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March 18, 1954 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-03-18

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THUM&SDAY, MARCH 18, 1954
Bermuda Shorts for Men
Increase in Popular Appeal

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

LIKES AND DISLIKES:
Students Express Fashion Views

Values at Campus Bike & Hobby

By ELAINE EDMONDS
Men, despite a vigorous contro-
versy on the subject, have now
taken over the Bermuda walking
shorts which have been popular
with women in recent years.
They are only reclaiming what
is rightfully theirs, however, since
the style originated with the
shorts worn by Britishers and
members of the British army sta-
tioned in warm climates. This was
the origin of the name, Bermuda
shorts.
THIS TYPE of shorts has been
popular with both men and wom-
en at many eastern colleges for
several years. In some places in
the East Bermuda shorts have be-
come standard class dress for
women and are worn as street at-
tire by both men and women.
The fashion has slowly been
moving westward and the wom-
en at Michigan have been wear-
ing the shorts for several years.
The men, however, have not
been as quick to accept the fash-
ion, although a local store reports
that it has been carrying the
shorts for four or five years.

now accepting the style and in
the near future he expects to see
them being worn here at Michigan
both for lounging and for street
wear.
The Berumuda walking shorts
come in a variety of colors and
materials. They may be obtain-
ed either with or without pleats.
Very popular for this time of
year and on into late spring are
the wool flannel shorts. These
come in black, brown, light grey,
oxford grey and in plaids of navy
and red.
For summer wear men may se-
lect shorts in such cool washable
fabrics as striped seersucker, den-
im and cotton broadcloth.
* * *
THE seersucker shorts come in
either red or blue stripe on a white
background, while the denim
shorts may be obtained in red or
navy. The broadcloth shorts are
available in a wide variety of sol-
ids and plaids.

Men's View . .
By ROZ SHLIMOVITZ
Michigan men strongly vetoed
knee socks and placed Bermuda
shorts for women number two on
their "black list" recently when
asked, "What do you think of
women's fashions on campus?"
''Knee socks on college women,"
Dean Finkbeiner, '58, complained,
"make thin legs look thinner and
thick legs look thicker." "Be-
sides," he added, "this is not an
antarctic school."
* * *
VOICING a universal protest,
Lee Gunn, '58, reasoned, "They
cover up girls' legs."
Warren Singer, '57E, states,
"Bermuda shorts and those
socks just don't go," and re-
minded fashion-conscious coeds,
"They don't wear them in New
York."
Other replies range from "knee
socks are terrible" to "I don't see
why they should hide it."
Calmly sipping a milk shake,
"Hooch" MacMurdo, '57E, sudden-
ly advocated, "Burn up every pair
of Bermuda shorts on campus."
Although Tom Leopold, '55, ap-
proves of most coed fashions, he
remarked, "I can't see why they
wear Bermuda shorts in win-,
ter . .
ONE GRIPE aimed at quite a
few women on campus was sound-

A representative of a local mer-
chant specializing in men's cloth-
ing stated that there has been a
considerable demand for the walk-
ing shorts recently in Ann Arbor.
* * *
HE BELIEVES that men are

The plaid shorts have a
matching belt and shirt v. le
the solid-color shorts have a
shirt and belt of contrasting
plaid.
According to a local men's clo-
thier many of the light-weight
summer shorts have been sold
since Christmas to men going
south to Florida and Bermuda for
the winter season.

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ed by Bill Graham, '57, who dis-
approves of coeds wearing "those
blue tennis shoes."
Dave Shaub, '58E, who advis-
ed coeds to leave some of the
casual styles to the men explain-
ed, "My sister is always stealing
my shirts, socks, slacks, cash-
mere sweaters and two sweat
shirts."
"Ridiculous" is the way Sam
Marfia, '54NR, termed styles worn
today. "The 'kids' up here think
they have to dress in styles set in
magazines and movies." "The
next thing we'll see," he said, "is
raccoon coats and ukes."
Another student, Barry Brandt,
'55, criticized Paris-inspired fash-
ions. Brandt countered, "I don't
think the United States should be
as dependent on Paris for trends
as we are. American girls should
not imitate Paris fashions but
originate their own styles."
He also asserted that color is
more important than design. An
ordinary styled dress, pleasantly
colored, beats any other stylized
dress, he maintains.
WOMEN SHOULD get more
dressed up on dates, Don Jones,
'56E, and Bill Carleton, '56E said.
Jones backed up his point by stat-
ing that the men always wear a
jacket, white or sport shirt and
usually a tie Friday and Saturday
nights. He said it was not right
for women to wear saddle shoes
or loafers and their regular school
clothes.
Jim Lowell, '56Med., predicted
that if the current trend con-
tinues, women 20 years from to-
day will be wearing trousers.
It's "okay" with Lowell, however.
"We don't see enough suits,"
one student replied. "All I see is
jeans and sweaters," he said.
Not all men saw need to criti-
cize the styles. Berne Jacobs,
Grad, remarked, "I like the 'sim-
ple, neat look' the majority of
women and men on campus dis-
play." Others said styles were
"fine and classroom wear was
especially appropriate."

Women's View. . .
University coeds don't agree on
what the well-dressed male should
wear.
For every coed who preferred
khaki or gray flannel trousers,
there was another who opposed
these current favorites.
"I LIKE men to wear gray flan-
nel suits and striped ties," Rhoda
Mermelstein explained, "if they
look good in them." "It annoys
me," she continued, "to see every
fellow wearing the same thing to
look like a member of the Ivy
League.
Jan Goodman agreed. She
stated, "They dress very nicely
as long as they stay out of gray
flannels and striped ties, garb
that makes them all look alike."
Coeds had varied reasons for
disliking khakis. Ilene Pavlove,
'57, commented, "They're too
sloppy and baggy." In her opin-
ion slacks are much more appro-
priate for any occasion.
Connie Phelps, '57, suggested
that they "iron their 'sun tans'."
Students who liked khaki or
gray flannel trousers quickly
enumerated their favorite outfit.
Reflecting her eastern schooling
at Mount Holyoke, Ruth Langs,
'55, favors the khakis, "dirtybucks,
white shirt with V-neck sweater
combination.
"IF THEY'RE going to get
dressed up, I'd like to see them
dress all the way," Mary Jo Park,
'56, stated. "None of this jacket-
khaki combination," she added.
A number of coeds disliked
levis. Nancy Gmeiner remarked,
"No levis should be worn in
classes." Few people wear them,
she admitted, but "it's exasper-
ating." Generally, she conclud-
ed, "The men on campus are
well-dressed and take pride in
their clothes"
Carib Wenzel, '55, who is study-
ing to be a medical technician, re-
plied, "Levis are all right in lab-
oratory courses - but otherwise
they look awful."
Besides disliking levis, Martha
MacGregor, '55Ed, had another
objection, "T-shirts worn without
regular white shirts."
When asked what she thinks of
men's fashion, Nancy Barnes, '55,
thoughtfully replied, "They're too
ordinary, and they lack color and
imagination; none of them are
original."
Joan Kustodowich, '55Ed,
thought this was a major point in
their favor. In her opinion, wom-
en's clothes should be more like
men's, simple and plain.
"Styles for men ought to change
soon," advocates Paula Rizzo. "In
summer, men should be able to go
without jackets," she says, "and
wear Bermuda shorts to work."
"This," she notes, "would be good
for kveryone's morale."
Sally Steenhusen, '57SM, and
Gay Secor, '55L, objected to the
colored vests. Miss Steenhusen re-
marked, "The vests make men
look like 18th century characters."

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