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April 24, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-04-24

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GE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

9ATURDAY, APRIL 24, 1954

ICC Chief

Quits; New
Head Named
Jack Hilberry, '56A&D, president
of the Intercooperative Council,
resigned from office recently, in
order to devote more time to the
ICC's Kingsley House of which he
is president.
Phyllis Lipsky '55, ICC Secre-
tary, will serve as president until
the Council elections some time
in May.
The resignation stemmed from
two factors. The ICC felt that
someone was crucially needed to
head Kingsley House, since it is
a recent acquisition and now in
the process of organization and
repair. Also Hilberry plans to
be married on June 19 and move
into Kingsley House with his bride.
* * *
IN HIS "Abdication Speech"
printed in the ICC monthly news-
paper, the "Co-operator", Jack
Hilberry reflected upon his re-
snigation from the ICC presi-
dency and on co-ops as a whole.
"The value of co-ops centers
about their very essence as
democratic organizations, rela-
tively free from dictated de-
cisions by outside authorities,
dependent upon individual and
group responsibility for their
success and involved in solving
real basic problems of living.
There is no other such organi-
zation on campus," he continu-
ed.
"There is nothing new here,"
the statement went on, "we all
realize that these values are ours.
But it is good to nail them down,
state and examine them again.
They're impressive."
"Naturally it's a relief to be
out of the presidency because of
all the worry involved," he con-
cluded. "But, I'm going on to a
place that isn't running as smooth-
ly as the ICC, and doing a good
job in both places was impos-
sible."
Student Awards
Five psychology students re-
ceived fellowships from national
agencies.
Of the 22 National Science
Foundations Scholarship Fellow-
ships offered for study in psychol-
ogy, three were awarded to David
Green, '54, Rober Hefner, Grad.,
and Andre Weitzenhoffer, Grad.
Three others received fellowships
granted by the Social Science Re-
search Council.
NOW IS THE HOUR FOR
LOW COST
Radios Portables
Hi Fi and Three-Speed
Phonographs
Television
The TV Studio
1317 South University

CANNELL SPEAKS:
Psychologist
Brainwashin
By FLORENCE HUBER
There - is nothing mysterious
about the brainwashing techni-
que, says Dr. Charles F. Cannell,
psychologist and field director of
the University's Survey Research
Center.
"One might compare this to the
possibilities of a man's catching
cold," he said. "Everyone around
you is being exposed to the cold
germs. Resistance to catching
cold is a matter depending on the
condition of each individual. If
one person has a great deal of
resistance, he may be able to go
on indefinitely without catching
cold, but there is a likelihood that
sooner or later he will succumb."
WHAT DOES this new term
mean? Essentially, brainwashing
is a type of mental torture where-
by a man is forced to admit an
act he did not commit. Commu-
nist inquisitors have refined brain-
washing down to a science, and
forced such minds as that of the
Hungarian Cardinal Mindszenty
to "confess" to treason.
American prisoners of war
have told stories of inhumane
treatment meted out by cap-
tors striving for the opportunity
to claim POW's that have, for
example, confessed to "carrying
on germ warfare."
This result entails a psycholo-
gical switch of allegiances for the
majority of American prisoners.
Realizing that the physiological
and psychological are intimately
related, methods applying pres-
sure to both aspects of man's per-
sonality have been devised.
THE MARINE officer forced by
his Communist interrogators to
"confess" to germ warfare, Colonel
Frank H. Schnable, breaks down
the technique into four points:

--Dany--Jonn Hirtzei
NINETEEN-EIGHTY-FIVE?

