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January 15, 1954 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-01-15

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AY, JANUARY 15, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREX

~Y, JANUARY 15, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE
'I

NEW LOOK FOR TELEVISION:
Remodeled Video Studio Plans Opening
By WALLY EBERHARD t----

Economists To Evaluate
Survey Aid to Business

Television has a new home at
the University. After extensive-
and expensive-remodeling oper-
ations, the University television
studio on South Maynard St. is
preparing for spring semester stu-
dent preparation of video pro-
grams. Formal opening will be held
between semesters.
* * *
THE MODERN studio contrasts
sharply with the crowded facilities
of a converted classroom in Angell
Hall which formerly served as lab-
oratory and workshop for students
interested in a television career.
Although the University does
not have its own transmitter fa-
cilities, cooperation with a local
TV. station presently gives two
hours of program time for stu-
dent-produced shows.
Programs include three weekly
newscasts, a children's story hour,
panel discussions and interviews
and a variety of other programs.
Shows are written, produced and
directed by students in television
courses of the speech department
in cooperation with other depart-
ments.
PROF. GARNET A. Garrison
acts as station manager and su-
pervises the productions. Qualified
technicians handle the mechanics
of television transmission.
The studio itself takes about
one-third of the two-story build-
ing and through a glass panel in
the control room on the second
floor the program d i r e c t o r
watches and telephones instruc-
tion to cast members and cam-
era operators..

Does psychological and other
survey data aid business forecast-
ers?
This will be the question studied
by research experts and profession-
al forecasters at a seminar-confer-
ence held here by the Foundation
for Research on Human Behavior
Jan. 22 and 23.
* * *
THE CONFERENCE on "Using
Economic Expectations and Inten-
tions Data in Forecasting Business
Conditions" will appraise the pre-
dictive value of data from the sur-
Student Visits
To Determine
Traffic Route
Acting Dean of Students Walter
B. Rea is currently studying a re-
cently completed "traffic survey"
of visits to the Office of Student
Affairs by University students.
Conducted over a one-week pe-
riod, the survey was taken to find
out which offices in 1020 Adminis-
tration Bldg. were visited most.
Exact results of the survey have
not yet been revealed by the office.
IN RM. 1020 are the offices of
Dean Rea, Assistants to the Dean
of Students Karl D. Streiff and
William S. Zerman
Students are directed in the
office from the information desk
at the central doorway.
Possible outcome of the survey
may be to close off the hallway to
Dean Rea's office as well as other
intraoffice reorganization.

veys developed since World War
II and make recommendations for
improving such survey data.
The discussion of theory,
methodology and findings of
surveys of consumer purchase
intentions and expectations will
be lead by George Katona, pro-
gram director of the University
Survey Research Center.
Ralph J. Watkins, director of
research for Dun & Bradstreet,
Inc., and Dexter Keezer, vice-pres-
ident and director of the econom-
ics department of the McGraw-Hill
Publishing Co., will describe cur-
rent surveys of business expecta-
tions and investment plans.
* * *
ECONOMISTS and market re-
searchers from top business con-
cerns will report on their experi-
ence in utilizing survey data in
their own forecasting. There will
be representatives from most of
the large automobile manufactur-.
ers, electric equipment producers,
rubber tire companies, chemical
companies, oil companies, drug
manufacturers, food producers, re-
tail concerns and public utilities.
The group, limited to 35 per-
sons, will devote much of its
time to an exchange of experi-
ence, group appraisals and rec-
ommendations rather than set
speeches. A repeat seminar on
the same subject for a second
group will be held Feb. 5 and 6.
The foundation, a new and in-
dependant organization, which
tries to determine what research is
needed and its practical applica-
tions, uses seminars as an integral
part of its program of promoting
the partnership of research and
action agencies.

-CAMPUS-
211 S. State
NO -0675
-DOWNTOWN-
205 E. Liberty
NO 8-94013
for the Finest in Recorded Music
LOW" COST BANK
AUTO LOANS
New Cars-$4.00 per $100.00
Late Model Used Cars-
$5.00 per $100.00
* THE ANN ARBOR BAN~K
Main and Huron Streets
State Street at Nickels Arcade
1108 South University

ACTION, CAMERA-University students rehearse a program at the new studios before it's aired
over a local TV station. Students write, direct and act in the various productions prepared under
the supervision .of station manager, Prof. Garnet Garrison of the speech department. The new
equipment in the picture above is operated by students.

. An elaborate system of lights on
overhead booms and crossbars al-
lows almost complete flexibility in
lighting concentration and effects.
Programs may be recorded on film
for later presentation if a "live"
show is not feasible.

,

The MEDICAL BOOK
CENTER
MEDICAL, DENTAL,
AND PUBLIC HEALTH BOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
*-
Overbeck Bookstore
1216 South University

(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)
. . . Stand Up, Speak Out and Fight Back."*

Daily-Betsy Smith
ON llLM-The remodeled studio also has facilities for recording
programs when a live telecast is not possible. Two students above
prepare a drawing sequence to be recorded on film for a future
presentation.

Robert Thomson (left), B.S. in Ch.E., Univ.
P la n tof Va..'50, David S. Rumsey (center), M.S.
in Ch., Univ. of Mich. '48, and Rene M.
LeClair (right), M.S. in Ch. E., M.I.T. '51,
Uttest samples on an experimental batch unit.

_. __ ___

Devepment
Offers Training and Opportunity

A serious threat to the welfare of students and other
youth throughout Michigan is shaping up in the forthcoming
Un-American Committee "investigation" of education in this
state. The Committee-using the methods of McCarthyism-re-
presents a clear and present danger to the educational system
of our country. If the forthcoming hearings take place, they
will intensify this danger.
THE ATTEMPT TO CREATE A SILENT GENERATION
One of the principle objectives of McCarthyism is to lay
the groundwork for a generation of frightened, unthinking,
robot-like young people, who readily follow the "voice of
authority" without question: A SILENT GENERATION. Such
an objective, by Its very nature, threatens to destroy the right
to learn and study as independent, thinking people.
The expert opinion of numerous public figures fron all
walks of life can be cited to support the above charges. For
example:
In a survey of 72 major campuses by Kalman Seigel,
which won the George Polk Memorial Prize for accurate re-
porting, the "paralysis of freedom of thought and speech" is
described as follows:
"1. A reluctance to speak out on controversial issues in
and out of class.
"2. A reluctance to handle currently unpopular concepts
even in classroom work where they may be part of the study
program.
"3. An unwillingness to join student political clubs.
"4. Neglect of humanitarian causes because they may be
suspect in the minds of politically unsophisticated officials.
"5. An emphasis on lack of affiliation.
"6. An unusual amount of serio-comic joking about this
or that official investigating committee 'getting you.'
"7. A shying away, both physically and intellectually,
from any association with the words, 'liberal', 'peace', 'free-
dom', and from classmates of a liberal tinge.
"8. A sharp turning inward to local college problems; to
the exclusion of broader current questions."
THE ATTEMPT TO CREATE A BRUTALIZED, ROBOT-
LIKE GENERATION
Unthinking young people would be ready material for
Irresponsible military adventures at home and abroad. Dr. M.
M. Frohlick, top psychiatric aid of General Hershey, Director
of Selective Service, gives the following advice as to how to
make American young men "killers":
"There are three ways, preferably to be used in combi-
nation.. . . The most efficient method is to prompt them to
lose their individual identities by promoting a mob psychology.
People in a mob override their inhibitions and act as they
would never dare act as individuals. A second aproach is to
make the man feel that because he's in a uniform and because
he's an integral part of a group of men he likes and respects,
somehow it is all right to join them in setting aside one's
lifelong inhibitions against killing. The third tack is to provide
the man with a fatherlike leader, who, he can believe, is
supremely strong, wise and just; so that he will accept his
leader's orders to set aside temporarily the taboos against
killing."
THE IMPENDING HEARINGS OF THE UN-AMERICAN
COMMITTEE WILL GIVE AID AND COMFORT TO THOSE
WHO ENTERTAIN THE ABOVE OBJECTIVES-OF MAKING
OURS A SILENT GENERATION. IT IS JUST SUCH "INVES-
TIGATIONS" WHICH HAVE CREATED AND ARE CREAT-
ING THE FEAR AND REPRESSION REFERRED TO ABOVE,
Proof: The subpoenaing of teachers at the U. of M. and
Wayne would represent a warning to all others not to get out
of linĀ® inrpcnar: fn fni c o rlcn m .c . ici nii . x.

Proof: The subpoenaing of Bolza Baxter, Michigan State
State Chairman of the Labor Youth League, together with the
subpoenaing of the state membership list of the League, in
effect says:
-Inform on your membership, or go to jail for a year for
contempt of Congress; violate the confidence of friends
and neighbors, disregard the First Amendment which
guarantees freedom of assembly, turn your back on the
traditional privacy of political opinion as embodied in
the secret- ballot, reveal your membership and subject
them to persecution and harrassment-OR GO TO
JAIL!
Proof: The LYL happens to be only the first youth or.
panization to be so attacked by the Un-American Committee.
But there is a lesson in this attack for members of other youth
orgahizaions: the Committee in effect says:
-Keep .in line, or we will use the big stick on you too;
do not challenge the attempt to outlaw freedom of in-
quiry and freedom of association, refrain from being too
bold in defense of academic freedom, or-WE WILL USE
THE BIG STICK ON YOU TOO!
Proof: The Committee wants names. Will this. result in
constructive legislation? Of course not. It is a practice de-
signed to frighten people as its sole purpose.
Who will conduct the hearings in Michigan? What is
his record?
Rep. Kit Clardy's (R. Mich.) Congressional voting record
shows the following:
For: Ending rent controls.
For: Tidelands Oil Bill, giving valuable offshore oil re-
sources to states for private exploitation.
Against: Additional funds for veterans, medical services
and hospitals.
Against: Appropriating funds for 35,000 low-rent hous-
ing units a year.
Kit Clardy stated he would introduce a bill in Congress
to legalize the use of wiretapping evidence in court proceedings.
(Detroit Free Press, Jan. 5, 1954)
Kit Clardy was one of four. Congressmen who voted
against drought relief for stricken farmers in the west. (The
Searchlight, Dec. 23, 1953)
Kit Clardy was fired as Chairman of the Public Utilities
Commission in 1934 by Governor Comstock for "gross, wilful
and habitual neglect of duty," and "malfeasance and misfe-
asance in office." The Michigan Supreme Court upheld the
Governor's decision, stating "the Governor has not only the
power, but it was his duty to remove him (Clardy) . .:.
We charge that the real subversives are those who, by
their devotion to special private interests and by their inquisi-
torial investigating methods, betray their oath of office by dis-
regarding the First Amendment (freedom of assembly and
privacy of belief); the Fifth Amendment (curbing high-handed
committees from forcing a person to testify against himself);
and the Sixth Amendment (Due process).
LET US DEMAND from Clardy that he drop the inves-
tigations" and support a program in the interest of our
generation.
Should Clardy persist in holding his hearings despite
their unpopularity, let us go down in large delegations to the
hearings to observe; and there to petition Clardy to act on
some of the real needs of our generation:
A funds for scholarships
" funds for schools
9 more aid for veterans
" the 18 year old vote
0 repeal of the Smith, McCarran and McCarran-Wal-
ters Acts
* enactment of Fair Employment Practices legislation
O reduction of the draft
c onstructive peacetime action to provide full. em-
ployment

tion and operation of a pilot plant.
But this time, engineers from the
Production Division arranged for a
limited-scale plant test, using a spare
batch still and a crystallizer on a
part-time basis. Two months of test-
ing confirmed the previous data-the
new distillation-crystallization process
recovered adipic acid efficiently, and
would reduce costs considerably. The
plant is now using this process suc-
cessfully.
That's how one young chemical
engineer started his career in a typical
Du Pont Plant Development group.
The job of such groups is to make
processes and equipment more effi-
cient, to adapt products to new uses,
and to improve product quality.
Plant Development work not only
offers opportunity in itself but valu-
able training for other fields.
ASK FOR "Chemical Engineers at
DuPont." This new illustrated booklet
describes initial assignments, training,
and paths of promotion. Just send a
post card to E. I. du Pont de Nemours
& Co. (Inc.), 2521 Nemours Building,
Wilmington, Delaware. Also avail-
able: "Du Pont Company and the
College Graduate" and "Mechanical

John Purdom, M.S. in ChE., Ohio State '48 (right), confers with other engineers on the
progress of a new plant.

A young chemical engineer recently
had his first assignment in a Plant
Development group at Du Pont. He
was part of a team assigned to im-
prove recovery of adipic acid, a nylon
intermediate, from plant-waste
streams.

ahead with semi-works tests, while
an organic chemist completed the
laboratory work.
Next, the young chemical engineer
joined forces with a mechanical engi-
neer to design a semi-works plant to
evaluate each method. In this plant.

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