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March 18, 1954 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-03-18

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MARCH 18, 1954,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE. F"

MARCH 18, 1854 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE. ,'fl~

... ,,.

I

Coeds Predict
mpie, Longe
By MARLENE KELAVOS
Coeds will let their hair down
' this spring, moderately anyway.
Leading hair stylists say the
trend is toward slightly longer and
simpler hairdos.
After the extreme styles featur-
ed recently, i.e., pony tails, shin-
gled bobs, poodle cuts, and Italian
boys cuts, many women will be
happy to know that the hair-do's
are taming down. The future
points towards femininity without
frivolity, and neatness without se-
verity.
A New York hair stylist has in-
troduced a "Botticelli angel cut"
to complement the princess styles
and the Empire waistline in dress
fashions. The hair is brushed back
from the face, slightly waving,
with carefully arranged half-curls
accenting the back.
This season's variation of the
cap cut features slight curls over
the ears, breaking the severity of
such a coiffure.
Two other summer innovations
are "chop-chop" and the "Nina."
To create these cuts the hair is

MUVEHL1G &
Spring (
and Picnic
OUR MOTTO: "TF
311 Sou
Phone N

ed To Wear Professor
r Hair Styles
shaped and molded to the head in
layers to capture a casual neatness.
Fashionable Parisian women
will be wearing the new winged
hair styles, bringing width to the 1,
head, while diminishing the size
of the facial features.f
This inspiration comes from
several sources, birds and butter-F
flies, but mostly from airplanes f
which are the natural travel med-
ium of the modern woman.'
The position of the winged
movement is described as the
"flight line" and a rounded effect
at the back curves the hair low
on the neck in an enveloping u
movement. A smaller face canĀ£
carry the curls better over the
ears
Such a style lends itself for
jeweled ornaments in the shapes
of flowers, birds, and the butter- o
fly which can be wound about the.
hair, for evening wear.'
If their hair is fine and tends toy
"fly away," most women are wise
to caution their stylist to give
special consideration and style a3
simple hair-do.,
LAN PH EAR 'BALANCE YOUR BUDGET'-P
program director for the Surve
"It's all a matter of habit when
C..a mpingpeople can make their budgetv
how strict they are."
Equipment FASHIONS FOR MEN:
HE GOLDEN RULE" Lightweight
th Main Featured for
O 2-3277 By MARY HELLTHALER
Dacron or orlon and wool com-
binations seem to be the up-and-
coming trend in men's spring and
summerweight suit fabrics, be-
cause of their durability and
shape-retaining qualities.
New S ring ut', A new type of summerweight
S pr suit of dacron material can be
washed and hung up to dry, with
no ironing necessary. This fabric
is very resilient, enabling it to
resist wrinkling and recover quick-
ly from enforced creases. It does
not readily soak up water, so it
remains well-pressed looking in
humid and even wet weather.
r " "
CHARCOAL gray flannels with
flap pockets, single-breasted with
two buttons seems to be a favor-
ite, as are rayon and nylon cords
with patch pockets, two buttons
and full linings.
Besides the "baby" cords in
y, fresh spring clothes, a pret. brown and blue tiny stripes,
ty, seersucker with larger and wider
stripes are in style.
specialize in hair styling. Let Two other new fabrics are pop-
help you find the right one. lin, a cotton, and chero cloth,
which resembles shantung with
a smoother quality.
For semi-formal wear a navy
blue sheen gabardine, single-
breasted with two buttons and
patch pockets is available.
TS - OBSERvATORY LODGE IN A RAYON, nylon, acetate.
University Hospital and mohair combination are suits
with a practical flair. Two pairs
O 2-3413 of trousers are provided, each in
a different color.

Advises Developing Habit
Of Planning Expenditures

ffers Suggestions on Budgeting

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--Daily-Don Campbell

Prof. James N. Morgan, assistant
y Research Center, believes that
it comes to budgeting," and "few
work all the time, regardless of

I -F
Ga
We
The Ohservaso
1402 WAsHINGTON HEIGH
1 block from the 1
Phone N'

Suits of Dacron
Spring Wear
One matches the jacket, while
the other is of a harmonizing
shade. With a separate sports
jacket, this ensemble furnishes
a varied wardrobe.
One type of lightweight suit
now available in local stores has
a three-button jacket with flap
pockets, over-lapped seams, a
hooked center back vent and nat-
ura shoulders. The trousers have
a plain top with no pleats.
Other fabricsfeatured in the
springweight suits are all wool
tropical worsteds, silks, silk and
cotton blends, silk and wool com-
binations, flannels, and light
tweeds. Silks are becoming very
popular for the Spring season.
* * *
THE FASHIONABLE after din-
ner attire includes dark trousers
with a single-breasted, white trop-
ical worsted with a shawl collar.
Sport coats are being fea-
tured in a great variety of colors,
weaves, and fabrics in the local
stores.
Two unusual types include a
blue denim jacket with a choice
of silver or white buttons, and an
imitation linen in white or black
with two buttons and flap pockets.
A center back vent instead of side
vents, two instead of three but-
tons on a single breasted suit seem
to be the style now.
ALSO POPULAR in the sports
coat line are nubby tweed fabrics
and a scatter weave pattern which
resembles tweed in light grays
and browns with patch pockets.
There is a new hair cloth con-
sisting of camel hair blends, and
a linen weave in a bold variety
of colors. Linen and cotton
cords, lightweight imported wool
jerseys, and pure silks are fa-
vorite buys in all the basic
- colors.
Slacks made of wool and dacron
or wool and orlon are very popular
because they are wrinkle-resistent.
The most popular shades in tropi-
cal worsteds are oxford gray, black
and brown.