Design Students Finish
Fuller Dymraxion Dome

Discusses
g Technique
1) Stripping the victim of all
personal dignity and exposing him
to constant degradation and hu-
miliation.
2) Reducing him to physical
and mental exhaustion.
3) Using fear and intimidation,
rather than physical mistreatment
as weapons.
4) Poisoning the mind by in-
stilling false hopes at some per-
iods while creating in the victim
a mistaken sense of personal and
national guilt.
Working on the theory that
every man has a breaking point
at which he will no longer re-
sist, the Communists brought
such pressure to bear upon the
mind of Major General William
F. Dean, that he now suggests
prisoners take poison rather than
face captivity.
Dr. Cannell remarked that there
is nothing new about the whole
idea, but that the Communists
have used brainwashing propa-
ganda as a valuable weapon of
fear. "For the purposes of psy-
chological warfare, brainwashing
has been made more subtleand
stories have made it seem some-
thing devilishly ingenious the
Communists have invented."
Wesley Allinsmith, of the
psychology department, feels that
one of the important psychologi-
cal principles on which the Com-
munists rely is "identification
with the aggressor."
LECTURES:
World Travel
Series Slated
Ann Arbor's first World Travel
and Adventure Series will start
October 10, featuring world fam-
ous travelers lecturing and show-
ing their own 'color movies.
The tentative schedule of speak-
ers and dates has been planned,
with Len Stuttman lecturing on
October 10, on "Across Tropical
Africa." The other lectures will
be: Robert Davis on November 14:
"Iceland, Capri of the North;"
Earl Brink on December 12: "Ta-
hiti;" and Francis Line, '28, on
January 9: "The Road to Gran-
deur-Mexico Through The Cana-
dian Rockies."
Carl Robinson on February 13:
"Brazil;" and Gerald Hooper on
March 13: "Italy" conclude the
series.

The first Dymaxion dome made
its appearance on campus yester-
day afternoon.
Employing the theory of F.
Buckminster Fuller which at-
tempts to= derive the maximum
benefits from a minimum quantity
of materials and energy, the dome
made completely of waterproof
cardboard and plastic was set up
in the courtyard of the College of
Architecture and Design.
* * *
SENIOR design students work-
ing under Fuller designed, organ-
ized and executed the plans.
Starting last Monday the group,
working in nearly twenty-four
hour cycles was able to complete
a test assembly Thursday after-
noon.
The shelter has been created
for test use in a summer camp.
It is a three-quarters sphere,
nine feet high. Weighing 60
pounds, materials for the en-
tire project totalled $90.
Windows at tip-tilt angles to
conform with the contours of the
structure are made of heavy plas-
tic, and seams of the dome are
covered with rayon tape.
FULLER, who has been working
with the Marine Corps on a plan
to air-lift pre-assembled dome
shelters to battle zones has point-
ed to the use of such structures as
a solution to survival problems in
the picture.
Backed by years of testing and
experiments, he feels that in
the event of an H-Bomb ex-
plosion these structures will be
able to withstand far greater
shocks than the ordinary build-
ing and will be able to survive a

