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September 16, 1953 - Image 11

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-16

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER I6, 1953 '

STHE MICHIGAN ATTY

PAGE TAKER

PAGE TR1I~EU

COUNSELING SERVICE:
Students Given Guidance
By Faculty Supervisors

'U' CHOIRS:
Singing Groups Provide
Plentiful Opportunities

(Continued from Page 1)
The -academic counselor's staff
is made up of sixteen faculty mem-
bers from various University de-
partments and is presided over byj
Prof. Arthur H. Van Duren of the
German department.
THE PURPOSE of the academic
counselor, according to Prof. Van
Duren, Is to supervise the academic
program during the first two years.
Students are aided in the selec-
tion of courses so that distribution
requirements are filled, and infor-
mation is provided for the students
to decide upon a major concentra-
tion program.
Many students have too defi-
nite professional objectives, and
we have found that over 60% of
the students change their minds
about their course of study after
matriculation. That is why we
encourage breadth in the funda-
mental curriculum during the
first two years and leave the
depth of detailed professional
study for the junior and senior
years, Prof. Van Duren contin-
ned.
The change from high school to
college life greatly accentuates de-
velopment and responsibility, Prof.
Van Duren stated.
It is. the task of the University
counseling system to, help bring'
students to realize that they are in
a new and different world and
that demands are made upon them
as adults, not as teen-agers. They
must learn to make decisions and
abide by their consequences, or in
other words, they have to assume
responsibility for their actions.
IN HELPING to bring about this
adjustment, the academic coun-
selors make use of all of the Uni-
versity agencies which offer spec-
ial student services, Prof. Van Dur-
en explained. This is the'oft-called
referral system which brings into
play the facilities of the Health
Service and its mental hygiene
unit, the Bureau of Psychological
Services and its vocational infor-
mation unit along with personal
testing and guidance services, the
offices of the Dean of Women and
the Dean of Men, and also the
residence hall counselors. All of
these units in turn report back
to the academic counselor.
At the end of the second year,
a concentration program is elect-
ed and the students' records are
transferred across the hall to the
office of concentration advisors
in Rm. 1213 Angell Hall. Here,
the student meets with a faculty
member from the department
which the student has chosen to
concentrate. The counselor ad-
vises the student in much the
same manner as the academic
counselors as to course selection
and meeting graduation or pre-
professional requirements. How-
ever, the choice of courses and
* the responsibility of seeing that

elections are properly made rests
with the individual student.
After the first five weeks of
school, progress grades are sent
to the counselors' office for all
freshmen. The counselors mail
these grades with an invitation to
come in for an interview to all first,
year students. This procedure is
followed both the first and second
semesters.
*t * ,
WHEN MIDSEMESTER time
rolls around, the counselors re-
ceive reports of unsatisfactory (D
or E) progress from all students.
These eight-week grades in addi-
tion to being sent to the involved
students are sent home to inform
parents of poor progress.
In the engineering school
the counseling system operates
somewhat differently because of
a planned program, according
to Dean Walter J. Emmons.
Incoming engineering students
still have the samepre-enrollment
opportunities, but after matricula-
tion they are assigned to a "Meru-
tor group" which consists of about
a dozen students under a faculty
man, Dean Emmons pointed out.
Students can consult with their
mentor on any academic or ad-,
justment problems and if neces-
sary they will be referred to the
proper places for help. /
* * *
HELPING the mentor in his
work are the freshman assemblies
that the engineering school holds
to explain the rules of scholarship
and point out the various fields of
engineering open to students, Dean
Emmons said.
Dean Emmons was also of the
opinion that too many students.
try the professions without ever
having experienced any of the
work involved because of their
glamour and prestige.
in offering suggestions to fresh-
men, Dean Emmons stated that
counseling like all education is a
two way street-if the student
puts forth the effort, the coun-
selors will provide the necessary
guiding signs, and traffic will run
smoothly.
Students also participate in the
work of counseling along academic
lines.
* * ft
A PROGRAM of student advis-
ors, composed of concentrates in
the various fields of the literary
college, the business administra-
tion school, and the education
school, is sponsored by the Stu-
dent. Legislature and the literary
college. Their activities, however,
are limited to the early part of
orientation week and the latter
parts of the semester when the
counselor's load becomes quite
heavy.
Another aspect of counseling
is found in' the dormitory sys-
tem, where a more personal and
See 'U, Page 8

