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December 13, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-12-13

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1952

PAGE TWO

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

7

EUROPEAN TOUR:
Prof. McGeoch Attends
Famed Music Festivals

By CYNTHIA BOYES
While most people visit Europe
to look, Prof. Glenn,'McGeoch of
the School of Music tried some-
thing different on his European
tour last summer-he went to
listen.
Leaving Ann Arbor at the end
of August, Prof McGeoch spent a
month attending some of Europe's
finest music festivals. His first
stop was the Wagner Festival at
Bayreuth, Germany, where he
heard performances of Wagnerian
operas in the theatre built by
Richard Wagner, the originator of
the festival.
BECAUSE he wanted a theatre
specially designed to suit produc-
tions of his operas, Wagner work-
ed with the architect himself and
approved a plan for a sunken or-
chestra pit. Completely beneath
the stage, the pit is designed in
steps so that the violins are in
front and on the highest level anc
the brasses are low and farther
back, giving a beautifully blended
sound in which the brasses don't
blare and the singers voices car
be heard at all times. At the same
time the conductor is within view
of all performers on the stage.
The over-all effect of this
structure is so magnifcent that
Prof. McGeoch expressed sur-
prise that more of our modern
theatres haven't adopted the
idea.
Another feature of the Bayreuti
festival that Prof. McGeoch found
of particular interest was the sim-
plicity of the sets. He calls it the
perfect example of necessity being
the "mother of invention."
DURING the war when the fes-
tivals were discontinued, occupa-
tion armies used the Bayreuti
theatre, sets and costumes for pro-
duction of army shows, and poor
people of the vicinity helped them-
selves to the costumes and wore
them as clothing. Consequently,
when Wagner's two grandsons re-
vived the festival after the war
the sets and costumes were a]l
gone or ruined. Having no money
to buy new equipment, they went
-DN --
ENDING TODAY

ahead and began producing operas
on nearly bare stages employing
unusual lighting techniques.
"The effect of the simplicity is
terrific," said Prof. McGeoch.
"By taking away local color,
they universalized Wagner and
focused attention on the music
instead of the set. All the trap-
pings that made Wagnerian
operas difficult to perform were
done away with."
Commenting on some of the
other festivals he attended, Mc-
Geoch felt that the music festi-
* *

High Schools
Will Attend
Theater Clinic
Four hundred high school stu-
dents and their teachers, from all
over the state, will gather in Ann
Arbor today to attend a Theater
Clinic, sponsored by the Univers-
ity Speech Department.
The program has been planned
around a special performance of
"The Birds," to be given at 10:30
a.m. for the benefit of the guests.
"THE BIRDS," the current
speech department offering, pre-
sents many unusual production
problems. Not the least of these
are making goddesses fly, costum-
ing people so that they bear a
reasonable resemblance to birds,
and giving old jokes new topical
significance.
Immediately .preceding the
presentation, at 10 a.m., the
group will hold a discussion, in
which they will attempt to iron
out some of these difficulties.
After seeing how they have been
solved in' the speech department
presentation they will meet again,
to offer opinions and criticisms of
the play.
Slosson To Lead
Panel Discussion
Prof. Preston Slosson will mod-
erate a UNESCO sponsored panel
discussion on "The Situation in
Africa Today" at 8 p.m. tomorrow
at the International Center.
Three students representing
Egypt, South Africa and the Gold,
Coast will participate in the pro-
gram, which will be open to the
public.