relatively short distance from
Target Zero.
The reason for this, he explained
is that the rounded contours of
his building form more nearly fol-
low the shock lines of the explos-
ion.
The New York architect also ex-
plained that the economy of these
structures and the assembling ef-
ficiency make them very adaptable
for rapid mass production. '
French Club
To Give Play
"Ces Dames Aux Chapeaux
Verts," a modern French comedy
by Albert Acremant, will be pre-
sented on Wednesday as the an-
nual play production of Le Cercle
Francais.
Prof. Charles E. Koella, of the
romance languages dept., is the
director of the play. An all stud-
ent cast, composed of french club
members, will speak entirely in
French.
The plot of the play centers
around a family of old maids,
whose regulated life is disturbed
by the sudden intrusion of Ar-
lette, an 18 year old orphaned
niece.
The cast will include Marie Lue
Condon, '57, Arthur White, '54,
William Baird, Gay Duerson, '56,
Lois Bietsky, '56, Marjorie Green-
field, '56, Clinton Hanover, '57,
Marguerite Goebel, '57, John Mc-
Carus and Elizabeth Beckwith, '54.
'Veranda' Gives
Final Showing
Today will mark the last per-
formance of Eugene Hochman's
Hopwood Award winning play
"Veranda on the Highway."
The performance begins at 8
p.m. in' Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, and tickets are still available
at the League box office.
The scene of the play is France
after the second World War, and
the story centers around the con-
flicts of a young Frenchman who
had been an underground leader.
ORPH EUM
MATS. 70c - EVES. 90c
Shows 1:00 - 3:00 - 5:00
7:00 -- 9:00
. nemM-G-MMOssa n
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARES
J LI
MARLON BRANDO
* JAMES MASON
JOHN BIELGUD
LOUIS GALERN
EDMOND O'BRIEN
AND GREER GARSON
DEBORAH KERR
READ AND USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90, 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Black Clutch Bag. Late Monday
night, at Ann Arbor Greyhound bus
station. Money unimportant-person-
al possessions desired. Approximately
$20 reward for returning. Call NO
3-1561, 4015 Stockwell. )133A
LOST - One white-gold oval cufflink.
set with three stones. Sentimental
value. Reward. Call NO 3-5174.
FOR SALE
1950 PLYMOUTH SUBURBAN - Radio,
heater, white wall tires-a good one.
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Washing-
ton. NO 2-4588. )426B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-".88. Box,
39c; shorts, 89c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
A MEDIUM blue-grey gabardine suit.
Single breasted, sport style. Like new,
size 40 regular. Very reasonably pric-
ed. Call NO 3-1904 after 8 p.m. on
weekdays only. Ask for Steve. )299B
BATTERIES $5 EXCHANGE
Guaranteed - Free Installation
BATTERY STORES ASSOCIATION
Liberty and Ashley - NO 3-5113
)329B
MAN'S WRIST WATCH in good condi-
tion, repaired and cleaned, Merril, 17
jewel, originally $83.71-now $50. Up-
holstered reclining tapestry chair,
wooden arms and sliding footstools,
fair condition, $8.00. Folding baby pen
with pad, good condition, $15. Gray
folding baby buggy, chrome handle
with white plastic, hardly used, $50,
originally $89. Cosco baby high chair,
all chrome and steel with blue plastic
seat cover, adjustable foot rest, $16.
Folding nursery chair, $3. Majestic
portable radio with inside and out-
side aerial, $38. Large bathinet with
pad and lining, $8. Phone 2-9020.
) 392B
SMITH-CORONA Portable Typewriter in
perfect condition. 448 Michigan, W.
Quad. )413B
GUARANTEED SAFETY TESTED used
cars. University Motor Sales. 907 N.
Main. Ph. NO 3-0507. )374B
1950 CHEVROLET CLUB COUPE-Radio
and heater. Metallic green. Very nice
car. 222 W. Washington, Huron Mo-
tor Sales. NO 2-4588. )427B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
New Argus C-3's-$6.65 down, balance
monthly. Purchase Camera Shop,
1116 S. University, NO 8-6972. )418B

PARAKEETS AND SINGING CANARIES
-$8 each. Bird supplies and a few
cages. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S. 7th. )417B
1940 Lasalle with No. 8 Cadillac motor
in very good condition, radio, heater.
Complete car for $90, Motor $50. NO
2-9020. )415B
1951 FORD VICTORIA-Radio, heater,
and overdrive. Nice. $1095. Univer-
sity Motor Sales, 907 North Main.
Phone NO 3-0507. )419B
1953, 26-FOOT ELCAR TRAILER. Like
new, completo bathroom. Call NO
5-1978. )420B
1952 CHEVROLET BEL-AIRE, 2 tone
green, radio and heater and power
glide. 18,000 miles. Real nice. See
Benny. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )423B
1949 STUDEBAKER - 2 door, black
Champion, heater and overdrive. One
owner, very clean. See Smitty, Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )422B
1949 LINCOLN-4 door, automatic trans-
mission, radio and heater. New tires.
Will trade. Huron Motor Sales, 222
W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )425B
RECORDS-50 Classical LP's at % list.
NO 2-9185. )428B
TUXEDO-Almost New. 38 long, reason-
able. See evenings, 1550 Celar Bend.
)429B
FOR SALE-CUSTOM BUILT Hi-Fi set,
AM-FM Radio, 12" speaker, 3 speed
Webster changer. Modern type blond
cabinets. Call NO 8-8403. )430B
FOR RENT
GOOD SIZED, new attractive, well-fur-
nished basement suite for 2 or 3
men - preferably graduate students.
Private bath, garage space for car;
near two bus lines. Call NO 2-3618,
1615 Morton. )46C
GARAGE FOR RENT near South Quad.
Phone NO 3-8454. )47C
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Rooms by Day or Week
Campus Tourist Homes. 1h. NO 3-8454
518 E. Williams St. (near State)
)25D
DOUBLErROOM for rent, furnished,
very large. Will accommodate 2 stu-
dents-men only. $5.50 each. Call
NO 3-2225. )64D
PERSONAL
LIFE CAN BE cheap (8c). Student
Periodical, NO 2-3061. ) 99F

FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

MAKE $20.00 DAILY. Sell luminous
name plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass. Free sample and details.
)92H
STUDENT WIVES to do telephone so-
liciting. Student Periodical, NO 2-3061.
)89H
BUSINESS SERVICES
PIANO SERVICE - Tuning, repairing.
Work guaranteed. Call University Mu-
sic House, NO 8-7515. )271
RAD[O-PHONO-T.V.
Service and Sales.
Free Pick-up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
Ann Arbor Radio and T.V.
"Student Service"
1217 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
11 blocks east of East Eng. )401
TYPEWRITERSI Portable and Standard
for rent, sales, and service.
MORRILLS
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Buff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Ph. NO 2-9020. )21
HAIR REMOVED, NEVER GROWS BACK
-From face and body by SHORT
WAVE METHOD. Ann Arbor physi-
cians' references. Lucia Gagalis, Vogue
Beauty Salon, Ph. NO 8-8384. )422
DRESSMAKING - 25 years experience.
Ladies tailoring and alterations. Rea-
sonable prices. NO 3-3294. )451
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Phone NO 8-7590, 830
S. Main. )3x
WANTED TO BUY
GIRL'S English Bike-Good condition.
Call Peggy, 487 Jordan. )12J
WANTED TO RENT
LAW STUDENT and wife want 3 room
unfurnished apartment in vicinity of
law school for occupancy June 15.
Reply Box 7, Michigan Daily. )1OK
ARE YOU LOOKING for a responsible
couple to sub-let your living quar-
ters to, for the summer? Summer
faculty member with wife and 2
month old son need accommodations.
Please write: Dr. Israel Woronoff, 918
E. Kearsley St., Flint. )13K
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments. Ph.
NO 2-2678. 510 Catherine Street nest
State. Alta Graves.
NOW! _
IMUSICAL ADVENTURE OF THE DEStRTI

I

1

r,

LATE SHOW TONIGHT 11 P.M.

I
rid
julmommow

Law Banquet
onors Coif,
Scholarships
Senior editors of the Law Re-
view, newly elected members of
the Order of the Coif and schol-
arship winners were honored yes-
terday at the Law School's Hon-
ors Day banquet in the Union.
Dean E. Blythe Stason of the
Law School presented the Jerome
S. Freud Memorial Award to Har-
old A. Ruemenapp who graduated
in February as the highest rank-
ing man in his class. Ruemenapp
also received the Class of 1908
Law Memorial Award for main-
taining the highest scholarship in
his class through the freshman
and junior years.
DAVID W. BELIN and Theodore
J. St. Antoine received the Henry
M. Bates Award given on the basis
of scholarship, personality, char-
acter, extra-curricular activities
and promise of a distinguished
career.
The Samuel J. Platt Award
was won by James D. Voss for
his superior scholarship while
contributing to his own support.
Burton Abstract C o m p a n y
Awards were given to Howard A
Cole, and Alan R. Hunt on th
basis of need scholarship and ex-
tracurricular activities.
Highest ranking juniors receiv-
ing the Junior Class Prize Awards
were Eugene Alkema, Rinildo L
Bianchi and Robert B. Fiske.
SENIOR MEMBERS of the Law
Review's student editorial boar
honored were Theodore J. Stfl An.
toine, editor-in-chief and associate
editors David W. Belin, Paul B
Campbell, Samuel I. Shuman an
Marvin O. Young.
Assistant editors honored were
George B. Berridge, Howard A.
Cole, David D. Dowd, Jr., John
C. Hall, Alan R. Hunt, Con-
stantine D. Kasson, John H.
Leddy, Stephen J. Martin and
William E. Parmenter, Jr.
Other assistant editors were
Chester F. Relyea, John E. Rieker
Raymond R. Trombadore, J. Dav
id Voss, Richard S. Weinstein, Jud-
son M. Werbelow, Donald M. Wil-
kinson, Jr., Arthur M. Wisehar
and Richard W. Young.
Concluding the probram, Chie
Justice Charles C. Simons of th
U. S. Court of Appeals, Sixth Dis
trict, addressed the award win
ners, faculty and judges of th
Sixth District.

TRANSPORTATION

RIDE TO NORTHERN NEW YORK
through Buffalo, Syracuse, Water-
town, etc. Leaving 6 p.m. Thursday,
April 29. Returning for 8 a.m. classes
Mon. If interested call Dottie Sutter,
NO 3-1531, ext. 101. )72G

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