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September 16, 1953 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-16

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I

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN. DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1953

#R

PERSONAL GUIDANCE:
Counseling Service Aids
Students with Problens

C*>--

The counseling system at the
University is set up so that each
student receives the personal guid-
ance that is often lacking in a
large school.
This is the keystone of the Uni-
versity counseling system, accord-
ing to Clyde Vroman; Director of
Admissions.
The pre-enrollment counseling
during a summer visit to campus
is the first contact the student is
likely to have with the University
counseling system. This program
which centers around the admis-
sions office, offers the prospective
student an opportunity to discuss
Yom Kippur
Service Slated
The B'nai-Brith Hi~lel Founda-
tion has scheduled Yom Kippur
iervices to be held Frjd y and Sat-
urday in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater.
All stats for the services are re-
served. No charge has been set for
the -rt.fervations which may be
picked i p anytime a b the Mendels.
sohn- pox office.
The first service has been sche-
duled- foi 6:15 p~m. Friday. Sat-
urday's will begin at 9:30 a.m.
READ AND USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

with an advisor his educational ob-
jectives and any problems or in-
securities which he might have. In-
formation about living arrange-
ments, part-time employment,
campus activities, and University
services also may be obtained at
this time. Letters are sent along
with the admission certificates
urging incoming students to take
advantage of this service.
* * *
THE NEXT step usually takes
the student to the academic coun-
selors office in Rm. 1210 Angell
Hall where he talks over his pro-
gram and selects the courses he
will take in his initial semester
at the University. After matricual-
ation this office will provide the
basic contact point with the coun-
seling system for freshmen and
sophomores.
During'the Orientation Period
preceeding registration the stu-
dent will meet the academic
counselor to which he has been
assigned. He retains the same
counselor during his first two
years at the University. This
would be the first meeting with
the University counseling sys-
tem for those who had been un-
able to take part in the pre-en-
rollment counseling program.
Here the advisor explains the
services offered by the academic
counselor and helps with the
making out of programs for
those who have not previously
done so.
See STUDENTS, Page 3

Deferment
Possibilities
At'U' Listed
Three ways are open for the
physically fit freshman man to
face his armed service obligation
and also go to college:
1. He can seek deferment from
his draft board.
2. He can join the Organized
Reserve Corps or the National
Guard.
3. He can join one of the three
branches of the ROTC on cam-
pus. !
IF A STUDENT takes the first
path and tries to get a deferment,
he must pass the academic apti-
tude test. This test is given on a
national scale twice a year. The
next deferment test will be given in
December. The exact date has not
been announced.
Passing this test does not
guarantee deferment, however.
The test results are used by the
local draft boards along with the
student's marks as guides to de-
termine whether or not defer-
ment will be granted.
Another factor which can be
considered by the local boards is
the program under which the stu-
dent is enrolled. Deferments can
legally be given only to students
studying in a field the board feels is
"necessary to the maintenance of
the national health, safety, or in-
terest." This, however, has been in-
terpreted as meaning most any
college program.
See ROTC, Page 8

University's First Family

Future grading of literary col-
lege instructors by students will
depend upon a faculty committee
report to be presented this fall.
Begun in 1948, on a trial basis,
the evaluations of the faculty
proved popular with the students.
The faculty "report card" took
the form of a questionnaire where
the students rated on a numerical
(1-5, tops to poor) basis several
aspects of the effectiveness of
teacher and text. Average com-
piled after each evaluation showed
an overall 2-plus rating.
* * *
NO ADMINISTRATIVE deci-
sions were based upon these eval-
uations, the last of which took
place in the fall of 1951.
Since that time, a faculty
committee has been appointed
to make a study of the evalua-
tions and report on their mer-
its. This report is nearing the
completion stage, and is sched-
uled to be presented to the

faculty senate at the September
or October meeting. The recom-
mendations, if any, made by
this committee may sway the
faculty to continue or dscn-
tinue the evaluations.
There seems to be a widely
varying opinion on the part of
the faculty as to whether student
judgments were dependable or not,
according to Prof. Shorey Peterson
of the economics department,
chairman of the committee.
PROF. PETERSON. also .said
that the committee plans to cor-
relate the results of the* Univer-
sity evaluations with the exper-
iences of 40 comparable schools.
At last spring's student-faculty
literary college conference, stu-
dents voiced the opinion that they
liked very much to participate in
these evaluations, but- they felt
that they were not in a position
to make decisions of academic
nature.

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CONTROVERSIAL:
Grading of Professors
Up toFaculty Committee

A

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Tda4eI

PRESIDENT HARLAN H. HATCHER POSES FOR A FAMILY PORTRAIT WITH HIS WIFE AND
CHILDREN, ANNE LINDA, AND BOBBY.
* 4 * * * * * * * *
Hatcher To Begin Third Year at 'U'
4---

ANYWHYERE IN THE W ORLD

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Harlan Henthorne Hatcher will
begin his junior year on campus
as University President this fall.
Eighth president, the 54-year-
old educator, author and civic
leader was appointed-to succeed re-
tiring President Alexander Ruth-
ven in May, 1951. He has spent
his first two years getting to know

people and places, and trying to
become "a students' president."
* * *
PRESIDENT Hatcher has a wide
background for his job of heading
one of the Midwest's top universi-
ties. A native of Ironton, 0., he
prepared for college at Morehead
Normal School in Kentucky.

,i
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;
1
c
f

Varied Campus Clubs Please
Number of Student Interests

After completing preliminary
work at Ohio State University,
he received his Ph.D degree from
Ann Arborites' arch rival school
in 1927.
He did postgraduate work in the
United States and abroad, and be-
came professor in 1932, he served
as dean from 1944 to 1948 and be-
came vice-president in charge of
faculties and curriculum in Sep-
tember, 1948.
NOTED as one of Ohio's most
outstanding citizens, President
Hlatcher was given the Ohio Gov-
ernor's Award for advancement of
Ohio's prestige in 1949. A year lat-
er he received the Ohioana Grand
Medal for his books on Ohio and
the Northwest Territory.
Aiding President Hatcher in run-
ing the University, a $40,000,000
a year business are Vice President
and Dean of Faculties Marvin L.
Niehuss; Vice-President Wilbur K.
Pierpont, in charge of business and
inance; Secretary and Assistant
Vice-President Herbert G. Wat-
kins; and Director of University
Relations Artlur L. Brandon.

ALL DOMESTIC
AND INTERNATIONAL
TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS
THINK OF YOUR 1954
Atuet our toE CN OWe
AND LIST YOUR NAME NOW!

I

YOUR TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS

More than 2,900' freshmen to
the University will find 125 stu-
dent organizations designed, for
every taste, ranging from political
clubs to nationality groups.
SPECIAL permission for part-
time and special students and
those on probation may be grant-
ed by the Dean of Students Erich
ISA Program
Aids Students
An explanation of the national
sport of football, campus tradi-
tions and.registration are all part
of the International Students As-
sociation orientation program for
[new foreign students." "
Provisions have been made to
meet newly arriving students at
train depots and give them trans-
portation to the International
Center or their housing units. ISA
is aiding students by enabling
them to get detailed information
about registration and campus
traditions from students of their
own countries or fields of study.
A picnic Saturday for all for-
eign students and their families'
and a mixer Sept. 25 are among
thy social events planned.

Walter and Dean of Women Deb- {
orah Bacon.
Students are directly respon-
sible for observance of the
eligibility rules but in case of
doubt, they may inquire at thez
Office of Student Affairs.a h
Campus politicos keep their ma-
chines well-oiled even in off-elec-
tion years. Young Republicans and1
Young Democrats work in bring-,
ing national, state and local polit-
ical figures to campus.
STUDENTS for Democratic Ac-
tion, League of Women Voters,
Civil Liberties Committee, Inter-
national Relations Club, National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People, World Student
Service Associations and a cam-
pus UNESCO group are also in the
limelight..
Appreciation of the arts is
furthered through membership
in the Arts Chorale, Inter-Arts
Union, Gothic Film Society and
the Student Players. The Gibert
and Sullivan Society and the
Men's and Women's Glee Clubs
present musical productions
throughout the year.
Other fields of study that are
represented by active campus
groups are architecture, public ad-
ministration, business administra-
See '125', Page 8

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TRAVEL SERVICE
12-14 Nickels Arcade -- Ann Arbor
DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT , .. 2-3156
INTERNATIONAL DEPARTMENT,. .. 3-8597

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#4

THE QUARRY, Inc.
HEADQUARTERS FOR YOUR CAMERA NEEDS
Wlelcomnes You to Michigan,

-1

KODAK

....::.......:.......::........ .... :. a

ON CAMPUS
GOOD HOTEL
ACCOMMODATIONS
FIREPROOF
EVERY ROOM
AIR CONDITIONED
- ,r -r, r r mlr-r-1T-1 T

11

ARGUS... ANSCO
POLAROID... REVERE. .-BOLEX

ROLLEI

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EXACTA .

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WE ALSO RENT PROJECTORS
AND CAMERAS

. r'WY"7 oir "r 1 n

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