Under the direction of Prof.
Maynard Klein, conductor of the
University Choirs and Director of
Choirs at the National Music
Camp, Interlochen, Michigan,
choral singing at Michigan
abounds in rich and plentiful op-
portunities.
In total there are six singing
groups under Prof. Klein's direc-
tion, and over 400 participating
voices. The largest ensemble is of
course the 250 mixed voices who
comprise the University Choir.
* * *
THIS CHOIR usually rehearses
from 7:00-8:30 p.m. Wediesdays.
It covers a wide range of litera-
ture consisting from works of the
sixteenth century to the present.
In the past they have given per-
formances of Bach's St. Matthew
Passion, Mozart's Requiem, and
Stravinsky's Symponie de Psau-.
meis.
The most advanced and select
Choir is the Michigan Singers,
a group of 50 voices chosen very
carefully from the best voices
on campus. When possible this
group goes on tour. Their rep-
ertory consists mainly of motets,
madrigals, contemporary works,
and those pieces that demand
the technical perfection of a

small ensemble.
The Tudor Singers is a Choir of
16 voices who sing music of all pe-
riods. They are the usual perform-
ing group for the Collegium Mu-
sicum, an organization noted for
their research, and performance of
old music, particularly Renais-
sance, which has just been re-
discovered, and re-edited.
The Bach Choir has 80 mixed
oices andsalso sings muslo from
all periods. There is a Women's
Choir of 30 voices which per-
forms such works as Debussy's
Blessed Damozel and Pergolesi's
Stabat Mater. In addition to the
.Women's Choir, there is the
Women's Glee Club which con-
sists of 40 voices. The Women's
Glee Club each year goes on
tour.
THE ARTS CHORALE is a mix-
ed group affording any student the
opportunity of singing a varied
repertory of good choral music and.
the experience of concert perform-
ances. They rehearse from 7:00-
8:30 p.m. Thursdays, and give a
few concerts during the year. For
those inexperienced in choral sing-
ing, or who might not qualify for
the other Choirs, Arts Chorale
provides a splendid outlet.

'U's NATIONALLY FAMOUS MARCHING BAND SPELLS OUT M-I-C-H AT THE STADIUM BETWEEN HALVES OF FOOTBALL GAME.
UrB*r* * Fa * * * * *
University Bands Famous from Coast to Coast

d.

Y

In 1844 nine-student musicians
assembled to play at campus
chapel services.
These nine men were the orig-
inal nucleus of the University
Bands,, an organization today
comprising over 250 students.
Under the direction of Prof.
William D. Revelli, the Band con-
sists of three units, Marching
Band, Symphony Band, and Wol-
verine Band. With the exception
of the Marching Band, which is
open only to men, both men and
women from all colleges in the
University may apply for mem-
bership.
* * *
HOWEVER membership in the
Bands is determined by audition
with Prof. Revelli and his assist-
ants. Auditions for the Wolver-
ine and Symphony Band are held
during registration week. Audi-
tions for the Marching Band are
held on Sunday afternoon preced-
ing registration week.
The Marching Band is most
active during the fall football
season and it plays for games
and pep rallies. The Marching
Band also accompanies the
football team on at least two
out-of-town trips. This year

trips are scheduled to Minnesota
and Michigan State.
Most famous of the Bands, the
Marching Band has been the sub-
ject of a special short feature,
"Here Comes the Band," produced
by RKO pictures, and has also
had a feature article in "Life"
magazine. Uniforms, consisting
of the main performance outfit,
can be obtained from the Univer-
sity during rehearsals.
THE UNIVERSITY Symphony
Band has a membership of ap-
proximately 110 pieces. Possessing
one of the largest band libraries
in the nation, it gives numerous
concerts during the year and each
spring goes on tour to all parts
of the nation. In the past such
distinguished guest conductors as
Percy Grainger, Morton Gould,
Edwin Franko Goldman, and Ferde
Grofe have conducted the Sym-
phony Band.
At the end of the fall semes-
ter this year the Symphony
Band will record their first al-
bum for RCA Victor. This marks
the first time the Band will have
appeared on nationally-distrib-
uted recordings.
The Wolverine Band centers its
program around different extra-

curricular activities. 'It plays for
basketball games, an occasional
hockey game, local parades, and
different other activities. This
Band is recommended for those
without enough proficiency to
qualify for the Symphony or
Marching Band, and for those
who do not have the time to de-
vote to the extensive rehearsals
required by those other bands.
* * *t
FOR ALL BANDS instiuments
will be provided free of charge by
the University. Concerts in Ann
Arbor are given in Hill Auditor-
ium. However during the spring
there are out-of-doors concerts
given "on the mall." These con-
certs are performed on the steps
Try FOLLETT S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

of the Rackham Graduate School,
which provides a panoramic view
of the campus from the fountain
to the Main Library.

_ _ _- _ _ _ _ _

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