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September 16, 1953 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1952

- THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

PAGE SEVEN

Studen
Ann Arbor is filled with the
type of entertainment features
that only a college community can
offer.
Lectures, concerts, plays and
fine movies are available in abun-
dance and many are provided free
of charge.
Sports, dances and house par-
ties fill out the calendar for re-
creation seeking students, fresh
from a long session with the books.
MOST LIVING groups, whether
they be fraternities, sororities,
co-op houses, or dormitory units,
throw out the welcome mat with
parties at least every month. Dur-
Ing the football season, student
parties are more plentiful.
Nearly every week some large
campus organization throws a
dance for any terpsichoriali
atinded students. Traditional1
highlight of the year is the
J-Hop; a formal dance with big
name orchestras, held betweena
semesters.
For the less ambitious, there are1
five movie houses in the city which
provide. every type of cinematic
offering. Aside from the two com-i
mercial theaters on the campus,
the Student Legislature operatesY
a Cinema Guild which shows eith-e
* * *

Life-Classroom

by

Day,

Entertainment

at

Night

.

m C

# " A

* * *

i

er foreign films or revivals of well
known Hollywood movies. It op-
erates generally only on weekends.

livan
sored

operas and dramas spon-
by the Inter-Arts Union.

IN DOWNTOWN Ann Arbor,
one theater provides low priced B
films, revivals, and occasional A
pictures, while another offers ex-
cellent foreign and art movies.
Drama flourishes throughout
the year. The speech depart-
ment produces student-acted
plays regularly and in co-opera-
tion with the music school, puts
on two student-sung operas a
year. In the spring the Ann Ar-
bor Drama Season brings Broad-
way stars to campus to act in
hit plays.
The Arts Theatre Club, a local
professional acting company, stag-
es "theater in the round" produc-
tions at their third floor play-
house downtown. Specializing, in
a wide variety of rarely produced
plays, they have attracted a wide
following among students and
townspeople.
* * * -
ADDED TO these are the var-
ious student sponsored shows such
as the Junior Girls Play, the all-
male Union Opera, Student Play-
ers productions, Gilbert and Sul-
* * *

!

Music minded students can
have ; field day choosing which
concerts to attend. Besides the
concerts provided by the Uni-
versity Musical Society-includ-
ing the Choral Union Series, the
Extra-Concert Series, The Mes-
siah, the Chamber Music Fes-
tival and the May Festival --
there are frequent recitals by
faculty and students of the
School of Music. The Univer-
sity's own Stanley Quarter plays
a regular series of works from
the chamber repertory.
Students groups, such as Glee
Club, Symphony Orchestra, Band,
and other choral groups, take on
the most ambitious projects for
their regular concerts.
* * *
IN MARCH, the Inter-Arts Un-
ion puts on the Student Arts Fes-
tival, a three day gala event which
takes in all students artistic work,
including music.
Lectures come with such fre-
quency that attending them all
would be practically a full-time
occupation. I
In addition to departmental
lectures - which are free -- there

is the Oratorical Associations lec-
ture series, bringing well-known
speakers from all over the world.
IF YOU aren't 21, tavern life is
pretty well out because most of
the taverns keep a sharp eye out
for abusers of the state liquor
laws.
And the University liquor laws
prohibit drinking on campus or
in University housing, so you'll
have to stew in your coke 'til that
famed 21st birthday.
For those loaded with identifi-
cation, there are several bars
downtown where you can get
beer and wine, but Washtenaw
County is dry (no liquor by the
glass) so you have to adjust your
taste to beer.
If you tire of all these offerings,
there's always the Arboretum, if
you have a girl. The Arboretum,
University-owned, is some sever-
al hundred acres of wooded hills,
absolutely unlit.
'U' Publishes
Guidebook
For Students

Huron Land
Site of New
' U' Campus
(Continued from Page 1)
round an out door court yard.
The planting of trees and flow-
ers in the courtyard was com-
pleted during the summer ses-
sion.
Haven Hall is devoted to the
offices of literary college faculty
while Mason Hall contains row
upon row of classrooms whose
large windows overlook the cam-
pus.
s C C
ALONG WITH classroom and
office buildings, four large modern
auditoriums have also been ap-
pended to marble fronted Angell
Hall. Four million dollars in state
funds were appropriated to foot
the bill for the entire project.
The largest of the University
summer session construction
projects was the expansion and
revamping of the Natural Sci-
ence Building.
Returning students will find the
Natural Science Auditorium com-
pletely overhauled with the many
levels of the old ceiling replaced
with one overhead level. A new
movie projection box and new
flooring and lighting system have
also been added and all of the
seats have been ripped out and
replaced.
The forty year old structure
has been provided with two new
elevators and an expanded library.
A women's swimming pool which
will take up the first floor of,
a Women's Physical Education
Building is now under construc-
tion. If the building plans con-
tinue according to schedule the
pool should be ready fof dips by
students returning from Christmas
vacation. The rest of the building
will be constructed later.

BUSY NOTE TAKERS COMPRISE MAIN PART OF UNIVERSITY'S EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

Forty-six leaflets in the Uni-
versity's award winning "Guide-
book for Planning an Education
at the University" have now been
published, the Admissions Office
has announced.
The leaflets, which describe oc-
cupations and careers along with
University courses which prepare
for them, are bound in looseleaf
notebooks and distributed to high
school counselors and libraries. In-
dividual leaflets are sent to stu-
dents upon request, or may be
picked up in the Admissions Of-
fice.,
TWELVE OF the fifteen Univer-
sity schools and colleges are rep'-
resented by one or more leaflets
published to date, while others
deal with specific departments,
areas, housing, finances, ROTC
and student life.
According to Clyde Vroman, Di-
rector of Admissions, the guide-
book will be an invaluable aid in
explaining University facilities and
programs for counselors and pros-
pective students.
Champion of bicycles .., bicycle lof champions

ISA Foreign
StudentsClub
International understanding and
cooperation are the aims of the
programs sponsored by the Inter-
national Student Association.
The ISA represents the 900 for-
eign students on campus and
works directly with the Interna-
tional Center. It is well known to
all students as sponsor of. the all-
campus dances each year, the In-
ternational Ball and the Monte
Carlo.
ORIENTATION week plans are
extensive for the foreign students
as organized by the ISA to assist
the students in adjusting to the
new campus environment. Special
meeting and programs have been
planned in addition to the mixers
and teas. Attendance by both the
foreign and American students at
these programs is encouraged by
the International Center and the
ISA.

>(0 '. ,X : t : U ~ e )i t' =t ')G !
0 BREAKFAST
0 LUNCH
0 FOUNTAIN SERVICE
n: "where students meet-
i to chat and eat"
BETSY Ross SHOP
- in Nickels Arcade

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University of Michigan Oratorical Association
1953-54 LECTURE COURSE
Presents a Program of Wor-ld Celebrities
SEVENSTELLAR ATTRACTIONS
October 15 HON. CHESTER BOWLES
Recent Ambassador to India
"OUR BEST HOPE FOR PEACE IN ASIA"
October 30 TYRONE POWER, ANNE BAXTER
and RAYMOND MASSEY
and large supporting cast in the brilliant dramatization of
Stephen Vincent Benet's
"JOHN BROWN'S BODY"
November 11 HON. TRYGVE LIE
First Secretary-General of the U.N.
"HOW TO MEET THE CHALLENGE OF OUR TIMES"
February 9 HANSON BALDWIN
Military Editor of the N. Y. Times
"WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?"
February 18 MRS. ALAN KIRK
Wife of Adm. Kirk, Former Ambassador to Russia
"LIFE IN MOSCOW TODAY"
March 2 HON. HERBERT BROWNELL, JR.
Attorney General of the United States
"OUR INTERNAL SECURITY"
March 24 AGNES MOOREHEAD
and ROBERT GIST
Stars of stage and screen in
"SORRY, WRONG NUMBER" and other dramatic selections
SEASON TICKET PRICES-Main Floor, $7.50-First Balcony $6.50

I.

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