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December 05, 1952 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1952-12-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1952

___________________________________________________________________________________________ *

Progress of Vulgarity

RELIGIOUS BOOKS were burned, heretic
art destroyed, and music censored by
unsympathetic audiences-all this happened
in the not too distant past.
Then American society decided to try a
policy of "toleration."
It worked for a while. The taboos of the
Victorian Era were erased. The Steins,
O'Neils and Hemingways led the way.
American literature bloomed in the first
three decades of the 20th Century.
More people learned to read. More books
were published. A flourishing book market
was beginning.
Then their dapper disciples took over,
the Spillanes and the Caldwells.
No longer did the writer starve. Now, all
he did was to prostitute his art.
Fame and fortune were within his grasp
-if he satisfied the demands of the market.
And the market demanded: sex, horror,
and crime.
The multi-million dollar market ma-
tured. The world knew its greatest period
of creativity-in sex books, horror books
and crime books.
The housewife-Walter Mitty phantasma-
goria began. Thousands marched on the
literary world to* the cry, "'To hell with
literature.' Let's start a magazine. The
f market's getting too big."
And soon after, "To hell with magazines.
There's greener pastures in comic books--
in sex, horror and crime."

One day a busy Congressman looked
up from a bill concerning being kind to
animals and decided that there was some.
thing drastically wrong with the Ameri-
can literati.
So this week a most assinine situation has
begun to develop. A House committee is
now investigating obscenity in American
literature.
The comic book purge is over. The purge
of the twenty-five cent pocket book has
begun.
Publishers have been forced to defend
themselves. They are calling up the titans
of the past to fight in their behalf. Already
Shakespeare, Plato and Homer have been
brought to the fore in this Quixotic battle.
Hamlet is the publishers' justification
of the crime book, Socrates provides a ra-
tionalization for sex deviation, and the
not too gentle Achilles is the model for
the horror book.
"We do no harm by following these mas-
ters," the publishers claim.
"This is no defense," reply the noble law-
makers.
The Congressmen gaze unflinchingly at
these publishers: "We must have respec-
tibility, gentlemen, or . . . After all, we
must protect the offspring of generations
yet unborn."
In such a situation it is difficult to find
a grain of sanity on either side.t
-Mark Reader

FCURENIIT mQ/IES I

ArchiLecture Auditorium
FOUR DANCE FILMS; and THE BANK
DICK, with W. C. Fields.
THIS WEEK the Cinema Guild has gath-
ered four short films which provide a
small bit of three types of dance. The first,
a traditional East Indian dance, stars a
young woman named Singh. It is one of the
best technically, making good use of tech-
nicolor and photographic techniques. It is
simple and unpretentious, and sensible nar-
ration explains the intricate movements
that might otherwise have not been under-
stood.
Valerie Bettis appears in her own crea-
tion "The Desperate Heart." This is not
nearly as satisfying as the first; the danc-
ing seems austere and strained, and mon-
tage sequences detract rather than add
anything to it. Although Miss Bettis'
voice Is very fine, the poem she recites
serves only to lessen the effect of the
dance itself.
The third is Jose Limon's famed "The
Moor's Pavane." The dancing appears more
natural and graceful than Miss Bettis', and
exceptionally fine photography does much
toward making this the best of the four
films. While the music of Henry Purcell
fits the mood well, the awkward and inept
Interpolation of a few lines from Shake-
speare seems out of taste.

The final, and shortest, of the dance
films presents Russia's renowned balle-
rina Galina Ulanova in the adagio from
"Swan Lake." The briefness of the bit af-
fords only a glimpse of Ulanova's bril-
Riance, and technical imperfections in the
film and the sound leave much to be de-
sired.
* * * *
W.C. FIELDS provides the only excuse
for the showing of "The Bank Dick." His
talent was of a crude, clumsy sort, but it is
well to see again how one of the most pop-
ular laugh-masters plied his trade. A set of
stock actions, used with little variation, is
amusing for a little while, but once he had
used them all he could only repeat them un-
til they were no longer funny at all.
The movie itself is typical television ma-
terial,'with little subtlety and almost no
story worth mentioning. Fields portrays
the usual toper who finally and without
any reason at all manages to become rich
and respectable; he retains his affection
for alcoholic beverages, and would prob-
ably liked to have been called incorrigible.
While there are worthwhile moments in
this week's program-notably the Singh and
Limon shorts-on the whole it seems rath-
er poor. A better feature film would have
added much to the enjoyment of the show.
-Tom Arp

Ike's Labor
Appointee
WITH THE appointment of Martin P.
Durkin, leader of the AFL Plumer's
Union, as Secreta-y of Labor, President-
elect Dwight D. Eisenhower has rounded out
his cabinet, while at the same time repu-
diating Democratic campaign charges that
he is a captive of Taft forces or of any
other segment of the GOP.
Denounced by Sen. Robert A. Taft of
Ohio as an "incredible" appointment,
Eisenhower's selection of Durkin is none-
theless more generally regardel as a wise
one. Taft's violent disapproval of the new
labor secretary seems to stem from Dur-
kin's support of Gov. Adlai Stevenson and
his pronouncements urging sweeping re-
vision of the Taft-Hartley law.
Significantly few Republican leaders have
been willing to support Sen. Taft in his
statement that Durkin's appointment is
"an affront to millions of union members
and officers who had the courage to defy
the edict of officials like Durkin" (and vote
Republican). This lack of enthusiasm for
the Senator's views could be out of defer-
ence to Eisenhower's sudden political pres-
tige.
More likely it represents a sincere belief
on the part of GOP leaders that the ap-
pointment of the soft-spoken, middle-of-
the road Democrat is part of a broad at-
tempt to conciliate the mistrust and fear
of the Republican party that has been
built up within the rank and file of labor.
The fourth labor leader to become Secre-
tary of Labor since creation of the post dur-
ing William Howard Taft's administration,
the 58 year old Durkin brings to the office
nine years experience as president of the
AFL Plumber's Union and a long career of
honest administration in union affairs.
In 1933 former Democratic Gov. Henry
Horner of Illinois appointed Durkin to head
the State Labor Department, a position he
held until 1941 when former Gov. Dwight H.
Green, a Republican, dismissed him over
the loud protests of other AFL leaders in
the state. During his eight years as state
labor head he increased the size of the de-
partment from 300 to 3,300 employees and
had them all placed on civil service. He
strongly urged such bills as unemployment
compensation, extension of employment ser-
vice, the women's eight-hour law and var-
ious amendments all of which became law
during the period he held office.
In view of Durkin's outstanding quali-
fications, .his selection leaves little doubt
of Eisenhower's intention to surround him-
self with advisers of first-rate ability.
The appointment means that organized
labor will have direct access to the White
House. In addition, the President will
have at his disposal a man who can ad-
vise on how labor wlil react to public
policy measures. Durkin may also act as a
spokesman who can interpret the views of
the administration to labor and the pub-
lic.
In the final analysis, Eisenhower showed
sound judgment when he chose to select a
labor leader to balance a cabinet already
heavily stocked with representatives of busi-
ness, law and finance.
-Gene Hartwig
DORIS FLEESON:
The Turnover
WASHINGTON-General Eisenhower has
sent a firm of efficiency experts, Mc-
Kinsey and Co.-not to be confused, Wash-
ington quickly points out, with Dr. Kinsey-
into the Pentagon and possibly into other
government departments to survey manage-
ment problems for the Eisenhower team so

soon to move in. .
Following Senator Taft's blast against
the Eisenhower Secretary of Labor, Mar-
tin P. Durkin of the AFL, embattled ad-
ministration officeholders are suggesting
that the General could do with some
political experts to explain the Capitol
Hill booby traps to the same incoming
executives.
The fact is, now that the election is
over, the genus bureaucrat-which in the
top echelons includes a surprisink number
of Republicans--is relaxing and rather en-
joying the thought of how, as one put it,
life on the Potomac will unfold like the
petals of a rose for the General's predomi-
nantly business cadre. It could be that Con-
gress will have more confidence in the Eis-
enhower than in the Truman team which
it kept running to the hill to explain itself.
At one time Defense Secretary Robert
Lovett, a Republican, figured he had tto
hold himself available to 37 different con-
gressional inquiries.
With all his experience, General Eisen-
hower is perhaps a little naive about the
political shoals ahead, since he himself has
enjoyed such a long honeymoon with poli-
ticians and press. In any case, he is ap-
proaching his new job with very genuine
earnestness and fervor about the importance
of efficiency and teamwork.
(Copyright, 1952, by the Bell Syndicate)
"A ND WHETHER a man be a political
leader or the kind of a leader that seeks
to stir the kind of feelings that prevents men
from listening to arguments of other peo-
ple, that man whoever he may be or how-

"I Gave Him My List And Everything?"
- 4
'.low

ettePJ TO THE EDITOR
The Daily welcomes communications from its readers on matters of
general interest, and will publish all letters which are signed by the writer
and in good taste. Letters exceeding 300 words in length, defamatory or
libelous letters, and letters which for any reason are not in good taste will
be condensed, edited or withheld from publication at the discretion of the
editors.

TUESDAY

(at
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8
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Friday, January 23
Monday, January 26
Wednesday, January 28
Tuesday, January 20
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 22
Monday, January 19,

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 19 - January 29, 1953
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and recitations, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having recitations only, the time of the class is the
time of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be ex-
amined at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
12 o'clock classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes and other
"irregular" classes may use any examination period provided
there is no conflict (or one with conflicts if the conflicts are ar-
ranged for by the "irregular" classes).
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination. In the College of
Literature, Science,; and the Arts. no date of examination may
be changed without the consent of the Committee on Examina-
iton Schedules.
Time of Class Time of Examination
(at 8 Wednesday, January 21 9-12
(at 9 Saturday, January 24 9-12
(at 10 Tuesday, January 27 9-12
MONDAY (at 11 Monday, January 19 9-12
(at 1 Tuesday, January 20 2-5
(at 2 Thursday, January 29 9-12
(at 3 Thursday, January 22 2-5

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5

ON THE
Washington Merry-Go-Round
with DREW PEARSON

WASHINGTON--Truman's stopped calling
V VDrew Pearson names!!-Maybe Harry
Truman is getting mellow now that he's
about to leave the White House. Anyway he's
stopped calling Drew Pearson names.
The other day at a White House press
conference, the President was asked about
Pearson's exclusive report in his morning
column that the President and Governor
Stevenson would confer the week of Dec.
1 on the future of the Democratic Party.
Much to the surprise of the press con-
ference, Mr. Truman admitted that the
story was correct.
There was a time when the mention of a
Pearson news item caused literal fire and
brimstone to fly around the White House.
Meanwhile, the manner in which Pearson
has kept his readers ahead of the news is
high-lighted by several other official con-
firmations.
Among the most important were the
Merry-Go-Round columns of March 27 and
28, 1952, which revealed that Joseph D. Nu-
nan, while commissioner of internal reve-
nue, had increased his outside income from
$13,306 to $77,450. Pearson also told how
Nunan had attended a party given by
Frankie Costello at the Copacabana night
club in New York, and had thrown a $3,000
cocktail party for Attorney General Mc-
Grath.
On Dec. 2, Nunan was indicted by a
federal grand jury for "wilfully and know-
ingly" evading income taxes.
On Nov. 17, Pearson reported that two
Air Force sergeants in Korea had been
charged with treason. An official announce-
ment confirming this was made by the De-
fense Department on Nov. 25.
-STRANGE INVESTIGATORS--
PENNY-PINCHER John Taber, new GOP
boss of the House appropriations com-
mittee, will bellow like a wounded bull when
he hears it, but two of his investigators have
gone on a spending spree in Europe and
Africa.I
They are John Donnelly and Tim Dono-

ment from a special fund for Congressional
investigations.
On top of this, Donnelly had demanded
that the investigators be permitted to in-
spect top-secret documents. This was de-.
nied until a routine check could be made
of Congressman Taber's investigators.
When Donnelly raised a fuss, however, a
temporary clearance was granted,
Later, the Defense Department's check on
the investigators revealed that, Tim Don-
ovan had once been convicted of forgery,
had jumped parole, spent another 60 days
in jail for drunken driving. Yet he report-
ed on his application that he had never been
convicted of a crime.
Sothe Defense Department revoked Don-
ovan's temporary clearance.
son has hinted, perhaps as a joke, that he
might be willing to accept the job of new
Secretary-General of the United Nations,
Reporters asked him confidentially who his
candidate was to succeed Trygve Lie. "How
about me?" Acheson said with a grin. "I'll
be out of a job in January." . . . If Trygve
Lie goes through with his plans to resign,
it's more likely that the new secretary-gen-
eral will be Nasrullah Entezam, former Iran-
ian Ambassador to Washington. . . . John
Foster Dulles will bring into the State De-
partment Douglas MacArthur II, nephew of
the famous General. Young MacArthur is
a State Department career officer who
served as political adviser to Eisenhower in
Europe. He's also son-in-law of Vice Presi-
dent Barkley. . .. The Turkish Government
has formally offered to turn over part of
its territory to serve as headquarters for
the Middle East Defense Pact. The Turks
propose the headquarters be located in the
strategic town of Iskenderum, along the Sy-
rian border-not too far from Russia.
OLD SOLDIERS NEVER GIVE UP
THE MAN WHO gave up hardest regard-
ing Eisenhower's election was his old
commander, 'Douglas MacArthur.
At the last minute friends proposed a
compromise whereby the new president-to-
be would send MacArthur back to Korea

Anti-Semitism.. ..
To the Editor:
O MR. CAL SAMRAS excellent
editorial ("The U.S., Russia
& Anti-Semitism" Dec. 2 issue)
Amen!
It would seem the local Com-
rades have now been caught with
their "line down;" the Slansky
trial should reveal to all the true
nature of the anti-semitic, anti-
respect for individual rights and
human dignity as such, Red-Fas-
cism that emanates from world
Communism.
The Communists decry Fascism
as the world's worst evil, and set
themselves up as our guardians
against its terrors; yet strangely
they resort to trials in which the
charge is "Zionism" - somehow
reminiscent of Hitler!
This however should not be too
surprising, as one can remember
the Russo-Hitler treaty of 1939, at
which time the Communists didn't
seem to think Hitler was a bad
fellow at all. (This, incidentally,
Is a point the local Communists
would rather not remember).
Undoubtedly in a few weeks (af-
ter the "Daily Worker" gets its
explanation from abroad, and the
local Marxists get a copy and have
a chance to digest it), the local
Comrades will be able togive us
an explanation telling how the
present charges against minority
groups, are in reality merely steps
by the all knowing, all wise, Com-
munist party in its world wide
fight against Fascist terror-till
then we wait with baited breath.
-Beecher F. Russell
Late Hours .. .
To the Editor:
1 WOULD LIKE to correct a slight
mis-emphasis in the editorial of
December 4 titled "The Ailing
Quad Councils" Harry Lunn wrote
that the Dean of Women had "giv-
en her approval" to late hours for
women in the men's houses.
To everyone who spoke to me
on the subject, I stated that I had
no objections at all to such a pro-
gram. However, I heavily em-
phasized that neither I, nor Stu-
dent Legislature, nor Student Af-
fairs Committee, nor Women's Ju-
diciary, nor Truman, nor Eisen-
hower can legislate anybody into
being a guest anywhere: one's
host either invites you to his home
or he does not. After such an in-
vitation, a legislative body may
approve or disapprove such pro-
posals.
--Deborah Bacon
Dean of Women
Tom & Bernie ...
To the Editor:
WE HAVE BEEN given insight
into the remarkable though
confused philosophy of Bernie
Backhaut through his letters to
the Editor of the Daily this fall.
These letters stand as evidence:
Oct. 5, Stevenson is "comparable
to Jefferson in insight, vision, and
statesmanship."
Nov. 8, "I am not one" who sym-
pathizes with Stevenson, "Steven-
son made two mistakes. First he
vowed to talk sense to the Am-
erican people. Next he thought
the people smarter than the Re-
publicans think.. . They are
dumber . . . Stevenson took the
Democratic party to defeat. The
Democratic Party should not have
nominated him." (Just like Jeffer-

