Fri. Student Tea at Can-
terbury House 4-5:15 P.M. Canterbury Club
Friday evening. Supper Club Sunday Evening.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos. Minister to Students
10:45 A.M.-Worship Service, Sermon-Rev.
Press, "Four Rules of Christian Living."
7:00 P.M.-Student Guild. Miss Harriet Leh-
man, guest. Discussion topic, "World Univer-
sity Service."
THE WESLEY FOUNDATION
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, Eugene
A. Ransom, Ministers
Sunday, May 9-
10:-90 A M -Student Sminnr

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