100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 16, 1953 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 195S

CENTRAL RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATION:

SRA Includes 24 Different Campus Faiths

SEVEN YEARS OLD:
Phoenix Project Aims
To Probe Atomic Energy

* *

* *

Another semester's program of
religious and social activities will
be inaugurated this fall by the
Student Religious Association.
Roused in a red brick building
on State Street called Lane Hall,
SRA represents the interests of
all faiths and cultures on campus.
It is the central organization for
24 religious groups.
ALL UNIVERSITY students are
entitled to participate in the as-
sociation's activities, and to use
Lane Hall facilities, including a
library, music room, auditorium,
kitchen, meeting rooms, and
SRA's fall program will in-
clude a church night the Friday
of orientation week, and an open
house at Lane Hall the follow-
ing Saturday night.
Religious Emphasis Week also
sponsored by. SRA will feature
speakers and panels on the subject
"Religion as a Molding Force in
Society." Well known faculty
members will discuss the affect of
religion occupations, community,
and scientific inquiry. Religious
Emphasis Week will be held dur-
ing October and November.
SRA is the coordinating group
for the various University student
religious groups.
THE NEWMAN CLUB is the
campus organization of Catholic
students. Under the guidance of
Rev. Fr. Frank J. McPhillips, the
club is a part of St. Mary's Stu-
dent Chapel.
Throughout the year it conducts
an active educational and social
program with classes in Catholic
doctrine, Scholastic philosophy,
Church History and Scripture and
an open forum discussion, and
with social events on Friday and
Saturday.
B'NAI B'RITH Hillel Founda-
tion serves as the religious center
for Jewish students.
Ender the direction of Rabbi
Hershel Lymon, the group spon-
sors forums, religious activities,
and welfare drives. It also offers
a program of lectures, socials
and Friday evening services.
The new foundation building
provides a large loung, a music
room with a collection of classical
records, a library of Judaica, a
chapel auditorium and a photo-
graphic darkroom.
THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE or-
ganization has its headquarters at
Lane Hall and holds meetings
every Tuesday night.
Among its activities are the
sponsorship of two lectures on
Christian Science each year and
the keeping of a reading room,
off the Lane Hall library.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS Christ
of Latter Day Saints (Mormons)
(Headquarters, Salt Lake City)

directed by Eugene A. Ransom.
Some of its weekly activities are,-
a Sunday morning discussion
group complete with coffee and
doughnuts, and a supper, fellow-r
ship program Sunday night. So-
cial activities are planned everyj
Friday evening and during the
week the lounge, the Pine Room,
and practice rooms of the Wesley
Foundation are open for relaxa-
tion and study. The Guild also
sponsors a student co-op whichj
prepares and serves noon and eve-
ning meals.
THE WESTMINSTER GUILD ISL'S HOME
is the student organization of theL' H
Presbyterian Church. All studentsI
are invited to share its activities- Spk
Sunday morning worship, Student '
Bible seminar and Guild meetings.
THE YOUNG FRIENDS FEL- r Jtuaen
LOWSHIP meets at Lane Hall. Its
activities include work parties to
sion groups, vacation work campsB odle
and fellowship and recreation.

x

It was nearly seven years ago
that the Student Legislature went
on record as favoring a "function-
al war memorial to the World
War II dead, thus laying the seed
for the Phoenix Memorial Re-
search Project.
In the wake of the war, the
Project was conceived as a living
tribute to its heroes, dedicated to
the study of peace-time potentials
and implications of atomic energy.
* * *
IT WAS almost nine months
after the initial SL resolution was
passed before the memorial idea
was given official sanction. Then,
in September, 1947 the University
Regents named a faculty-student
War Memorial Committee.
A month later they had adopt-
ed the suggestion of prominent
alumnus Fred J. Smith, a New
York publisher who proposed
the research be devoted to the
study of atomic potential in the
realm of peaceful activity.
By May of 1948 the inevitable
Washington red tape had been
cut, and with final Regents' ap-
proval, the road was cleared for
the Project's emergence.
* * *
PHOENIX head, Dean Ralph A.
Sawyer, of the graduate school,
and his staff began in 1949 on a
borrowed operating budget of
$25,000. In that year Phoenix
granted a total of $6,400 to in-
dividual researchers to explore
various atomic areas.
During the year 1952-53 $555,-
692.56 was spent by the Phoenix

