100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 21, 1954 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-04-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1954

. THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

PUBLICITY BIGGEST JOB:
Miehigras Co-chairmen Describe Work
4

Michiworm,
Other Stunts
Aid Publicity
By ROZ SHLIMOVITZ
"What's Michigras?"

Variety, Gayety, GrowthI
Mark Michigras History

if

Be Sure and

By ARLENE LISS
Co-chairing a "huge jeb such
as Michigras" can be strain, but
on the whole it works out very
well, co-chairmen Gretchen Meier,
'54, and Hal Abrams, '54, agreed.
Miss Meier explained that some-
times problems come up over
which they disagree, "but they're
small, there's no trouble on any-
thing big."
BOTH STUDENTS have a wide
experience which fitted them for
the year long job which they re-
ceived last May. Miss Meier was
parade chairman of Michigras two
years ago and has worked on Frosh
Weekend, Junior Girls' Play, Un-
ion Opera and the Fred Waring
show.
Abrams has worked on the
Union executive council, as cir-
culation manager of Generation
and as publicity chairman of the
Union.
"Publicity is our biggest job,"
Abrams said. He went on to ex-
plain that the central committee
has to make townspeople "aware
of how big Michigras is."
"Publicity covers a fifty mile ra-
dius," Miss Meier interjected. She
commented that a great deal of
work is connected with this public-
ity. Both she and Abrams have
been doing television and radio
shows.
"CHANNELLING" was described
by Abrams as a big problem. This
involves clearing Michigras proj-
ects with theUniversity and also
with city officials. "We have to
check with the police and fire de-
partments and other people," he
pointed out.
flew 9eature
Starting April 26th
INFANTS WEAR
Every Item for the 0
0 Well-Dressed Baby
c Come in and see our stock.
We invite you to our open-
house Monday, April 26th, 1:30
to 9:30 p.m. Special for the
month $5.00 discount to a Knit-
king buyer-door prize for the
day. c
YARN SHOP
324 East Liberty 0
Open 9 to 6 Closed Saturday
NO 2-7920 e
c -c--><:0=><-04

Approach any student on
publicity committee with1
question and you take your
in your own hands.

the
this
life

CENTRAL COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRMEN HAL ABRAMS
AND GRETCHEN MEIER

"Keeping the spirit drummed
up within our own group," is
another major pi-oblem encoun-
tered by the co-chairmen. Miss
Meier commented, however, on
the enthusiasm of the Central
Committee.
"I guess choosing the committee

was hard," Abrams remarked,
"we had to make certain they
worked well."
As regards the success of this
year's Michigras, the co-chair-
men have only one plea, "If the
weatherman will only give us de-
cent weather."

VIA TV, the newspapers, radio,
posters, window displays, con-
tests, leaflets and stunts, the pub-
licity committee has been drum-
ming up Michigras for the past
three months.
Aided by ' the cooperation of
the Michiworm, whose photoge-
nic features adorn most of the
publicity releases, the campaign
was easy to plan. Because all
the proceeds of Michigras go to
the Fresh Air Camp Fund, and
Swimming Pool Project Fund,
University officials and Ann Ar-
bor merchants were most coop-
erative.{
Recent talk of the campus has'
been what did or did not happen'
when the Michiworm invaded the
classroom. While bystanders re-
ported most of the freshman lec-
Meeting
There will be a meeting of all
float drivers at 7 p.m. today in
the Union.
ture rooms emptied immediately,
upperclassmen in most cases were
sceptical of the worm's dismissal
power.
Decked out in Michigras hats,
members of the central committee
picketed the movies Sunday, pa-
raded before the women's dorm's
and then frequented a local drink-
ing establishment which recently
held a day in Michgras' behalf.

By RONA FRIEDMAN
"A Twisted mass of canvas and
the tent poles," the results of a
storm that had raged all night,
greeted University students in 1909
only a few hours before their car-
nival was to open.
But the old adage "the show
must go on" prevailed and by
Tickets
General admission tickets for
Michigras are now on sale at
four campus locations: Mason
Hall, front of the Union, En-
gine Arch, and on the diagonal,
and in every campus housing
unit.
nightfall the big tents were again
erected on the carnival grounds
opposite Ferry Field, reported an
aged copy of The Daily.
* * *
THUS the 1909 "Union's Greater
Shows" which featured "salome
dancers, six performing elephants,
and Alvina the beautiful girl in
pink tights who would make the
daring 'slide for life' clinging by
only her teeth as she slid down a
taut wire from the top of the big
tent," among many other won-
derful attractions, was bound to
be a success despite the elements.
The original two day carni-
vals-for-a-good-cause first held
at the University in 1901 were
were sponsored by the Union. In
the beginning they were small
affairs, but by 1905 the county
fairs which were run by the
men's groups on campus had be-
come big business, offering en-
tertainment from professionals
as well as students. The funds
collected went to projects such
as the Michigan Union club
house and by 190& the carni-
vals were raising as much as
$4400.
The last "Great Union Fair"

Poster Committee Kept Busy
Selling Students on Michigras

was held in 1924 to raise money
for the Union pool. Two years lat-
er the women on campus backed
by the WAA tried their version of
a carnival on a penny scale. Suc-
cessful, the two day Penny Carni-
val was held annually for many
years in the Barbour and Water-
man Gymnasiums featuring shows
and games,
THEN an enterprising student
on campus, Willis Tomlinson, de-
cided that we should return to the
original large scale carnival and
presented his plan to many groups
on campus. Finally the WAA
agreed to sponsor his idea and the
first Michigras was held in 1936.
In 1948 it was decided to hold
the annual carnival, which by
then had assumed huge propor-
tions, every two years.

1 I

.I

As well as making the cut-out
figures now dotting the campus at
regular intervals, Michigras' poster
committee, headed by Sally Huber,
'54A&D, has kept occupied with a
variety of other publicity devices.
A recent visit to Michigras com-
mittee headquarters found her
committee constructing a ten foot
modernistic structure to appear on
the Diag as a final publicity meas-
ure.
* * *
MICHIGRAS, Miss Huber er-
plained, isn't limited to University
students; a poster contest was
held in high and junior high
schools to pulicize the affair. There
have also been window displays in
four local stores, a Bike Tag Day,
and a Michigras Sundae featured
on the menus of several restau-
rants in the vicinity.

On the publicity committee are
Chuck Bancroft, '55A&D, Jerry
Burns, '55A&D, Don Fleming, '55E,
Don Hanley, '55E, Joan Liddick,
Diane Plushnick, '55A&D, Gordon
Ryan, '55A&D, Doug Stewart
'55A&D, and Anita Wiesner.

rl

13

Imported Irish
Linen Jackets

This coat

combines all

the features of

for important styr exfras
your hof weatherhk
chsutosef a
choose a~l

excellent summer sport coating. The fabric
is imported from Ireland and is woven from
only the finest of linen yarns which gives
it a lighter "hand" and more wrinkle re-
sistant "body". Styled and tailored in our
own natural shoulder model it represents
the one sport coat well dressed men covet
for summer sports wear.
'3950.

"Y
:H
a
:
v'}
ti":
1Y'
Ri
:-X.
V
1ti
.+y
{
;F
:L
:.X
i)
Xll
:
Olt
Z::

>
: :
..,

s

pan Bovw"

I

OXXFORD CLOTHES

DOBBS H ATS

"COOLEW'

ANN A R B O R

1

Arrow Shirt $4.95

S TORE

H OU R S

D A I L Y

9 TO 5:3 0

Bronzini Ties

91NCE 1848._
WOLVERINE SHOES
High in quality-low in price

To the wrinkle-resist-
ance of 55% Dacron
and 45% Worsted fabric
Varsity-Town adds the
style extras of smartest
modeling, hand needled
edges on solid tones and
distinctive silk decora-
tion. on exclusive new
patterns.
$59.50

11

I

I

WILD BOARHIDE,

the ideal leather for

I

casual style shoes. Tough, durable, porous,
washable, smart looking. Shown in re-
versed buffed pig in loafers and crepe-soled
oxfords.

SAFFELL & BUSH, one of Ann Arbor's oldest and
finest retailers of men's quality clothing, shoes, and
furnishings. Leaders in men's apparel for over a
quarter century. Get that Look of Leadership for
your very own at

,.

:. f; z.

iIII

II I $095 -.,,9$1Iq95

i Yx3}:

III

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan