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January 15, 1954 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-01-15

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRTDAY, JANUARY 15,1954'

PAGE TWO THE MTCITTGANT DAIlY rRIDAY. JANIJAIIY 1! lfIS&

s,®.waaay va. ak.I.l {~lilwj'.1 lV) "VV't

, .

Ike's Farm,
Labor Plans
Viewed Here'
(Continued from Page 1)
have to be combined with other
programs to be generally accept-
ed."
The professor added that tke
President's message is a "revers-
al of previous programs and will
probably meet the opposition of
different agricultural p r e s s u r e
groups." , , ,
PROF. BOULDING also pointed
out that. one of the chief reasons
why farm stocks are accumulating
is that the agricultural field is over
manned. He further added that he
would like to see more positive ac-
tion' toward reducing the agricul-
tural population.
The message also intimated
that farm surpluses would be
channeled out of Federal hands
through disaster relief, school
lunch programs, or saved for
war or national emergencies.
The President's proposal to use
a flexible price support system has
already aroused dispute in Con-
gress.
Chief opponents of the sliding
system of price supports are not
only Democrats but also Republi-
cans from the South and Midwest,
the two great farming regions of
the nation.
Job Bureau
Offers Many
Opportunities
"The employment market is
now bright for college graduates,"
according to Robert B. Vokac, as-
sistant to the director of the Uni-
versity Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information.
Urging all seniors to register
with the Bureau before leaving
the University, Vokac pointed out
that a person whose name is on
file can be contacted even after
he has left Ann Arbor, if informa-
tion on a position he might be
able to fill comes in.
* * *
HOWEVER, for the Bureau to
be of greatest service to a student
he should register; "at least early
in his last semester," he said.
The Bureau of Appointments
which is open every week day
from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m.
to 4 p.m. is located in Rm. 3528
In the Administration Bldg. It
gets a personnel data sheet from
each applicant with information
on job preferences, courses
:taken, extra-curricular activi-
ties and other experience. Ref-
erences which the student ob-
tains from faculty members are
also keiqt on file.
Vokac stressed the importance
of registration for men who expect
to go into the army immediately
after graduation. "If these people
register now," he said "we can be
of use to them in finding a job
even before they get out of the
service." Many former students,
who. have not registered before
leaving come to the bureau after
discharge from the service only
to find that few people on campus
remember them, references are
difficult to get and the Bureau
has difficulty in finding them a
:job.
For June graduates the time to
register is now, Vocak emphasized,
since many companies send in re-
quests for job applicants, in both

teaching and business fields, in
the spring.

Union Expansion Plans
Reappraised Since 1946
(Continued from Page 1)

however, because of the Univer-
sity's building program on other
sections of the campus.
In March, 1952, Union offi-
cials revealed plans to build a
$2,750,000 addition to be called
the North Wing. The new wing
was to extend sixty feet into the
present circular driveway on the
side and was to rise four stories
Fraternities
A nnounce
Pledge. List
The Interfraternity Council yes-
terday announced the names of
26 men who pledged during open
rushing.
ACCACIA: William Zerbel,
Charles Wilson, James McCormick.{
ALPHA TAU OMEGA: John
Wardrop, Brent Sherman, David
Meyers.
DELTA CHI: Wiliam Pugh,
John Jenkins. .
DELTA SIGMA PHI: Richard
Hoek, Kenneth Seppelt, Joseph
Reed..
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: Con-
stantine Gianakaris, Alexander
Mayner.
KAPPA SIGMA: Harry Hawk-
ins.
PHI KAPPA SIGMA: David
Donley.
PHI KAPPA TAU: Rex Youse.
PHI GAMMA DELTA: Rommul-
us Portwood, Warren Wolfe.
PHI SIGMA KAPPA: James
Heier, Charles Dillman.
PSI UPSILON: Daniel O'Hara.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON:
Charles Krahnke, John Kuchka.
THETA CHI: Alan Miller.
TRIANGLE: Theodore Hummel.
TRIGON: Floyd Smith.

In front to match the other side
of the building.
The purpose behind the pro-
posed project was to provide addi-
tional service facilities, dining ac-
commodations, and room for stu-
dent activities. Specifically, a soda
bar, a student-faculty lounge on
the third floor, a new cafeteria,
and a record library were featured
in the proposed building program.
The details released in 1952 also
promised extensive remodeling of
the existing facilities. At that
time, Union officials pointed out
that a bond issue was necessary
to finance the project.
THE ISSUE cropped up again in
February of 1953 when the Board
began a reexamination of the
plans. Estimates then placed the
cost of the addition and remodel-
ing at three million dollars. The
plans were essentially the same as
those of the previous year, but
Donald May, chairman of the
planning committee at that time,
said that some changes would be
necessary.
One of the remodeling pro-
jects suggested then, building a
floor above the swimming pool
to provide more office space on
the. main floor, has been com-
pleted.
Original planning and cost esti-
mates also included demolition of
the old Journalism Bldg., now the
SL Bldg. to provide necessary space
for the expansion. The SL Bldg.
was condemned several years ago,
and several times since.
Details of the present plan will
not be released until the Regents
have been presented with the
plans at the meeting today.
Strickler also read a letter of
resignation from Board member
Prof. Harry Carver, who cited his
extensive work for the armed ser-
vices as the reason. The Board
passed a motion to ask President
Harlan H. Hatcher to appoint
someone to fill the vacancy.

Union Pool
To Reopen
The Union's basement swim-
ming pool will reopen Monday,
Frank C. Kuenzel, Union general
manager, announced yesterday.,
Members of the Union and their
guests may use the pool from 11
a.m. to 11 p.m. every day except
Tuesday and Thursday when it!
will be closed at 7 p.m. for use by
women students.
* * *
THE POOL has been closed
since last July while the balcony
over it was torn down and addi-
tional office room created on the
main floor.
The entire project, including
the remodeling of the main desk,
cost approximately $80,000, ac-
cording to Kuenzel.
In place of the balcony, the
pool now has a low ceiling, which
was the chief expense of the al-
terations. While construction was
in process, the opportunity was
taken to do some repair work on
the pool itself.
According to Kuenzel, cleaning
of the pool will be completed this
week-end. The springboard at the
east end of the 75-foot pool will
be lower than previously after it
is installed this week-end.
More Mercury
Than Needed
Anyone for the thermometer
business?,
Four years ago the Navy deliv-
ered 400 pounds of mercury to
the physics department and the
supply has since been collecting
dust according to Prof. James M.
Cork of the department.
Valued at more than a thousand
dollars, the mercury came from a
supply whch the Navy intended to1
use in an experimental ship run
on mercury vapor. Theoretically,
the ship should have been better:
than those run on steam. But it
wasn't, so the Navy, in the name
of science, distributed its excess
mercury among various universi-
ties under contract.
A tour of the physics depart-
ment revealed that science appar-
ently doesn't need the mercury
here as none of it has been used,
and no one knows what will be-
come of it.

MICHIGAN DAILY !
Phone NO 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND-Coat before Christmas. Write
A Schiro, 2735 S. Wagner. )88A
LOST-Sun glasses with pink frames in
brown leather case. Also room key.
Call 12 Chicago Hse., W. Quad. )90A
LOST-Maroon fountain pen between
Aud. A Angel Hall and Tappan Hall
at 10 a.m.,Wednesday. Call John Lep-
pelmneier, NO 3-4707. )89A
LOST-3 strand pearl bracelet, rhine-
stone clasp. Call NO 2=9770. )91A
LOST-Pickett slide rule in plastic case
on January 12. Call NO 3-0521. Ext.
612. )92A
FOR SALE
1940 FORD two door. Heater, radio,
good tires. Very good body. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington. Ph.
NO 2-4588 or NO 2-3163. )269B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
,RADIO-PHONOGRAPH table combina-
tion, 3-speed changer, $60. NO 3-2554.
BABY PARAKEETS-Various colors, $8
each. New and used cages and bird
supplies. Mrs. Ruffins, 582 S. 7th.
) 196B
1941 CHEVROLET-2 door, black, one
owner, faculty personnel car. Heater,
new tires, clean. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington. Phone NO 2-4588
or NO 2-3163. )268B
GUARANTEED
BATTERIES

FOR SALE
DOUBLE COIL SPRINGS, $8.00; Steel
Folding Cot, straight springs without
mattress, $4.00. Upholstered adjust-
able reclining chair with footstool,
$10.00. Two large sideboards, $8 each.
Large walnutaveneeretableand five
chairs, $15.00. Coal hot water heater,
$5.00. 26-inch boy's bicycle in good
condition, $15. Phone NO 2-9020.
)258B
NIKON-35mm width Nikon, F:2 coated
lens, flash synchronization. Leather
carrying case and complete Nikon
Model "S" flash gun. Like new. $170.
Call NO 2-4636. )261B
1952 NASH RAMBLER Station Wagon.
Heater, radio, overdrive. Snow-gripI
tires; low mileage. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington. Phone NO 2-4588
or NO 2-3163. )266B
BY OWNER: $2500 down will handle
easily maintained economical new
three bedroom home. Pleasant com-
munity area with playground. Has,
basement recreation room, large kit-
chen, automatic gas heat, tile bath,
on bus line, one block from Stone
School. 2990 Shady Lane or Ph. NO
5-3052. )262B
WHIZZER MOTOR BIKE-Owner must
sacrifice. For immediate sale. -Phone
Ypsilanti 4606. )263B
1948 KAISER-Black, 4 door, very clean.
Heater, good tires. Complete price,
$200. Ask for Smitty. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington. Phone NO
2-4588 or NO 2-3163. )265B
TAPE RECORDER-4 reels tape, Phone
pickup, patch cord-$85 takes lot.
Ph. NO 3-8908. )260B
TUXEDO-40 long. Call Bill, NO 2-7119.
)264B

ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOM with private bath, first floor, one
block from campus. Call NO 3-42091
between 9 anO 5. )33D
WANTED TO SHARE furnished behe-
lor quarters in Pittsfield Village
apartment. Responsible graduate stu-
dent-Must be reader of New Yorker
and be unobtrusive. $55 a month.
Call NO 3-3152 between 6 p m. and
7 p.m. )26D
DOUBLE SUITE for two men, workers
or students, separate closets and
chests. LARGE SINGLE ROOM. close
to Campus and Union. Reasonable.
509 S. Division. )34D
TRIPLE, DOUBLE. SINGLE ROOMS-.
Phone NO 2-1465, 923 Olivia Ave. )35D
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM AND BOARD or Board only for
advanced men students. Rebates on
meals. 1319 Hill. NO 2-6422. )11E
PERSONAL
STUDENTS graduating in Feb. are not
eligible for special student rates
AFTER they leave school. Order now.
Student Periodical, NO 5-1843 (9 a.m.-
10 p.m.). )53F
TRANSPORTATION
TWO RIDERS to Northern California,
Oregon, or Washington to help drive
and share expenses. Leaving after
Jan. 23. Phone Dick Dahlberg-day-
time, ext. 2163; night, NO 2-4591. )41G
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED-Young lady for partt
time work at soda fountain. Swift's
Drug Store, 340 S. State. Phone NO
2-0534. )57H
---I
SHOE SALESMAN-Experience prefer-
red. Afternoons and Saturdays. Male
or female. Hours can be arranged to,
fit your schedule. Ask for Mr. Car-
men, Randalls, 306 S. State. )59H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales, and service.
MORRILLS
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service

BUSINESS SERVICES,
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Buff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Ph. NO 2-9020. )21
YOUNG MAN, M.A. 1 yr. PhD, English,
U. of M. Now working in engineering
research. Would like to work at home
editing, arts, science, literature, ad-
verti sing. ghost - writing, secretarial
services. NO 2-8257. )23I
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Phone NO 8-7590. 830
So. Main. )3I
APPLICATION PHOTOGRAPHS while
you wait at SNIDER STUDIOS, 213 So.
Main St. }161
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments.
Ph. NO 2-2678. Catherine St., near
State. Alta Groves. )1H%
REAL ESTATE
FACULTY FAMILIES wanted to build
homes in natural area near North
Campus. Use of private picnic area
wit hpond and stream. Box 5, )30

I'

FOR RENT

I Campus Calendar

$5

AND OLD
BATTERY

UNFURNISHED 4-room flat for rent.
Heat and water furnished, 8985 Island
Lake Rd., 1 mile west of Dexter.
HA 6-9411. ) 23C
BASEMENT APARTMENT - Complete
- for married couple, in' return for
housekeeping assistance. Telephone
NO 2-4055. )24D
COED needs room-mate to share mod-
ern 3-room apartment; piano. Phone
NO 3-1204. )25D
ROOMS FOR RENT
LARGE DOUBLE ROOMS NEAR UNION
Cooking privileges. Men students. Now
or Feb. 1st. Ph. NO 3-8454. )26D
ROOM for rent for male student. 1516
Dexter. Cali after 5:00. NO 2-6705.
)27D
LARGE, CLEAN single room for male
student close to Yost Field House.
NO 2-0796. )31D
ROOMS for male students. 2 doubles,
one with private bath. One block
from Law School, 808 Oakland. )32D

1

READ
AND
USE
DAILY
CLASS I FIEDS

T

f1

SL MOVIE-"Johnny Belinda,"
starring Jane Wyman in her
Academy Award winning role will
be shown at 7 and 9 p.m. tonight
at the Architecture Auditorium.
"The Hasty Heart" with Richard
Todd, will play at 7 and 9 p.m.
tomorrow and 8 p.m. Sunday.
- .
SPEECH DEPARTMENT PLAY
-" Tartuffe," by Moliere, a play
telling of the frivolous period of
Louis XIV, will be presented at
8 p.m. tonight at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater.
Reserved seats may be purchas-
ed at the Lydia Mendelssohn box
office from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m.
at the student rate of 50 cents
and the regular rate of $1.20, 90
cents and 60 cents.
POLGAR SHOW-The "Mir-
acles of the Mind" show will be
presented tonight at 8:30 p.m. in
Hill Auditorium.
Tickets are on sale from 1 p.m.
to 5 p.m. today.

ARTS THEATER CLUB-Ibsen's
"Rosmersholm," a drama of an
idealist caught in the web of a
corrupt world will be given at 8:30
p.m. tonight, and will run through
Jan. 30.
* .- -
BLUEBOOK BALL - Students
may dance to the music of Paul
McDonough and his orchestra in
the Union Ballroom from ,9 p.m.
'till midnight tomorrow before fac-
ing the ordeal of final exam week.
* * *
ORGAN RECITAL - David'
Craighead, guest organist from
Occidental College, Pasadena,
Calif. will present a program at
4:15 p.m. Sunday in Hill Audi-
torium.
The recital will be open to the
general public without charge.
* * *
EXAM WEEK MOVIE-'Pass-
port to Pimlico" a comedy starring
Margaret Rutherford and Stanley
Holloway, will be featured in the
Union Ballroom at 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, admission free.

BATTERY STORES ASSOCIATED
Liberty and Ashley )242B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Special tripod with pan head. Regular
$13.75, now $9.75. Purchase Camera
Shop, 1116 S. Uniyersity. )259B
1949 PONTIAC-4 door, green. Heater,
new rubber. Sharpest '49 Pontiac in
the state. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. Phone NO 2-4588 or
NO 2-3163. )267B

ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1214 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
1, blocks east of East Eng.
314 State St., Phone NO 8-7177

)51

Famous for
Steaks

k

TODAY
t yru
Sunday

ORPHEUM

Fri. 7:00
Sat., Sun 1:30
60c

E

,
-

_k'

" ' ",
( .,

The New CAR USO Hit!
FEATURING THE VOICE OF THE METROPOLITAN SENSATION
MARIO DEL MONACO!

BOOKI
Jan. 15, 16
"Charge At
Feather River"
Jan. 17-20
"3 Sailors
And A Girl"
Jane Powell
Gordon MacRae
Jan. 21-23
"Dangerous
Crossing"
Jeanne Craine

NGS
Jan. 15-16
.CI.NEMASCOPE
"Beneath The
12 Mile Reef"
,Jan.17-21
"Jack SIOde"
.,carting Jan. 22
"King Of The
Khyber, Rifles"'

;,

4

6

CHOPS - FRESH PERCH
COLD BEER - WINE
TV --SHUFFLEBOARD
Ziegler's
120 West Liberty
OPEN 4 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

I

The Un'ol
intimate
story of
his early
nears . .

COMING ATTRACTIONS

I

"The Young ARUSO"
GINA LOLLOBRIGIDA
(Life Cover Girl)
EMMANO RANDI
VOICE OF MARIO DEL MONACO

IN ANN ARBOR
. . . it's the V.F.W. Club for
DANCING
Tuesday, Friday and Saturday Nites

I

Jan. 22-25-"SEA AROUND US"

I

Jan. 29-31-"LITTLE WORLD OF DON CAMILLO"
Feb. 5-7-"PARIS EXPRESS"

CinemaSLqprsd
presents

i

S

191

55c - 18c
TODAY thru Sunday
THE STORY OF OUR
BOISTEROUS
ROISTEROUS .
PRISONERS OF WAR!

I

JOHNNY BELINDA
with LEW AYRES, JANE WYMAN
Thursday and Friday, 7:00 and 9:00

III.

HASTY HEART
with RONALD REAGAN, PATRICIA NEAL,
RICHARD TODD
Saturday 7:00 and 9:00 - Sunday 8:00 only

1

1.

1

THE LAUGH-LOADED
SALUTE TO THE P.W.'s!
starring
WILLIAM HOLDEN
DON TAYLOR
OTTO PREMINGER
Also
RECK ES LOVE
..,* ae

~I

I

FINE MOVIES COMiNG
TO THE CINEMA GUILD
Jan. 21, 22-"Strangers on a Train"
Jan. 23, 24-"Lost Horizon
Jan. 29, 30-"Viva Zapata"

I-

!1

I

I

Feb. 4, 5, 6, 7-"Man in the White Suit"

I

I

i

I I lIE -&VA..IN'FE.ZmU' d Ot.U

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