project on research, operations
and construction.
This has come about with the
aid of an immense general fund
campaign, the first in University
history, held in 1950 and 1951
which has raised to date in excess
of seven million dollars.
About one to one and a half
million dollars of this money will
be used to build a memorial lab-
oratory building on the Univer-
sity's new North Campus.
The new structure will house
the University's two large "atom
busting" machines and biological
research activities that use ra-
diation too powerful to be per-
sued in campus buildings.
* * *
ONE AND A half million dol-
lars of Phoenix funds has come
from the General Motors Corpora-
tion to support an Institute of In-
dustrial Health for the study of
present-day health problems in
industry.
The Ford Motor Co. has also
contributed one million dollars
for the construction of a niclear
reactor on the North Campus.
Phoenix Project money is also
supporting isotope research in five
different colleges and ong research
institute and through one large,
interdepartmental research- pro-
ject on plant growth.
With the help of the fund of
over $100,000 contributed in nem-
ory of Dean Alice Crocker Lloyd,
the Project is about to enter the
cancer research field.

sponsors Sunday School and Sac-
rament services in the Michigan
League Chapel and Fireside meet-
ngs on Sunday evenings in Lane
Hall.
The NAUVOO LEAGUE, student
group of the reorganized Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day
Saints . (Headquarters, Indepen-
dence, Mo.) has regular meetings
in . conjunction with the local
church.
CONGREGATIONAL AND DIS-
CIPLES Guild includes students
from Congregational - Christian
churches and Christian Churches
(Disciple of Christ). Sunday eve-
ning meetings are held in either
the Congregational Church or the
Memorial Christian Church. A
supper is followed by a program
of speakers, panels, student dis-
cussions or forums and a worship
service.
Weekday activities center at
the Guild House which is open
to all students for chapel medi-
tation, library browsing, and
studying.
THE EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION has a full program
of worship, study of religion and
social problems, service to church
and community, and fellowship.
Religious services are held in con-
junction with St. Andrew's Parish.
Other .activities are conducted in
Canterbury House, the Episcopal
Students Center.
EVANGELICAL AND REFORM-
ED GUILD invites students to
make Bethlehem Church their
church home and to participate in

THE CHINESE CHRISTIANj
LANE hALL FELLOWSHIP is an organization t
of Chinese students wishing to
Headquarters of SRA provide opportunities for Chris-j
tian worship, helping to meet the
that church's activities. The Stu- which generally include an in- personal needs of Chinese studentss
dent Guild meets Sundays at 7 formal supper and time for recrea- in America, and furthering mu-!
p.m. for discussion and fellow- tion Sundays at 7:30 p.m. at Lane tual understanding and friend-,t
ship. The group holds several so- Hall are intermingled with social ship between the Chinese andf
cial events during the year. activities, parties and outings. American people. Activities in-
GRACE BIBLE student Guild THE ROGER WILLIAMS GUILD dude folk dancing, sports, and
meets at 6:15 p.m. Sundays for is connected wit hthe First Bap- monthly Chinese dinner. :1
social and discussion sessions. tist Church and led by Rev. C. H. THE ORTHODOX STUDENTS.1
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSO- Loucks. Some of the Guild's ac- SOCIETY is affiliated with the}
CIATION is the local unit of the tivities include. a 'Midweek Chat" Greek Orthodox Church of North
National Lutheran Council and every Wednesday and a party on and South America. Under the j
meets every Sunday evening. It Fridays. guidance of Rev. Lambros Vaka- '
holds Tuesday evening discussions, THE UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN lakis, this year the club will spon-'<
Wednesday evening coffee hours CHAPEL is an organization of sor a variety of religious, educa-
and weekend social events. students wishing to take part ac- tional and social programs. Everyf
MICHIGAN CHRISTIAN FEL- tively in the running of their Monday evening open house is
LOWSHIP, affiliated with the In- church. Students gain experience held where students may listen
tervarsity Christian Fellowship is as organists, choir members and to records, talk, play bridge or
an organization of Protestant stu- directors, soloists, and ushers in pingpong.
dents who subscribe to the faith the Sunday and special services. BAHA'I is the newest religious
of historic Christianity. The chapel has its own elected organization on campus.
Group activities include week- Executive Committee and is dir- INTER GUILD, composed of the
ly Sunday programs and tea, ected by Alfred T. Scheips: seven primary Protestant student
Wednesday Bible study and such GAMMA DELTA, the Interna- groups on campus, works with
social events as parties, picnics, tional Association of Lutheran Col- other religious groups in SRA and
and hikes. lege, and University Students is promotes cooperation and under-
MOSLEM STUDENT ASSOCIA- connected closely with the Uni- standing among its members. It
TION includes students from all versity Lutheran Chapel. Its main sponsors weekend "retreats", pack-
over the Moslem world. It cele- activity is a Sunday supper pro- ing parties for relief, and The
brates Holy Days, holds monthly gram. World Student Day of Prayer, all'
worship services, helps Moslem THE WESLEYAN GUILD is an of which are carried out through
students from various countries to organization of Methodist students its different committees.-
get acquainted and shares infor-
mation about Islam with students
of other faiths. It brings lectures H ealth S ervice Provides Care
and representatives of the Faith
to th ecampus. Regular Friday
prayer is held weekly at Lane Hall. For 400 Students Every ay
UNITARIAN STUDENT GROUP
sponsors a program of discussion
and forums on the important so- More than 400 University stu- complete physical check-up is a
cial, political and campus issues dents pass through the doors of chest X-ray for tuberculosis.
of the day. Serious meetings, the Health Service daily during Each student is then assign-