Two of Jefferson's biographers
(Molone and Bowers) said that
Jefferson had a strong faith in
the consent of the people as op-
posed to executive control by Ham-
ilton. By fighting those who feared
to give power to the people he
made democracy work.
Yet Bernie considers himself a
Jeffersonian (Oct. 5) and a lib-
eral (Dec. 5). Perhaps Potter (who
Bernie supported) and Nixon (who
Bernie praised Oct. 14) are lib-
erals too but I doubt if they would
appreciate the title.
Judge a man's position by his
words and his actions.
--Blue Carstenson,
President YD
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
by Friday night for reservations. All
interested students and faculty wel-
come.
American Society for Public Adiln-
istration, U. of M. Chapter, invites all
students of public administration, p-
litical science, and their friends to its
soci seminar. Mon., Dec. 8, 7:30 p.m.,
East Conference Room of the Rackham
Building. Mr. James M. Mitchell, Pres-
ident, American Society for Public Ad-
ministration, and a member of the
U.S. Civil Service Commission, will
speak on "Trends in Personnel Man-
agement."
Michigan Camping Association will
hold its annual fall meeting at the
Michigan Union on Sat., Dec. 6, from
9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dr. Sidney Rosen,
of the Research Center for Group Dy-
namics, will be the key speaker. His
subject is "The Camp Family and Its
Members." The meeting is open to the
public. There will be no registration
fee for students.
Faculty Sports Night at the I.M.
Building Sat., Dec. 6, from 7:30 to 10
p.m. All equipment available to facul-
ty families. For further information
telephone Mrs. Dixon, 25-8475.
Beacon. Lunch at noon, Sat., Dec. 6,
in the League Cafeteria. Adjourn at 1:15
to Professor Price's studio in Burton
'rower to read a play.
"THAVE long held the opinion
that the amount of noise
which anyone can bear undis-
turbed stands in inverse propor-
tion to his mental capacity, and
may therefore be regarded as a
pretty fair measure of it."
-Schopenhauer
Sixty-Third Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staf
Crawford Young....... Managing Editor
Barnes Connable........ City Editor
Cal Samra.......... Editorial Director
Zander Hollander......Feature Editor
Sid Klaus....... Associate City Editor
Harland Brtz........Associate Editor
Donna Hendleman....Associate Editor
Ed Whipple...... ......Sports Editor
John Jenks.....Associate Sports Editor
Dick Sewel.....Associate Sports Editor
Lorraine Butler........Wowen's Editor
Mary Jane Mills, Asoc. Women's Editor
Business Staff
Al Green...........Business Manager
Milt Goetz........Advertising Manager
Diane Johnston.... Assoc. Business Mgr.
Judy Loehnberg..... Finance Manager
Tom Treeger.......Circulation Manager

Cheipistry 1, 3
English 1, 2
Psychology 31
English 112
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
Great Books 1, Section 9
Sociology 51, 54, 60, 90
Political Science 1
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32
61,62
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
Russian 1
German 1, 2, 31, 11
Zoology 1

SPECIAL PERIODS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

i

Business Administration 22,
122, 223a, 223b
Business Administration 1
Business Administration 73,
105, 143
Business Administration 13
(Econ. 173)t
Business Administration 255
Business Administration 162

Monday, January 19

7-10 P.M.

Tuesday, January 20 7-10 P.M.
Wednesday, January 21 2-5
Wednesday, January 21 7-10 P.M.

Friday, January 23
Friday, January 23

9-12
2-5

t-

These regular examination periods have precedence over any
special period scheduled concurrently. Conflicts must be ar-
ranged for by the instructor of the "special" class.
SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit
in any unit of the University. For time and place of examina-
tions, see bulletin board in the School- of Music.
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
College of Engineering
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
January 19 to January 29, 1953
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of
the first quiz period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3209 East Engineering Build-
ing between January 5th and January 10th for instruction. To
avoid misunderstandings and errors each student should receive
notification from his instructor of the time and place of his ap-
pearance in each course .during the period January 19 to Jan-
uary 29.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

4,

Monday, January 19
Wednesday, January 21
Wednesday, January 21
Wednesday, January 21
Friday, January 23
Friday, January 23,
Saturday, January 24
Saturday, January 24
Monday, January 26
Tuesday, January 27
Tuesday, January 27
Tuesday, January 27
Wednesday, January 28

2-5
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4

Time of Class
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Time of Examination
Wednesday, January 21
Saturday, January 24
Tuesday, January 27
Monday, January 19
Tuesday, January 20
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 22
Friday, January 23
Monday, January 26
Wednesday, January 28
Tuesday, January 20
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 22
Monday, January 19

TUESDAY

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Chem 1 . 3-C.E. 21. 22 ffndav Januarv 19

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