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March 18, 1954 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-03-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 1954

Y
A

'Tickled

Pink

'To

Be

Premiered

Today

44

Senior Coeds To See
Debut Performance
Weeks of rehearsals, scenery-painting and costume-making will
culminate at 8 p.m. tonight when the 1954 Junior Girls' Play, 'Tickled
Pink,' is premiered before an audience of senior women.
In preparing for production of the traditional musical comedy,
junior women have weathered a number of crises of varying dimen-
sions.
Confusion over the summer among the members of the central
committee left the coeds with nothing more of their original script
than the basic idea.
Rising to the emergency, director Jill Coleman sat down
over Christmas vacation and wrote a new plot for the chosen
theme.
Misfortune again struck when dance chairman Jane Kohr injured
her knee in a skiing accident and hobbled around with her leg in a
cast for three weeks. However, her co-chairman, Joanne Lichty, took
over the necessary fast footwork while Miss Kohr assisted from the
sidelines.
After meeting these and other problems that always arise in
producing a play, the coeds will be ready tonight to present a comedy
about government inefficiency which revolves around a misplaced
atom bomb test and the problems arising as a result.
The history of JGP dates back to 1904 when six junior women
presented a skit which told the story of Buster Brown at Michigan.
Mrs. Myra Jorden, dean of women at the time, suggested that
the junior women present a play in honor of the graduating seniors.
Following her suggestion the coeds came up with "Everysenior," a
take-off on the old morality play, "Everyman."
Traditionally, only women were permitted to see the play but the
1907 production, "Don Quixote, the Coed Knight," marked the be-
ginning of male requests to be permitted to view the skit.
In an editorial in The Daily, the men protested: "The mascu-
line element of the campus resented being barred from the giay
little functions held under Mrs. Jorden's eye."
After 11 years of performing strictly for local audiences, in 1915
the women traveled to Toledo to present their skit, "The Come.Back."
This play gave the viewers a
glimpse of the University in 2002
as an institution for women only,
since all the men had left years
ago to fight in the World War. The
story dealt with the triumphant
g return of men to the University
after a fierce battle with the dean
of women.
The 1915 performance also
marked the introduction of the
custom of having senior women
attend the performance in a
group wearing their caps and
gowns, a tradition that was dis-
continued in 1952.
University men finally won their
fight to see the feminine produc-
tion in 1923 when they were per-
:. <'mitted to -watch "Jane Climbs a
Mountain."
For many years the JGP script
stuck to a college theme but in
1949 the long-standing tradition
was broken when the coeds pre-
sented "Fate of the Union."
In 1950 junior women again
found their theme away from
the college campus and produc-
ed "The Real McCoy," which
centered around the life of a
hillbilly girl who won a contest
and a free trip to New York.
For the third year in a row the
theme of the 1951 play was a more
cosmopolitan one than had been
the custom. That year's play, "It's
The Payoff," told the story of
four young women who must pro-
uth Sea life to a scientist who is duceya play in order to earn
owslung Fungus Island. Travel- money,
With the 1952 production,
of his own. The half-finished "Heavenly Days," the coeds revert-
ork and imagination on the part ed to a college theme for their
uctions as to what type of c- skit. The play followed the trials
whip up gay, gaudy outfits for and tribulations of two coeds at
d thread were transformed into the University of Michigan from
rehearsal deadline. 1870 to 1952.

I

V

I,

A ZOMBIE-Three scientists curiously test a fourth member of
their research group who has turned into a zombie on a native
island which they are studying. The scientist-turned-zombie set
out with the group to prove his theory that everyone is an
American Indian.

JGP DIRECTOR-Jill Coleman, director of this year's play, dis-
cusses some production problems encountered in the final weep
of rehearsals. Miss Coleman also wrote the script for the musical
comedy which deals with government inefficiency.

-t

NATIVE DANCFRS-Rehearsing one of their numbers in tonight's show are these dancers practicing the hula which is their specialty.
Natives on Lowslung Fungus Island, they provide one of the many, interesting sights for the team of government investigators who are
doing research on the effects of a misplaced atomic bomb. Traveling among the islands they encounter, besides the natives, many inter-
esting kinds of flora and fauna including pink and purple monkeys and pink trees with purple foliage.. In their scientific fervor, the
scientists collect data from the natives and expound many odd pet theories which they are hoping to. prove on this expedition.

.4

1 1 . ,,

I i1

DAILY PHOTO FEATURE
PICTURES BY BETSY SMITH
STORY BY PAM SMITH

THE
SUGAR BOWL
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST FOOD
109-111 SOUTH MAIN ST.

i

'JUST THE FACTS'-Carefree natives are giving the facts on Sou
studying the effects of a misplaced atom bomb on the natives of L
ing among the natives, he is gathering data to prove a pet theory
costumes of the natives worn at this rehearsal represent weeks of w
of the costumes committee members. After receiving general instri
tumes were wanted the coeds gave free rein to their imaginations to
the many members of the cast. Yards and yards of material and
appropriate costumes by'a bevy of coeds working to make the dress

-_li '',

READ AND USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

1

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5

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At right: The ensemble suit that goes
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