By SUE GARFIELD
"It's all habit," says Professor
James N. Morgan, assistant pro-
gram director of the Survey Re-
search Center, "when it comes to
budgeting."
"The big trouble with University
students is that they don't know
what the money standards are,
and are never sure whether they're
spending too much," he comment-
ed in an interview.
Students are known to spend
"too much," especially when the
yearly epidemic of spring fever
hits the campus. The new spring
wardrobe that "Jill Campus"
doesn't really need, that extra
movie she has already seen twice
or the expensive birthday gift she
is buying "Joe Campus," when he
would be just as happy with some-
thing "small"-that's where the
money goes !
Paychecks help the "spend-
spree," as well over one third of
the University students will ver-
ify. A paycheck is a reward for
service, and whether it's deliver-
ed by a messenger, passed
through a pay-window, comes
in a white, yellow or brown en-
velope or no envelope at all,
it's always a thrill.
The paycheck endorsed to "Jill
or Joe Campus" canbe and should
be an investment in the future as
well. It can be a matter of pride
and productivity-or the opposite,
Professor Morgan said. The in-
vestment may not be in the form
of a bank balance, it may be, in-
stead, a socially and intellectually
well-rounded education with a de-
gree after 4 to 7 years.
According to Professor Morgan,
"We live in a money society." Ev-
eryone's out for the fast buck," the
man in the street believes, and no
one disputes the statement too ve-
hemently.
"The generality of American
people, commented Professor
Morgan, "are preoccupied with
and usually worried about the fi-
nancial aspects of living-the rent,
the mortgage, the spring ward-
robe, the payments on the car or
television set, the insurance pre-
miums, college tuition, salary
raise, the price of a spring or sum-
mer vacation - society is under
constant pressure of 'keeping up
with the Jones'.' Similarly, 'Jill
and Joe Campus' must keep up
with their contemporaries."
Professor Morgan thinks that
the best time to save money for
future uses is the intermitent pe-
riod between graduation and
"wedding bells." "Few students
save enough to bother with," he
said, "during their undergraduate
days."
Professor Morgan spent his
undergraduate days at North-
western University and then
went on to Harvard, where he
received his master's degree be-
fore the war and Ph.D. in 1947.
His interest in expenditure rec-
ords and economics was motivated
by his teaching-fellow experience
at Harvard in 1940-42 and at
Brown Unversity in 1947. He is
now instructing Economics 191,
consumer economics, in the spring
semester and a general survey
course each fall.
Professor Morgan spends the
majority of his time at the Survey
Research Center working on ex-
penditure records. The Center
helps to put out a 500-table book
of public expenditures for the Fed-
eral Reserve Board each year; it
is expected the next issue will be
published next week.
He finds the people in general
are in favor of the installment
credit plan and that few families
keep accurate budgets. Many use
the "run-out-of-money" plan, tak-
.ing a certain amount of funds out

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4
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of savings each month, and spend-
ing no more than that.
The professor, though occupied
with his time-consuming tasks at
the Research Center, finds time
to devote to his three children:
ages one, four and six.
Professor Morgan observed
that, even in his own family, the
strict budget has to allow leeway
for the unusual purchases, ex-
cessive doctor bills and vaca-
tions. "Most people have too
many exceptions," he explained.
In a chapter on "social conse-
quences of consumer decisions
about spending, saving and in-
vesting" in "Consumer Choices,"
Professor Morgan's book, he points
out that depressions, wars, infla-
tion and development in the fine
art of getting people to spend
their money, all make it difficult
to save enough for everyday needs,
much less an independent retire-
ment fund.
"America has a very high stan-
dard of living compared to the rest
of the world," he commented, "so
that insofar as we don't save
enough, it can be argued that this
is a matter of deficient willpower,
or rather 'won't power,' rather
than deficient income.

50% REDUCTION
" Pressing WHILE-U-WAIT
" 2-Hour Cleaning
Star Cleaners & Laundry

COED SPECIAL
PLEATED SKIRTS

I

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ARGYLE SOCKS
R UGMAKING
NEEDLEPOINT
KNITTING EQUIPMENT

YARNCRAFT SHOP
10 NICKELS ARCADE
1i1 ..-

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NO 8-9501

CLEANED AND

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Add SUNSHINE to your
NEW SPRING CLOTHES
at P
WESTINGHOUSE3
LAUNDRKOMAT
Keep In Times With Spring With
FRESH CLEAN CLOTHES
Washed Econonically and Rapidly
at
WestinghoumsesSltaundromat
510 East Williams Street NO 3-5540

PRESSED

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COLOR accented with WHITE

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fort Aniline dyed for the richest lookl

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