(Continued from Page 1)
Following his plan of keeping
the audience part of the show,
Rosen chose as his first play
"The Clown Who Ran Away,
which will repeat last week's
performance today and Sunday.
Lines calling for audience par-
ticipation and a plot with a run-
SL Movies
Continue Run
Two movies, "The Magic Horse"
and "Nanook of the North," pre-
sented by the SL-Cinema Guild,
will continue their run with show-
ings beginning at 6, 7 and 9 p.m.
today and at 8 p.m. tomorrow at
the Architecture Auditorium.
"The Magic Horse," the fea-
ture length cartoon, is a story of
a little boy and his horse who has
magical powers. The movie, based
on primitive nature myths of an-
cient Russia, contains English
dialogue.
"Nanook of the North," por-
trays the struggle of an Eskimo
and his family for survival against
nature. Original Eskimo songs
have been used as the theme for
the background music.
Editor Resigns
University officials yesterday
announced the resignation of Da-
vid S. Pollock, assistant editor of
the University News Service, who
will become editor of The Michi-
gan Tradesman magazine in
Grand Rapids.

away clown, talking dolls,
horse, and robbers, he reason,
would keep critical lolli
crowds interested.
The enthusiastic response
significant absence of paper
planes flying through the
performance confirmed this t
ry.

a
ned,
pop
and
air-
first
theo-

Ann Arbor Children's Theater
Stresses Audience Interest

FOR SALE
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers models;
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. 12
2 x 31 PACEMAKER speed graphic,
fully equipped, like new. Phone Henry
Arnold 3-4141. )40L

I UAR.AW .F.Tfi hnhi PC and hrPecivrs_ r.SL- I

ARAKnEE 6, als ana reees, c
Rosen emphasized a definite naries, singers, cages and supplies. 305
need for University students in the W. Hoover. Phone 2-2403. )85

organization.
"There are many parts even in
children's plays which require
work and interpretation by older
students," he explained, noting the
six roles filled by University stu-
dents in the current production.
He also added a request for tech-
nicians, costume designers, build-
ers, makeup artists-in fact, any-.
one with time and willingness to
work.
Children's Theater's next pro-
duction is scheduled for spring.
Tryouts open to the public will be
announced then.
Prof. Blum Says
Resources Low
"Our natural resources are run-
ning out and we may soon have to
rely on income energy from the
sun," Prof. Harold F. Blum, of the
zoology department of Princeton
University, said yesterday at Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
Prof. Blum spoke on subjects
relating to his book "Time's Ar-
row and Evolution."
Future Therapists
To HoldMeeting
An important meeting for all
medical school juniors who have
declared their intention to concen-
trate in physical therapy will be
held at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in Rm.
4303, University Hospital.
Students in that category who
cannot be present should see or
call Virginia Wilson at 2-1531, ext.
337 to make another appointment,
Hospital officials said,

HALL SEAT with storage compartment,
small drop leaf table, oak rocker.
562 S. Seventh. )118
ASSORTMENT of Xmas Trees $1.50
and up. Kates Place, Phone 8134.
Drive in, free parking, Pontiac Road
at the railroad tracks, one block west
of Broadway Signal Light. Open 9
a.m. to 9 p.m. Sundays and evenings.
120
MEN'S Raccoon Coat. In superb condi-
tion, large size. Phone 3-4707. )127
REMINGTON Standard Typewriter -
Good condition, reasonable price. Call
2-3016. )128
USED TYPEWRITER for sale cheap.
Phone 7590. )129
"WEST AFRICA ON THE MARCH" by
John Dickson, former U. Grad. Stu-
dent, now available at $2.00 per copy.
Call Paul at 3-4740. )132
TAIL COAT-Double-breasted tux com-
bination. Size 38-39 long. Also ox-
ford grey overcoat. Size 38. Call
3-1886. )123
'41 PLYMOUTH COUPE-Good condi-
tion $200. Call 3-4145. G. L. Baker,
Rm. N35. )131
1950 PONTIAC 8, 2-door Silver Streak
Model. Excellent condition. Low mile-
age, under-seat heater. Phone Ypsi
2179R. )130
RECORDING MACHINE - A portable
SoundScriber, blond leather case, ex-
cellent condition, for dictation, lang-
uage study, interviews, -reports, etc.
$150 or highest offer. Also 2 speed
Musitron record player, 8-in. speaker
for square dancing, etc. $30 or high-
est offer. Ph. 2-9740, 613 Hill. )134
FOR RENT
WARM ROOM for girls. Single or
double. Near campus, shower. Rea-
sonable, 3-2719. ) 12F
ROOMS FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM-Newly decorated, Hol-
lywood bed, large desk and bookcase.
Linens furnished. 2-0218. )11F
NEAR CAMPUS--Small single room for
male student. $5.50 per week. 813 E.
Kingsley. )34R