(Continued from Page 1)
tuted by SL will be either serious-
ly curtailled or dropped. It has
been studied by the University lo-
cally for several months and some
sort of report is expected this fall.
Another stumbling block has been
the lack of action' from the Uni-
versity on the Legislature's rec-
ommendations concerning the a c-
celarated exam period. It also ap-
pears that another program of the
Legislature, the Thanksgiving hol-
iday is in danger of being revoked.
On trial for two years, the holi-
day will be revoked if students con-
tinue to miss classes the Wednes-
day before Thanksgiving.
The Student Legislature oper-
ates principally on two levels,
the elect group, and the ad-
ministratde wing. Anyone who
wishes to run for SL may, so
long as he or she is enrolled in
the University. The election is
run on the Hare system in which
the voter lists his choices in
numerical order and thus can
vote for as many people as he
wishes.
The administrative wing is made
up of volunteers who assist in the
actual running of the various pro-
jects that SL sponsors. Every stu-
dent who has any spare time is
urged to try out for this staff.
In the coming year, the Student
Legislature has several projects in
mind in addition to the Homecom-
ing dance, book exchange, Cinema
Guild and regular activities.

STUDENTS
Welcome to Michigan
and Ann Arbor from.

KEG

BEER

DRIVE THROUGH
* BEER a WINE * SOFT DRINKS
Open daily 10 A.M. - 10 P.M. Sundays noon to 7 P.M.

-9

*

*

*

*

*

A- :i

THREE LOCATIONS

the winter 'sessions.
One of the first and best stu-
dent health centers in the United
States, the Health Service on
Fletcher Ave. looks after the health
of thousands of University stu-
dents.
BEFORE A student can register
for the first time at the University,
he must first pass a stiff physical
examination given during Orien-
tation Week and lasting from one
to four hours. Included in this
Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS,
at
BARGAIN PRICES

ed to a regular staff physician
for consultation during the year,
but if the services of a special-
ist are required, the student will
be referred to one of the Health
Service's specially-equipped de-
partments.
Bed care is regularly given in
the 60-bed infirmary on the third
floor of the Health Service Bldg.
PHYSICIANS from the medical
school and University Hospital
work - in close cooperation with
Health Service whenever students
need attention of additional spec-
ialists.
Advice relating to questions of
health is available at the Health
Service, staffed and equipped to
deal not only with physical
health problems, but also with
those concerning mental hy-
giene.
This division assists students to
correct faulty"social adjustments,
to acquire proper study habits, or
to overcome worries over personal
and family troubles when such sit-
uations interfere with normal suc-
cess in their studies.

ATTENTION STUDENTS
SCHOOL OPENING SPECIAL
$500 Down Delivers the
NEW 1953 ROYAL PORTABLE

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE:

EASY
TERMS

$20 Trade-In Sale
Your old portable regardless of
age or condition (4 row key-
board and back spacer) is
worth $20 when you purchase
this new ROYAL.

MAIN OFFICE

roo CORNER OF HURON

& MAIN STREETS

1

19

UNIVERSITY CAMPUS
VICINITY
r 330 SOUTH STATE ST.
Nickels Arcade
v' 1108 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVE.
Opposite the Campus at Each End of the

12 MONTHS TO PAY
HEADQUARTERS for PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
ALL TYPEWRITERS ARE "FAIR TRADED"
We offer the same prices as in your home town. Buy here and
get the advantage of our guarantee and convenient service.
ROYAL - SMITH-CORONAS - REMINGTONS
FOREIGN KEYBOARDS AVAILABLE
RENT A TYPEWRITER
$4.00 per Month - Three Months $10.50

II

1

e.

Diagonal
SDDD

A T M

D A nu[

All Kinds of Gifts, Novelties,
Greeting Cards, and Costume Jewelry

11

11

i

.I

I

m

I ,

I

i

I

'I

,,

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan