100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE 970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMEER 4, 1953

F

I

State Heads
In Education
Meet Today
Seven hundred parents and edu-
cational leaders from throughout
the state will gather in the Rack-
ham Building today and tomor-
row for the 24th annual meeting
of the Parent Education Institute.
"The Conservation of Human
Resources" is the theme of the
program which is open to the pub-
lic.
PROF. WILLIAM C. Morse, as-
sociate professor of educational
psychology will give a principal
address. He will discuss "The
Mental Health of Our Children"
at the opening 'assembly at 10:30
am. today.
Discussion groups and lectures
will include the topics of mi-
grant workers' children, the
physically exceptional child, the
mentally exceptional child,
character and spiritual educa-
tion, and home and family liv-
ing.
The institute is a joint project
of the University Extension Ser-
vice and the Michigan Congress
or Parents and Teachers.
Registration for the institute
opens at 8:30 a.m. today in the
lobby of the Rackham Building.
Poll Result:
No Exams
For Seniors
(Continued from Page 1)
weeks vacation classes would re-
sume with the end of the second
semester coming around the first
of May.
* * *
THIS REVISION was termed an
advancement by some because "it
would give seniors a jump on the
job."
Opponents of this proposal
commented many summer jobs
last until Labor Day; Christmas
vacation is often used for term
paper writing and general catch-
ing up and climatitic conditions
in September and October are
not conusive to study. Of
course, they added, neither are
conditions in June.
Concerning the proposal that
instructors turn in grades before
the final and give early finals for
thosestudent in danger of failing,
the objection of the difficulty fac-
ed in grading in a large lecture
session was brought forth.
Dee Keith, '54, favors this plan
because "those who have good
gradles know the course and there
is no reason for a final."
Another proposal that finals be
held two weeks before the end of
3shool and be followed by a com-
frehensive review of the course
4rought.comment from Bea John-
Jon, saying this would be fine "if
students were really students."
The quarter system was opposed
by the majority, contacted.
Some students had no feeling
about the matter as long as "we
are given time to study."
Said one student, "When are
the students going to grow up and
let the Administration run the
school ?"

Badeau To Talk
On Middle East
President John S. Badeau of
the Near East Foundation will lec-
ture on "New Movements in the
Middle East: Their Significance
and Challenge" at 4:15 p.m. to-
morrow in the Rackham Amphi-
theater.
Former president of the Amer-
ican University at Cairo, Egypt,
Badeau has had many years of
Near Eastern experience. During
World War II he served as chief
regional specialist for the Middle
East with the United States Office
of War Information.
Pre-Law Society
To Hear Edwards
Hon. George Edwards, judge of
probates, juvenile division, in
Wayne County will speak on "The
Law-An Adventure in Facts arid
Ideas" at the meeting of Michi-
gan Crib, pre-law society, at. 8
p.m. tomorrow in the League.
ION"

PROOF NEEDED:
Search for Lung Cancer
Causes Awaits Evidence

aw roup
To Convene m B a

4

Catches

Color

By JANE HOWARD
Reports from the American Can-
cer Society's current meeting in
New York suggesting possible
causes for lung cancer have been
received with guarded local en-
thusiasm.
One statement made at the
meeting attributed the increase of
lung cancer to traffic jams, where
exhaust fumes from motors form
a "hazy blue plague" inducive to
the disease. Tests have been made
by injecting the engine exhausts
into the skin of mice, with a re-
sult to date of cancer in half the
animals.
DOCTORS and scientists at the
symposium turned their attention
to the widely popular conception
that lung cancer may result from
excessive smoking. Cigarettes are
regarded withsuspicion chiefly
because smokers are much more
prone to lung cancer than non-
smokers. Other reports, however,
appear to lessen the effect of
smoking habits in the search for
the disease's cause.
Again experimenting with
mice, scientists have exposed an-
imals to heavy cigarette smoke
40 hours a week, with no lung
cancer increase. Other tests,
treating embryonic mouse tis-
sues with extracts from tobac-
co and cigarette paper had fail-
ed, at the report's release, to
produce any cancer evidence.
"This is all interesting," com-
mented Dr. John Alexander, pro-
fessor of surgery, "but ideas like
these are just fads and guesses,
based on incomplete evidence."
Dr. Fred J. Hodges, a radiology
specialist, added to medical hesi-
tancy to accept any unverified
proof.
"LUNG CANCER is terribly im-
portant," Dr. Hodges said, "and
it's especially common in men,
though we don't know why. The
average age is around 50, but many
times victims have the disease for

six or more years without know-
ing it."
"But you're way out in left
field," the doctor said, "when
you question the reasons for
lung cancer. The smoking cru-
sade is always a strong one, but
again there are no conclusive
proofs. Don't be convinced of
news like this," he cautioned,
"until the facts are established."
Dr. Carl Vernon Weller of the
pathology department added the
comment, "There's a big distinc-
tion between the verbs 'might' and
'could' in relation to cancer'" A
number of factors are known to
cause the disease, he said, but
opinions on tar, smoking, and
motor exhaust fumes are all just
guesses. "These are promising
fields of investigation," he said,
"but as yet nothing has been prov-
ed in respect to them."

Here Toda
Recognizing the importance of
public relations to the legal pro-
fession, 100 lawyers from all over
the country will gather at the
University today for the first Mid-
west Institute on Public Relations
for the Bar.
THE FIRST conference of its
kind in the nation, the meeting
marks an increasing awareness of
professions that good public rela-
tions are a definite need. The pro-
gram will be tailored to fit needs
of the individual lawyer.
By bringing Bar officials to
the meeting, Institute heads
hope to impart to them essen-
tials of good public relations to
take back to their group and
thus increase good will toward
the profession. "When the pro-
sion is generally well thought
of," State Bar Association Secre-
tary Milton E. Bachmann point-
ed out, "people are not so likely
to, condemn the whole group
when a few bad individuals show
up."
Presented through the joint ef-

At

Homecoming Game

I r, . .

7 N

Engineering Honor,
Society Will Meet
Thirty-third annual convention

1111 y 'lll aulua gul c dllforts othe La School h ih
of Pi Tau Sigma, mechanical en- fort of the uta S nd the Ch-
gineering honor society, will be igan Law Institute and the Corn-
held at the University tomorrow mittee onPublic Relations of the
through Saturday. State Bar, the conference is a
The 130 delegates, coming from step in the general public rela-
more than 50 colleges and univer- tions program of the State Bar.
sities, will make a tour of the cam- -
pus and visit a Detroit motor com- SL Agenda
pang'.

a

ALUMS ARRIVE: "REMEMBER WHEN?" READY, UP, FLIP, DOWN

'U' Contracts City
For Policemen
The University has contracted,
with the city of Ann Arbor to pro-
vide nine new policemen to work
in the campus area although they
will remain under control of the
city police department it wasI
learned yesterday.
Two of the vacancies have been
filled and applications are being
taken for the remaining seven.

Student Legislature will take
up the following items of busi-
ness when it meets at 7:30 p.m.
today in Strauss Dining Room
of East Quad:
Homecoming Dance Report
Elections Report
Motion on the Radulovich
Case
Motion on By-Law Changes
Fair Play Stickers Report
All interested students and
faculty members have been in-
vited by SL to attend the meet-
ing.

4

I.

Stop what you're
doin', Seniors, and
take your proofs to

CRUNCH! NOT ALL THE SPIRIT'S ON THE FIELD ESSENTIAL EQUIPMENT

A Daily Photo Feature }
Pictures by BETSY SMITH
Edited by MARILYN CAMPBELL
and KATHERINE ZEISLER

the Student

Publications Building,.

When you know your beer

A:

I

IT'S A TENSE MOMENT

FOOTBALL ATTRACTS VARIED FANS

i

Sheet Music
Slightly Damaged
t 1 r

Enjoy '
0
Dudweiser a

:$
..... r .. .: _.._ .. ::.,...: _.: .. .. ...::.- _ .... 7:77
..::..:..

s

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan