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May 08, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MAY 8, 1954

i

1'ACV ~1X TIlE MIChIGAN DAiLY SATURDAY, MAY 8, 1954

State Board
Surveys Plan
For Turnpike'
By WALLY EBERHARD
A Bay City-Toledo Turnpike by
'56.
That's the goal of the Michigan,
Turnpike Authority. When traffic!
surveys between the two points are
completed sometime in July, the
feasibility of such a pay-as-you-
drive highway will be known for
certain, according to William E.
Slaughter, Jr., of Detroit, Author-
ity chairman.
* * *
SEVERAL PROBLEMS face the
Authority before bonds are issued
and work begins on the road.
First, if the road is to connect
Bay City and Toledo via De-
troit, a route must be chosen
close enough to the Motor City
without incurring too great a
purchase price for right of way.
And, as Slaughter said, "People
aren't going to drive out to Ann
Arbor to get on a turnpike going
north." So, the turnpike must be
close enough for convenience but
far enough out for economy of
construction.
The estimated cost is $225,000,-
000 and would take two full con-
struction "seasons." Present plans
call for financing the construction
by a bond issue to be paid by
revenue from tolls on the proposed
road, but before the bonds can be
issued a court test of the law cre-
ating the authority must be won.
* * *
THE TEST suit is viewed as
necessary to establish the legality
of bonds which would be offered
to nation-wide investors. The
bond issue, according to Slaughter,
is a possibility "by late fall or early
winter."
T h e north-south turnpike
could eventually link up with
the Ohio turnpike now under
construction.
Once this Bay City-Toledo pro-
ject is successfully underway, the
Authority may turn to its number
two goal, an east-west pike con-
necting Chicago and Detroit, says
Slaughter.
This toll road, with an estimated
cost of about $210,000,000 would
begin near Willow Run and stretch
eastward 176 miles through Michi-
gan to link with the planned Indi-
ana turnpike at the Indiana state
line.
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LABORATORY SETUPS WILL BE DEMONSTRATED AS
PART OF THE 'U' HOSPITAL OPEN HOUSE TODAY
Displays To Be Featured
At Hospital Open House

Men's Glee
To Perform,
Here Today'
The Men's Glee Club, under the
direction of Prof. Philip A. Duey.
will give a concert at 8:30 .m. to-
day in Hill Auditorium.
They will start their program
with the traditional opening hymn,
"Laudes Atque Carmina" by Stan-
ley, '90. Next on the program will
be "A Mighty Fortress is Our God"
by Luther, to be followed by Han-'
del's "Care Selve," Haydn's "To
The Women," and Schubert's "The
Omnipotence," with K. Thomas
Lester, Grad., as tenor soloist.
* * *
RUSSELL Christopher, Grad.,,
will follow as baritone soloist in
Balakiriff's "The Call of Freedom"
and Verdi's "Ford's Monologue"
from "Falstaff."
The Glee Club will conclude
the first part of the program
with R. Vaugh Williams' "Let.
Beauty Awake" and "The Infin-
ite Shining Heaven" with K.
Thomas Lester, Grad., as solo-
ist; "The Trumpeter" by J. Airlie
Dix; "Far Above The Purple
Hills" by Vittorio Gianinni, with
Robert McGrath, '54SM, as ten- -;
or soloist; and "Luck Be A Lady"
from "Guys and Dolls" by Frank
Loesser, with Russell Christo-
pher, Grad., as soloist.
After the intermission, the Glee
Club will perform a work they callj
"Boy Meets Girl" which includes::
"Romance," "Love Is Where You I
Find It," "Easy To Love;" "In The
Still Of The Night;" "I'm Getting
Sentimental Over You;" "I've Nev-
er Been In Love Before;" and "Ah,.
Sweet Mystery of Life." A group
of selections by the Novelaires will
follow.
MCFA To Holdj
Annual CourseI
For Managers
i "Tn~ucR~noP_4PnrT

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Everything from a tablet mak-
ing' machine used in the hospital
pharmacy to a radioactive isotope
unit used in detecting cancer will
be displayed at the University Hos-
pital Day open house for the peo-
ple of Ann Arbor from 3 to 6 p.m.
tomorrow.
Held completely in the Out-Pa-
tient Building, Hospital Day will
be an opportunity for the com-
munity to learn more about the
hospital and the people who staff
it. Instead of the usual planned
tours, the exhibits, being shown
by thirty seven of the hospital
TV To Show
Medical Work
'U' television will present an-
other in the Michigan Report ser-
ies today at 5:45 p.m. highlighting
research on high blood pressure,
allergies and industrial health that
is being carried on at the Univer-
sity's new Kresge Medical Re-
search Building.
The 15-minute show on WWJ-
TV will also describe other parts
of the $3,500,000 building which is
to be dedicated on May 15.

departments, will be examined at
close range.
T * *
OF GENERAL interest will be
the Central Services display, show-
ing how gloves and needles are
tested before use. Some of the
equipment which will be used was
developed in the University Hos-
pital.
Also, the University Respira-
tory Center -ill demonstrate the
equipment used in polio treat-
ment. This along with the oc-
cupational therapy, physical
inedicine and therapy, dietetics,
business and finance portions of
the program will be explained.
One of the more unusual aspects
of the program will be that of the
hospital school. It will show the
play and teaching materials used
to make the stay of the, child in
the hospital both educational and
recreational.

rs Tell
Pro blem s
Making movies has involved e%
erything from shooting "on loca-
tion" from a helicopter to a staged
Michigras parade for the Univer-
sity Audio-Visual Education Cen-
ter.
The Center, in addition to stock-
ing 7,500 films for campus use, has
produced 16 movies in the last two
years to fill University instruction-
al and public relations needs. Al-
though business has fallen off in
Hollywood, Center directors have
found that the demand for their
films far exceeds their capacity for
production,
MOVIE MAKING is a long and
complicated process, according to
production director Aubert Lavas-
,b tida. For just one eight second
scene in the Center's latest release,
"The First Hundred," the crew
took more than 10 days to build
a Michigras float, had to do re-
search on an 1850 bathing suit and
then get local police to shut off
traffic while the actual filming
took place,
Then there are always last
minute changes torbe made, with
every detail being recorded on
the shooting script and later on
a master script. Comparing it
to a scavenger hunt, Lavastida
told of a "constant collecting iu
the sound track and camera un-
ROLL til you have it all completed."
The actual filming is just the
beginning, however. In parts where
the sound could not be recorded
along with the shooting, the nar-
rator or actor must read against
the picture over and over until the
two syncronize. Then music, in
some cases an original score, is re-
corded and matched frame for
frame.
All this editing is done on a work
print, which has every foot num-
bered. Optical effects must , be
worked in and by the time the
"pilot" film, on which final chan-
ges are made, is ordered, there are
often as many as five film strips
and sound tracks to be combined.
The whole process is under di-
rection of a production commit-
tee, with a University collabora-
tor as co-sponsor if it is an edu.
cational movie. Personnel are
recruited individually for each
show and due to lack of space
filming is often scattered over a
wide area.
Judging from sales and rentals,
the University's venture into the
movie industry has been success6
ful. A New York television firm has
distributed films to all 48 states
and the State Department has
translated one movie into 12 lan-
guages. In addition, prints for sales
EVERY DETAIL and rental have been ordered from
as far away as New Zealand.

LAST ADJUSTMENTS BEFORE THE CAMERAS ARE READY TO

,A,

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'

tc ca~ixiai i 1O~ty svManager-meeting -i-
Laboratory set ups will be run day's Challenge" will be the theme
by medical technicians who have for the Michigan Consumer Fi-
included in their program a blood nance Association (MCFA) when1
bank, demonstrating exactly how they hold their annual meeting
laboratory tests are carried out. May 11-12 at the University.
Some 90 managers will take a
IN CONTRAST with these mod- study course on consumer finance
ern techniques and methods the management problems. The man-
Medical Illustrations Department agers will be divided into two
will have a gallery of illustrations groups, an introductory and an
showing how medicine has chang- advanced section.
ed over the years. The MCFA is being sponsored'
Hospital officials have empha- by the business administration
sized that those on the staff of school.
the hospital will answer any Dean Russell A. Stevenson of the
questions that visitors may have business administration will close
According to Dr. Albert Kerli- the course with presentation of
kowske, Director of University certificates.
Hospital, "Our staff will be avail -
able to depict at close range the I

v

... ....

PARKING TROUBLES
GOT YOU IN A WHIRL?
They won't if you shop at the

* BEER
Daily 10

m

BEER
DEPOT

11

.:

{
1
i

You drive through
* SOFT DRINKS * WINE
114 E. Williams Phone 7191
A.M. - 10 P.M. - Sunday, Noon - 7 P.M.

many groups which contribute to
the medical care for the hospitall
patient."
Blue Team
There will be an important
rehearsal of the Blue Team
floorshow of this year's Frosh
Weekend at 2 p.m. tomorrow in
the League Ballroom. All mem-
bers of the cast must attend the
meeting.

Now,

11

GRADUATING SENIORS,
ORDER
CAPS and GOWNS

t

Campus
Calendar
Students of the Christian Stu-
dent Foundation of Michigan State:
College, sponsored by the Univer-
sity Wesley Foundation, will pre-
sent Christopher Fry's "A Sleep
of Prisoners" at 7 p.m. tomorrow
at the First Methodist Church.
In the play Fry portrays man's
struggle to understand himself
and his relationship to God.
This is the second presentation
of the play this semester.
The performance is open to all
students and faculty.
African Union will present its
third annual cultural show fea-
turing native art, music and danc-
ing at 8 p.m. today in the Rack-
ham Bldg.
Foreign students will perform
African dances accompanied by
native music. They will also give
a commentary on the culture of
that continent. Exhibitions of
art from different parts of Af-
rica will be featured. The eve-
ning will conclude with social
dancing.
A fee of 25 cents will cover re-
freshments,
SL Guild
"Bloodhounds of Broadway"
starring Mitzi Gaynor, Scott
Brady and Wally Vernon will
be shown by the Student Legis-
lature Cinema Guild at 7 and 9
p.m. today and 8 p.m. Sunday
in the Architecture Auditorium.
Admission is 50c.
Although orchids were once
thought to be parasites on trees,
it is now known that they cling
to trees, but do not take any nour-
ishment from them.
-

3

WRITE IT, CHANGE IT, REVISE IT-SCRIPT CONFERENCES GO OVER]

. . , at. . .

7v rspt S. k
71 1 N. University -- Harold S. Trick - South State

FILM AND SOUND TRACKS MUST BE COORDINATED,. .

... AND CHECKED FOR PERFECT SYNCHRONIZATION

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II

Graduatin
Order your DAILY for
next year now!l

DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE

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