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April 27, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-04-27

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k
TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUnDAY, 1L R7, 1954

TWO TUE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 1954

j'
' :

East Problems Crucial at Geneva

19 Nations
To Discuss
War Areas
By DA BAAD
With partial attention focused
on the increasingly tense war sit-
Mation in Indochina, the 19-na-
tion Far Eastern Conference open-
ed in Geneva yesterday hoping to
find solutions for both the Korea
and Indochina problems.
The Parley, the only tangible re-
sult of the Berlin Conference con-
cluded in early February, gets un-
derway amid a barrage of action
in other parts of .the world that
may tend to obscure the actual
objectives of the Geneva proceed-
ings.
* * *
THE ACTION has been especial-
ly evident in Indochina where the
Communists have been staging an
all out military effort to build up
further land claims, thus fortify-
ing their bargaining position at
the conference.
Despite a gallant effort by
French Union forces, the Red
armies have been pressing con-
stantly toward Dien Bien Phu,
an important French fortress
area only 180 miles north of
Hanoi.
While fierce hostilities were con-
tinuing in Indochina injections of
a verbal nature were being shot
into the situation.
Last Friday, the 14 NATO for-
eign ministers jointly stated that
the Soviet bloc had not changed
its policy of foreign expansion.
The next day Russian Foreign
Minister Vyacheslav Molotov
said his country was in favor of
a truce in Korea.
From New Delhi came a state-
ment from Prime Minister Jawa-
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ANTHONY EDEN

0

harial Nehru refusing to allow
United States planes to ferry
French troops from Europe to In-
dochina across Indian territory. He
also called for an immediate cease-
fire in Indochina and a pledge by
Great Britain, Russia and the
United States to keep hands off.
* * *
Red China Question .. .
Also last week the Communists
began a diligent effort to have
Red China established as an in-
viting power at Geneva, in effect
an addition to the present Big
Four.
Since this wasn't part of the de-
cision reached at the Berlin Con-
ference, the Western bloc flatly re-
fused the Communist proposal.
A possible crisis over the dis-
agreement was averted yester-
day as a result of private talks
between British Foreign Secre-
tary Anthony Eden and Molotov.
They agreed to rotate the Con-
ference chairmanship among the
foreign ministers of Thailand,
Britain and Russia.
* * *
WHILE THESE side develop-
ments may tend to divert the dele-
gates attention they still have two
major objectives at the Geneva
talks according to the final com-
munique delivered from the Ber-
lin meetings.
"(M Propose that a confer-
ence ... shall meet in Geneva
April 26 for the purpose of
reaching a peaceful settlement
of the Korean question. (2)
Agree that the problem of re-
storing peace in Indochina shall
also be discussed." .
19 states including the Big Four,
North and South Korea, Commu-
nist China and all but one coun-
try (South Africa) which sent
troops to Korea are sending rep-

resentatives to the Korean por-
tion of the Conference.
Only the Big Four plus Commu-
nist China will definitely partici-
pate in the Indochina discussions.
* * *
THE ALLIES have been trying
to develop some "common ground"
policy with which to enter the
Conference.
United States Secretary of
State John Foster Dulles tried
two weeks ago to form a 10-na-
tion defense group for "united
action in Indochina, but the ar-
rangement fell through when the
French and British governments
decided they didn't want to com-
mit themselves before the Ge-
neva meetings.
Contrary to the United States'
views, France and Britain have
been warm to a nearly truce in
Indochina. In fact the French have
been talking of breaking with the
United States to negotiate a truce
with the Communists themselves.
* * *
THE SPARK for the Geneva
Conference dates back a year ago,
when within three months the two
Cold War protagonists changed
their leaders.
Georgi Malenkov replaced the
deceased Joseph Stalin as So-
viet leader and Dwight D. Eisen-
hower took over the nited States
presidency.
These developments helped pro-
duce the Korean truce of July 27,
and after a five-month exchange
of notes between foreign ministers
the Big Four Foreign Ministers
Conference was held last winter
in Berlin.
Three weeks of stalemate fol-
lowed, but the groundwork was
laid for the Geneva discussion.

Korean Issue
Togas Agenda
At Conference
By WALLY EBERHARD
The roar of guns in Korea ceas-
ed just nine months ago today.
After fruitless negotiations, dis-
cussions have been undertaken by
the big four nations at Geneva,
and the world turns toward the
Swiss city for a solution to pre-
vent further bloodshed.
AT THE outset, the chief Kor-
ean issue-unification-appears as
an insoluble problem. Both sides
want unification, yet both oppose
unification by the other. Neither
appears willing to fight to impose
the unification.
Thus, it appears that a par-
titioned Korea will continue,
with perhaps some arrangement
for withdrawal of both UN and
Chinese troops.
The attempt to make a satis-
factory settlement in Korea dates
back to July 27, 1953 when repre-
sentatives of North Korea and the
United Nations command gathered
at Panmunjom to sign the armis-
tice.
The original agreement stipu-
lated that a "high-level" political
conference would be held within
three months to settle the issues of
withdrawal of foreign forces from
Korea and settlement of the Kor-
ean question.
t FIRST ABORTIVE attempts at
arranging such a peace conference
fizzled, as Special Envoy Arthur
Dean met throughout the fall of
'53 with Communist emmisarries
to arrange such a "high-level"
meeting. The Communists insisted
the Soviet Union be invited to such
a conference as a neutral, which
would allow Red participation in
the conference without, binding
them to agreements which might
be made.
The talks at Panmunjom ter-
minated in disagreement as
Dean maintained the United
States position that Soviet Un-
ion participation in peace talks
should also be binding to them.
The stalemate broke at the Ber-
lin Conference when Soviet For-
eign Minister Molotov opened the
conference, with a proposal to
"consider measures for reducing
tension in international relations"
by convening a meeting of the Big
Four nations-plus Red China.
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Parley Pets
Battle Area
a Spotlight
By AR.LENE LISS
As Communist forces continued
to bombard flaming Dien Bien Phu,
the Geneva delegates are keeping
careful watch on developments in
war ravaged Indochina-the sec-
ond issue on their agenda.
Until recently the war in the
Southeast Asia peninsula was a
forgotten one. Even the troops
slogging out a seven year war
seemed weary of the struggle. And
the French public footing the bill
for a stalemated battle in a far-
off colony were just as tired.
STARTING as a local native
revolt against the French colonists
on the question of a ruler, the Viet
Nam rebellion slowly smoldered
until today it is one of the most
crucial world problems. It has
ceased to be merely a French co-
lonial problem.
Since the Berlin conference
decision to discuss Indochina,
Communist forces have intensi-
fied their attack and reversed
their former tactics in an effort
to add pressure at Geneva.
The Communist tactics had a
marked affect on Western policy.
French public opinion had long
been pressuring for a negotiated
peace-their men and money were
being drained, by the fruitless war.
Thus the United States and Britain
were faced with the prospect of
the French compromising with the
Communists at Geneva or coming
to their aid.
THE EISENHOWER Adminis-
tration chose the latter course and
the British, with some reserva-
tions, followed. Secretary of State
Dulles three weeks ago proposed a
"united front" calling for collec-
tive action of nine interested na-
tions to prevent Indochina from
falling to the Communists. The
British supported this policy with
the condition that a settlement
first be attempted at Geneva.
Dulles' plan plus strong state-
ments by Vice-President Rich-
ard Nixon provoked Congres-
sional comments of "another
Korea." While Prime Minister
Nehru of India called for an im-
mediate cease fire.
In the opinion of American and
British leaders Indochina must be
saved because of its vital position
in the Par East. If Indochina is
subjugated there is an imminent
danger that Thailand, Burma and
Malaya, the rice bowl of Asia, will
also fall.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
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Figure 5 average words to a tine.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Political science 92 Notebook in
vicinity of Angell Ball. Call Helene
Lapides, NO'2-3119. Reward
LOST - One white-gold oval cufflink,
set with three stones. Sentimental
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FOR SALE
1948 HUDSON, fair body, good motor.
$175-T. Tuttle, NO 8-8574. " )4318
EVERGREENS at wholesale:
Pfitzer Juniper ....... .....2.50 to 7.50
Spreading Yews............ 3.25 to 4.25
Dwarf (mugho) Pine....... 2.50 to 4.50
Pyramidal Arborvitae......2.50 to 5.00
Blue Spruce ................2.00 per ft.
Leave orders at NO 8-8574. Michael
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1950 PLYMOUTH SUBURBAN - Radio,
heater, white wall tires--a good one.
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Washing-
ton. NO 2-4588. )426B
ARMY-'NAVY type Oxford"6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
A MEDIUM blue-grey gabardine suit.
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weekdays only. Ask for Steve. )299B
BATTERIES $5 EXCHANGB
Guaranteed - Free Installation
BATTERY STORES ASSOCIATION
Liberty and Ashley - NO 3-5113
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MAN'S WRIST WATCH in good condi-
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jewel, originally $83.71-now $50. Up-
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fair condition, $8.00. Folding baby pen
with pad, good condition, $15. Gray
folding baby buggy, chrome handle
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Folding nursery chair, $3. Majestic
portable radio with inside and out-
side aerial, $38. Large bathinet with
pad and lining, $8. Phone 2-9020.
)392B
SMITH-CORONA Portable Typewriter in
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1950 CHEVROLET CLUB COUPE-Radio
and heater. Metallic green. Very nice
car. 222 W. Washington, Huron Mo-
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1940 Lasalle with No. 8 Cadillac motor
in very good condition, radio, heater.
Complete car for $90, Motor $50. NO
2-9020. )4158

FOR SALE
1951 FORD VICTORIA-Radio, heater,
and overdrive. Nice. $1095. Univer-
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Phone NO 3-0507. )419B
1952 CHEVROLET BEL-AIRE, 2 tone
green, radio and heater and power
glide. 18,000 miles. Real nice. See
Benny. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )423B
1953, 26-FOOT ELCAR TRAILER. Like
new, complete bathroom. Call NO
5-1978. )420B
1949 STUDEBAKER - 2 door, black
Champion, heater and overdrive. One
owner, very clean. See Smitty, Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )422B
1949 LINCOLN-4 door, automatic trans-
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Will trade. Huron Motor Sales, 222
W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )425B
FOR SALE-A Martin Tenor Sax. In l
beautiful condition, a $350 value, rea-
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2-9206 between 8 and 10 p.m. )436B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
NEW ARGUS 300 W-automatic slide
projector. $66.50. $6.65 down, balance
monthly. Purchase Camera Shop. 116
S. University NO 8-6972. )432B
MEN'S BICYCLE -Lightweight. $10.00.
Phone "Pete" NO 3-1511, extension
2425. )434B
ASSORTED COLORED PARAKEETS...
which can be trained to talk. $8. Free
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HOUSE TRAILER-20 ft., 1948; $700,
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FOR RENT
GARAGE FOR RENT near South Quad.
Phone NO 3-8454. )47C
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Rooms by Day or Week
Campus Tourist Homes. Ph. NO 3-8434
518 E. Williams St. (near State)
) 25D
DOUBLE ROOM for rent, furnished,
very large. Will accommodate 2 stu-
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NO 3-2225. )64D
WANTED-Business or professional girl
to share apartment, near campus. Call
NO 2-1994 after 5:30. )67D
PERSONAL
LAST WEEK - SatEvePost & Ladies
Home Jr.-$7.50; new or renew; gift.
A $9.50 value! Student Periodical,
2-3061. ) 101F
HELP WANTED
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BUSINESS SERVICES
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Ann Arbor Radio and T.V.
"Student Service"
1217 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
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