IN',."
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR OVERNIGHT GUESTS-.
Reserve rooms now at rhe Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State). Phone 3-8454. 2R
SINGLE ROOM fora girl in private
home, location convenient to campus
and downtown Ann Arbor. Every-
thing furnished; laundry privileges
granted. 415 S. Fourth Ave. )35
ROOMS for couples, only 1 block from
campus. very desireable clean rooms.
Reasonable rent. 116 Church, Mrs.
Smith, Mgr. Ph..2-4744. ,)37R
TRANSPORTATION_
SERVICEMAN driving to Norfolk, Va.,
Sunday, Dec. 14, will accept passen-
gers for any intermediate point. Ph.
2-6654.
DRIVING to California Christmas Holi-
days. Riders Wanted. Scott Bonds.
Law Club 3-4145. )11T
HELP WANTED
WAITER and pots and pans man. Board
fraternity house. Immediate employ-
ment. Call Sherb Brown, 3-4707. )58H
PART TIME STUDENT HELP Evenings
and weekends for after Christmas va-
cation. The Wolverine Den, 1311 S.
University. )*H
PERSONAL_
GENERAL alterations and remodeling.
Tailormade button holes. Ph. 2-6673.
) 40P
STUDENTS-Contemplating a European
trip. For information on S.I.T.A.'s
itinerary call their student represen-
tative. 2-3016.

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS[ Portable and Standard
for rent, sale and service.
Morrill's
314 S State St.. Phone 7177. 18B
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & r.v
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & r.v.
"Student-Service"
1215 So. Uni., Ph. 7942
11 blocks east of East Eng. 115B
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet wasbing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. 1:B
CHRISTMAS shopping made'easy. Call
6007 for gift subscriptions. We handle
special gift rates for all periodicals.
Student Periodical Agency.
GOOD Rental Typewriters available at
reasonable rates. Office Equipment
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Phone 2-1213.
14B
MISCELLANEOUS
BEEN MEANING to find out about our
student faculty and regular specials.
haven't kou? Well, if you are not do-
ing anything why not inquire now.
Student Periodical Agency, 6007. 117M
ARE YOU spending a lonesome holiday
in Ann Arbor? We want a couple to
keep house for our two well behaved
teenagers from Dec. 26 to Jan. 4. We
believe you'd have a happy time.
Everything provided, horses, car. 5
mi. out of Ann Arbor. References ex-
changed. Call 3-0994. )23H

.4

U ,'

The Student Players announce . . .
TRY-OUTS

PROF. GLENN McGEOGH
* * *
val at Salzburg, Austria had fallen
into the hands of commercialists
and thereby lowered its level of
performance.
THE EDINBURGH Music Fes-
tival, though presenting a some-
what conventional program, gave
outstanding performances of sev-
eral lesser-known works. How-
ever, according to McGeoch, "The
one criticism I'd have of the Edin-
burgh Festival is that they have
too much going on. there - too
many different kinds of festivals
at once."
Particularly impressive, to
Prof. McGeoch, were his visits
to some of the new group of
minor festivals of superior qual-
ity that have grown up in
France, Switzerland and Italy.
These are all characterized by
the unusual nature of the music
they present. Unlike the larger
festivals at Bayreuth, Salzburg
and Edinburgh which are pro-
grammed to please international
audiences, the small, unpretentious
festivals avoid the ordinary and
choose relatively obscure works tc
please the musical elite.
Asked to compare American and
European festivals, Prof. McGeoch
could only say that he thinks
American orchestras are superior
and he felt that "America is be-
coming aware of what Europe has
long been aware of-that is, the
unique opportunities offered by
festivals."
'LL

I.
.I

___ _ - -- - -- -- - -- - - -- -- ,
To The Editor:
Michigan Daily!
I 420 Maynard1
Ann Arbor, Mich.
I !
1 I
1 Best Movie Released in 1952 was: I
I I
I P
Best Performance by an Actor in a Starring Role:
- 1
I r
Best Performance by an Actress in a Starring Role:
1 I
Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role:a I
I Best Performance by on Actress in a Supporting Role:
I yI
IName____________ __________
I AddressI
DAILY MOVIE CONTEST-A pair of tickets to either the Michi-
gan or State theatres will be awarded each of the 25 Daily readers
whose answers to these questions most nearly match those of
newspaper movie editors throughout the nation in the January
Associated Press Poll, Each reader may enter only once. In event
of ties, entries with the earliest postmark will get the awards.
To register your preference, and enter the competition, just clip
and complete the above form and mail to The Michigan Daily,
420 Maynard, Ann Arbor.

for the February production of
"PHILADELPHIA STORY"
a comedy by Phillip Barry
Sunday, Dec. 14, 2 to 5
Monday, Dec. 15, 7:30 to 9:30
Tuesday, Dec. 16, 7:30 to 9:30
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
EVERYONE WELCOME!

.'..~::~.'~j::.~..:.!:!-----------

= - smimamm"

IThe Only Notion
Picture Of
NR Its Kona!
Hof NOT A
WORD 1S
; SPOKEN!

k

1..W*MM.d

..

Ends Tonight
Joan Crawford
"SUDDEN FEAR"
- Plus -
"BACK AT THE FRONT"
MATINEES SAT. & SUN.
ADMISSION 44c
STARTS SUNDAY
PLUS
Jennifer JONES 1"

.... .: :: .:...r v .sr .... n.. .."!.v... . .:.: ! .+.?:: 4"' v ยข"i
Is TiE.SCREEN'
M-G-M presents
a great human story,
a great romantic story, \=.~
a great sea story... -
the stirring story of $ _
men and women 4
who took a supreme--
gamble with Fate...
and won! Inspired-
by the sensational '
best-seller!
GENE
~j 1.. .v/ VAN
* Y- T#~Y -
..> . . : .. . .. ..... ..... :. . ..: ...{. r... r . . ., . . . . .. ,-. ... ."J: \ ,J.J.L E. -. ii O 5N'

j,.

MARINE ADVENTURE !
"CRUIES EOHE ZACA"
WALT DISNEY'S 'GOOFY'
"HOW TO BE A DETECTIVE"
TECHNICOLOR CARTOON!
NEWS OF THE WORLD
Sunday
"OPERATION SECRET'"

with DAVID FARRAR_' 'sUCs
- Added -
"DROOPY'S DOUBLE TROUBLE"
Cartoon

i

,orph011C NEMAp

SATURDAY
nd SUNDAY Only

LAST TWO NIGHT S
CONTINUOUS FROM 5:30 P.M. TONIGHT
TONIGHT SUNDAY
The Magic Horse 6:00, 8:00, 10:00 ONCE ONLY
Nonook of the North 7:00, 9:00
Lost complete show 9:00 P.M. at 8:00 P.M.
THE JOYOUS COLOR CARTOON FEATURE
THE #MAGIC HORSE
fron the primitive nature myths of ancient Russia.
DIALOGUE IN ENGLISH
"T horoughly charmuing . . imaginative . . . cheerful"
-The N. Y. Times
ALSO
ROBERT FLAHERTY'S

THE SPECTACLE and EXCITEMENT of A-GREAT LOVE DRAMA
RND NEW HORIZONS ON THE SCREEN !
A giant cast...lavish backgrounds...
glorious voices...beloved musicI
COLUMBIA PICTURES presents
.Asya E viL .t

I

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